Tag Archives: holly interlandi

Preview: Last Song #1


Written by: Holly Interlandi
Illustrated by: Sally Cantirino
Cover Colored by: Marissa Louise
In Stores: July 12

Nicky Marshall was saved by rock and roll – or so he likes to think.

An awkward upbringing and turmoil following his father’s suicide led Nicky to form a band called Ecstasy with his childhood friend Drey. The music takes them to Los Angeles, raw and gritty and teeming with personalities.

Nicky thinks they’re ready for stardom, but no one’s ever ready for stardom.

This first of four oversized issues begins in the 1980s, grows out of grassroots clubs & introduces Ecstasy to the world – whether it’s ready for them or not. From the brand new team of Holly Interlandi on scripts and Sally Cantirino on pencils & inks, this unique, heartbreaking story is about letting the music in… how it changes you and affects everyone around you, for better & worse.

Preview: Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space #4

Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space #4

Story: Carey Wilber
Adapted: Holly Interlandi
Art: Patrick McEvoy

Join Will Robinson, Penny Robinson, their trusty Robot, and Doctor Smith as they are whisked away to a dimension reminiscent of Lewis Carroll’s most famous fiction!

“Malice in Wonderland” is based upon a never-before-seen teleplay by the reknowned Carey Wilber, adapted by AGP Editor Holly Interlandi, and illustrated in lush color by series cover artist Patrick McEvoy.


Preview: Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures #3


Written by: Holly Interlandi, Carey Wilber
Adaptation by: Holly Interlandi
Art by: Kostas Pantoulas

It’s the closing issue of “The Curious Galactics”, a storyline based on Carey Wilber’s unfilmed teleplays for Irwin Allen’s classic TV show! Will and John Robinson, at the mercy of curious aliens, are confronted by a hideous monster. Is it real, or just another illusion sent by the Galactics to throw them off?


Preview: Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures #2

Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures #2

adapted for comics by Holly Interlandi
art by Kostas Pantoulas
colors by Patrick McEvoy.

On a routine radar expedition, John Robinson, Will Robinson, and Major Don West have encountered an eerie desert landscape that doesn’t seem to have an end or a way out. They are forced to make camp and fix their trusty Robot, all the while unknowingly the subjects of an alien experiment that is about to send some serious obstacles their way.

“The Curious Galactics”, alongside “Malice in Wonderland”, is a completed teleplay discovered in the Irwin Allen archives which was never filmed due to the series’ premature cancellation following Season 3.


WonderCon 2016: American Gothic Press’ Announcements

At their first ever WonderCon panel, American Gothic Press took the stage and talked about their first year they’ve had with titles like Gunsuits, Broken Moon, Project Nemesis, Monster World, and the more recent success in Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures.

The discussion then focused on the upcoming action title Killbox, with writer Tom Riordan and artist Nathan Gooden on hand to talk about the process and the decision to keep the comic in black and white. They revealed the cover of the upcoming third issue (see below). The comic drops April 20, 2016.


After Killbox, the conversation switched to Lost in Space, with discussion of both the current story arc “The Curious Galactics” and the upcoming “Malice in Wonderland” (LOST IN SPACE #4-6). It was announced that colorist and cover artist Patrick McEvoy will be taking over art duties for the second arc.

Lost in Space

The discussion then focused on the upcoming Tales From the Ackermansion Kickstarter launching in May. To celebrate Forrest J Ackerman’s 100th birthday later this year, Famous Monsters of Filmland is putting together a graphic anthology to honor their founder. The list of contributors so far includes Kirk Hammett, Ray Fawkes, John 5, Richard Christian Matheson, Dan DiDio, Matt Frank, Christian DiBari, Charlie Benante, Juan Ferreyra, Darick Robertson, Bob Eggleton, Ben Meares, David Weiner, Holly Interlandi, Joe Moe, Adam Egypt Mortimer, Travis Williams, Dave Kelly, Trevor Goring, Buzz Dixon, Mark L. Miller, Jim Terry, Jonathan La Mantia, Lara Antal, Victoria Lau, and Patrick McEvoy.


Looking towards the future, the cover for Island 731 by Jeremy Robinson and Kane Gilmour was debuted, illustrated by Jeff Zornow. The first issue solicits in May 2016.


Gunsuits will return later this year with Gunsuits: Alix, a one-shot with Philip Kim, Holly Interlandi, and Dennis Calero as the creative team.


Finally, it was announced that Broken Moon will also be returning, with Nat Jones returning on art duties. The cover was shown, featuring a sinister looking Gill-Creature.


Preview: Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures #1


writer Carey Wilber
art Holly Interlandi, Kostas Pantoulas, and Patrick McEvoy

Irwin Allen’s legendary Sci-Fi property returns! Before being prematurely canceled during its third season, LOST IN SPACE had several screenplays lined up and ready to film. These are those lost episodes, adapted for comics from screenwriter Carey Wilber’s original teleplays! First up is “The Curious Galactics,” a three-part tale that sends John Robinson, Will Robinson, and Major Don West from a run-of-the-mill radar scouting mission into a potentially deadly alien maze.


American Gothic Press Announces Irwin Allen’s Lost in Space: The Lost Adventures

At San Diego Comic-Con, American Gothic Press confirmed its licensing of Irwin Allen’s classic sci-fi series Lost in Space for a special six issue series based on two unproduced scripts originally written for television.

Lost in Space, which is currently celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2015, was canceled in 1968 after a run of 83 episodes. But two unproduced teleplays have recently been discovered in the Irwin Allen Archives — both written by acclaimed television writer Carey Wilber. These never-before-seen episodes will be adapted into a comic book series by American Gothic’s Holly Interlandi, with interior artwork by Kostas Pantoulas and colors by Patrick McEvoy.

The series is being overseen by prolific television producer Kevin Burns. Burns has been responsible for developing and producing a number of Irwin Allen-themed projects and television specials over the years and, along with Legendary Television, is currently developing a new, updated version of Lost in Space for Netflix.

The first story arc is an adaptation of Wilber’s “The Curious Galactics”. It will run three issues and will premiere in March 2016. The first issue will ship with four collectible covers by Steve Stanley, RC Aradio, Patrick McEvoy, and a photo cover.

Review: She Makes Comics

she-makes-comicsAs a literary critic and cultural historian with both feminist and queer-ally persuasions, I am often frustrated by the type of historical revisionism that provides the history of a marginalized group by telling their story as adjunct or incidental to “mainstream” or “normative” history. Such scholarship marginalizes the narratives of oppressed groups in the very attempt to recover their histories.

I was thankfully relieved, then, to enjoy the hour-plus-long documentary She Makes Comics, directed by Marisa Stotter and made by Sequart Organization in association with Respect! Films. This documentary does what very little of comics scholarship (and journalism) has been able to achieve: it narrates the story of women comics creators, editors, and readers through dozens of personal interviews (see a list of interviewees below), incorporating them as central to the history of the comics industry while highlighting individual creators’ push toward greater inclusion and respectability in a medium largely controlled by men.

She Makes Comics begins with an opening montage of interviews in which creators Kelly Sue DeConnick, Chondra Echert, Wendy Pini, Gail Simone, and others speak to the importance of the comics medium for female creators and readers. Particularly powerful is DeConnick’s declaration that “representation in comics is absolutely vital,” followed by the injunction that “we need to celebrate the women who work in comics and who have always worked in comics, and we need to go back and find their stories and bring them to the fore” (00:55-01:07). DeConnick bring an absolute necessity to the project of reclaiming the history of women in comics.

DeConnick’s spirited call drives Stotter’s She Makes Comics as it traverses the editorial bull-pens, creator biographies, convention floors, retail spaces, and four-color universes that make up the world(s) of comics. The documentary begins by establishing the medium’s long history of female readership in comics strips of the late 19th century and the early 20th century, pointing at the same time to the generous number of female comics strip creators, including Jackie Ormes and Nell Brinkley. Trina Robbins reminds us that “nobody at that time thought, ‘Oh how unusual! She draws comics!'” Despite the comparative preponderance of women in comics in the early 20th century, a cultural moment that abounded in strong women heroes and adventurers (and with a 55% female readership!), the “comics crusade” of the early 1950s began by Frederic Wertham resulted in the Comics Code Authority. The CCA significantly reduced the type and quality of comics produced, and the documentary makes the very brief argument that the “sanitization” of comics led to a boom in the masculinity-celebrating superhero genre and a subsequent decline in female readership.

The documentary then tracks the work of Ramona Fradon at DC and of Marie Severin at Marvel in the 1960s, transitioning rather quickly to the misogynist, cliquey underground comix scene of the 1960s and 1970s, where creators such as Trina Robbins and Joyce Farmer carved out a feminist space for comics. As Robbins recalls, “if you wanted to do underground comix [with the male creators] you had to do comics in which women were raped and tortured. You know, horrible things!” But in the pages of feminist comix and zines creators were allowed the freedom to depict women from women’s point of view—points of view that occasionally had legal repercussions.

The remainder of She Makes Comics focuses heavily on the history of women creators in comics from the mid-1970s to the present, owing both to the interviewees’ considerable experiences in the period following the late 1970s and to the growing visibility of female readers and creators. Particular highlights include the description of early comic book conventions and the fan scene, which Paul Levitz describes as 90/10 men/women. Creators and fans like Jill Thompson and Wendy Pini bring their personal fan and creator experiences to bear on this unique moment in comics fandom history. Wendy Pini’s entrance into fandom via her (in)famous Red Sonja cosplaying is historicized and linked directly to her entrance into the comics industry as writer and, later, creator of Elfquest. For those with an interest in cosplay, Pini’s Sonja is marked as the beginning of an opening up of convention competitions to women, and the documentary subsequently details the critical importance of cosplay to fandom, to female fans, and to creators.

The documentary also gives considerable attention to Chris Claremont’s run on Uncanny X-Men, uniquely noting the considerable influence of Louise Simonson and Ann Nocenti as Claremont’s editors on one of the most famous runs in comic book history. Interviews by female fans, creators, editors, and retailers highlight the importance that Claremont’s X-Men saga had to marginalized groups, with a number of interviewees describing the “mutant metaphor” as particularizable to women’s experiences in geek culture.

The documentary also gives attention to particular auteurs such as Kelly Sue DeConnick and Gail Simone, as well as the editor Karen Berger, who founded DC’s Vertigo imprint at a fairly young age in the early 1990s. She Makes Comics points especially to the rise of the independent comics scene in the 1990s and its boom in the contemporary moment, especially in the form of Image’s new-found success, as a meter for the rising prominence of women comics creators and a female (but also queer and non-white) comics readership. Anyone who reads Image comics regularly knows that its creators do not shy away from feminist themes even while Wonder Women is avowedly “not feminist.”

She Makes Comics ultimately signifies that a change in the comics industry has occurred, albeit slowly, in favor of greater inclusion and representation of women and other oppressed minorities. Despite this, the documentary comes dangerously close to assuming that all the good that needs doing, has been done, asserting a stance that suggests a triumphant growth of women in comics (or as readers) as a victory over patriarchy. While I do agree that strides have been made, as my articles on Wonder Woman and Neko Case show, I don’t think we can ever be complacent. She Makes Comics reifies “women” as a singular, almost non-intersectional category and in doing so creates a narrative of emerging possibilities for that monolithic category without discussing the many and complex factors that continue to challenge, harangue, and complicate both women’s participation in comics and women’s representation. There is, in fairness, a brief moment in which Marjorie Liu speaks about using her position to empower women of color, though its importance is overshadowed by its anecdotal treatment.

She Makes Comics has very few shortcomings and is ultimately a treasure trove of information that is otherwise spread across thousands of online or print media articles, books, and interviews. Marissa Stotter and her crew, in collaborations with a riot (isn’t that what mainstream media calls a gathering of political dissenters?) of talented creators and fans, have made a unique contribution to the history of women in comics. I challenge academics and journalist, myself included, to heed Kelly Sue DeConnick’s introductory injunction with a critical eye to the politics of representation. If we could get a few books about gender politics in comics that aren’t solely about masculinity, that’d be a start.

Interviewees listed in the order that I happened to write them down (after I realized it would be good to write them all down): Marjorie Liu, Nancy GoldsteinTrina Robbins, Ramona Fradon, Janelle Asselin, Heidi MacDonald, Paul Levitz, Michelle Nolan, Alan Kistler, Karen Green, Ann Nocenti, Chris Claremont, Colleen Doran, Joyce Farmer, Wendy Pini, Jackie Estrada, Jill Thompson, Lauren Bergman, Team Unicorn, Chondra Echert, Jill Pantozzi, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Gail Simone, Colleen Coover, Holly Interlandi, Blair Butler, Louise Simonson, Jenna Busch, Amy Dallen, G. Willow Wilson, Tiffany Smith, Jenette Kahn, Shelly Bond, Karen Berger, Joan of Dark, Brea Grant, Joan Hilty, Lea Hernandez, Christina Blanch, Liz Schiller (former Friends of Lulu Board of Directors member), Andrea Tsurumi, Miss Lasko-Gross, Molly Ostertag, Hope Larson, Amy Chu, Nancy Collins, Ariel Schrag, Raina Telgemeier, Miriam Katin, Felicia Henderson, Carla Speed McNeil, Shannon Watters, Jennifer Cruté, Nicole Perlman, Kate Leth, Portlyn Polston (owner of Brave New World Comics), Autumn Glading (employee of Brave New World Comics), and Zoe Chevat.

You can purchase She Makes Comics on Sequart’s website for as low as $9.99. If you ask me, it’s a fantastic deal.

Sequart Organization provided Graphic Policy with a free copy for review.