Tag Archives: edson ferreira

Search for Hu banner ad

Preview: Suicide Jockeys #2

Suicide Jockeys #2

(W) Rylend Grant (A) Iwan Joko Triyono (CA) Edson Ferreira (A/CA) Davi Leon Dias
In Shops: Sep 29, 2021
SRP: $3.99

After learning that his lost love might be still be alive, adrift somewhere in the vast ocean of space and time, Denver Wallace must convince his estranged team to set aside years of bad blood, saddle up, and bring her back home. Also, there’s a pretty funny reality show subplot, a panel where a dog takes a massive dump, and you know… plenty of cool monster-fighting stuff.

Suicide Jockeys #2

Strap in for Tokusatsu Action with Suicide Jockeys from Rylend Grant and Source Point Press

Ten years after a catastrophic mission gone wrong, Denver Wallace, leader of the Suicide Jockeys – a poor, usually drunken, almost certainly mentally ill crew of monster-fighting, tank-and-aircraft-piloting suckers – must pick himself up off of the proverbial and literal floors, slap his estranged, desperately-fractured team back together and right what once went wrong.

Creator Rylend Grant describes Suicide Jockeys as diverse cast Tokusatsu for the contemporary action movie fan. It’s essentially Voltron meets The Fast and the Furious… with an extra dollop of heart and soul.

Grant reteams with artist Davi Leon Dias, colorist Iwan Joko Triyono, letterer HdE, and producer RJ Hendricks, all of whom helped bring the Ringo award-winning political action thriller Aberrant to life. Aberrant is being developed for television by 24 & Felicity Executive Producer Tony Krantz.

Suicide Jockeys is a Tokusatsu comic through and through. Inspired by classic Japanese action television like Ultraman and Super Sentai, Grant teamed with Toku Expert Brad Warner, who previously worked for over a decade in Japan as an executive for Tsuburaya Productions.

Suicide Jockeys will also feature variant covers from Fabio Alves and Edson Ferreira who were both nominated for Ringo awards for their work on Grant’s much-lauded superhero noir Banjax. Banjax made a dozen critics ten-best lists in 2019 and was nominated for a total of 4 Ringo Awards.

Suicide Jockeys #1 will be available in comic shops and online at sourcepointpress.com on Wednesday, August 25, 2021.

Preview: Banjax Season 1

BANJAX SEASON 1

Writer(s): Rylend Grant
Artist Name(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist), HdE (Letterer)
Cover Artist(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist)
160 pgs./ M / FC
$14.99

A wholly original and delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre by Hollywood screenwriter/Aberrant-scribe Rylend Grant. A disgraced, terminally ill former superhero launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of supervillains before he dies. His former protégé – currently the public’s point-and-wink superhero ideal – is tasked with bringing him in. The Rub? He isn’t remotely up to it.

BANJAX SEASON 1

Preview: Banjax #4

BANJAX #4

Writer(s): Rylend Grant
Artist Name(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist), HdE (Letterer)
Cover Artist(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist)
***Same artists for both the regular and variant covers.
32 pgs./ M / FC
$3.99

CHAPTER 4: ONE BOLD MOVE. The first story arc of Hollywood screenwriter/Aberrant-scribe Rylend Grant’s delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre comes to a rousing crescendo. Despite losing everything he holds dear in the wake of Mason’s assault on the Gyrotech HQ, Raines still refuses to step up to his former mentor… so, a well-meaning Amanda does something truly demonic to force his hand.

BANJAX #4

Banjax Season 1 Collects the Dark and Wicked Superhero Noir

BANJAX 
verb (Irish slang) | ban·jax | \ˈban-ˌjaks\ 
1. To ruin, incapacitate, break, beat to hell, or destroy.
2. A mess or undesirable situation made as a result of incompetence.

Coming to you this October from Action Lab: Danger Zone is Banjax Season 1, collecting Issues 1-4 of the dark and decidedly wicked superhero noir. Banjax pulls no punches, suffers no fools, and repeatedly gets knocked down, but always gets back up again with a smile. It’s an utterly treacherous comic dance that has already been banned in three States AND Puerto Rico.

Disgraced former superhero, Laird Mason, is diagnosed with terminal cancer brought on by years of using his powers. Defending what he has deemed an ungrateful and ultimately unworthy city is literally killing him. With just months to live and a legacy hanging in the balance, Mason launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of scumbags before he dies.

When things get really ugly, Mason’s measured and deliberate former sidekick, Abel Raines – the public’s current point-and-wink superhero ideal – is tasked with bringing his old mentor in. The issue? Raines isn’t remotely up to the task.

Banjax was created and written by Rylend Grant with art by Fábio Alves, color by Edson Ferreira, and lettering by HdE. The cover is by Alves and Ferreira.

Preorder the Banjax Season 1 trade with the Diamond item code AUG191474 and look for it in Comic shops and on Amazon this October 2019.

Banjax Season 1

Preview: Banjax #3

BANJAX #3

Writer(s): Rylend Grant
Artist Name(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist), HdE (Letterer)
Cover Artist(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist)
***Same artists for both the regular and variant covers.
32 pgs./ M / FC
$3.99

CHAPTER 3: A MISSION FROM GOD. Hollywood screenwriter/Aberrant-scribe Rylend Grant’s delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre kicks things up a notch. Abel Raines’ gratuitously armed and armored Cerberus teams hunt crusader-turned-crazed-vigilante Laird Mason day and night. Just when it looks like all is lost, America’s favorite malicious and malevolent masked lunatic gets a key assist from the unlikeliest of allies.

BANJAX #3

Review: Banjax #2

Banjax #2

Banjax is a wholly original and delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre. That continues in Banjax #2.

Cancer-ridden former superhero Laird Mason launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of supervillains before he dies. His straight-laced protégé, Abel Raines, is tasked with bringing him in. The problem? Raines isn’t remotely up to the task. It’s a story presented exclusively from the maniacally twisted point of view of a man who hasn’t slept in over seven days.

Much like the first issue, there’s a lot to unpack in Banjax #2. Rylend Grant gives us a more thorough introduction to Laird Mason’s protege Abel Raines. He’s a man who has capitalized on his career as a hero with some pretty impressive financial gain. We get to see Gaines’ story through his own eyes. He’s building up for a big launch in the upcoming days that will, we’re reminded constantly, make him even richer. The one, unexpected snag? Laird Mason has returned and is waging a one-man war on crime. The public needs his former protege to stop him.

Once again, Grant doesn’t try to make you believe that Gaines is an altruistic hero. He never quite gets to villain status, either. This is a character who lives in the ethical grey areas. He’s a fallible man. He seems to struggle with his choices. The weight of responsibility and his past catch up to him.

As Laird Mason, the eponymous Banjax, is shown tearing his way through the criminal underworld on video screens, Gaines gives us a bit more context to what we’re seeing; it’s just enough to make you question who you should be rooting for after two issues – which is exactly the position I want to be in with a comic that thrives when you’re left questioning who you agree with.

Fabio Alves and Edson Ferreira are once again impressive on art duties. There’s a dark and gritty colour scheme that blends remarkably well with the tone of the story – but the art is never once too dark or muddled to see what’s happening on the page. Raines gradual descent into his sleep deprived state is shown with deft subtly between the background colours and his increasingly more strained facial expressions. The comic seems focused on the downward spiral of two men who are now but shadows of their former selves.

On the whole I was impressed with the first issue, and the second issue has built on the promise of the first. Grant, Alves and Ferreira have created a deeply intriguing series, one that’s well worth adding to your pull list if you’re interested in a unique take on a hero’s end of days, and the train wreck he’s causing as he goes out in a blaze of glory

Writer: Rylend Grant Art: Fabio Alves
Colors: Edson Ferreira Letters: HdE
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Action Lab: Danger Zone provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Banjax #2

BANJAX #2

Writer(s): Rylend Grant
Artist Name(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist), HdE (Letterer)
Cover Artist(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist)
***Same artists for both the regular and variant covers.
32 pgs./ M / FC
$3.99

CHAPTER 2: WHERE’S OUR HERO? When cancer-ridden former superhero Laird Mason launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of supervillains before he dies, his straight-laced protégé, Abel Raines, is tasked with bringing him in. The problem? Raines isn’t remotely up to the task. A story presented exclusively from the maniacally twisted point of view of a man who hasn’t slept in over seven days.

BANJAX #2

Review: Banjax #1

Banjax #1

Banjax #1 is a wholly original and delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre.

Laird Mason, a disgraced former superhero, is diagnosed with terminal cancer, brought on by years of using his powers. Defending what he has deemed an ungrateful and ultimately unworthy city is literally killing him. With just months to live and a legacy hanging in the balance, Mason launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of supervillains before he dies.

There’s a lot to unpack in this issue. Rylend Grant spends the better part of the comic establishing his lead character through flashbacks. Laird Mason provides the narration that doubles as an intricate history over the superhero’s active years. It also provides a window into his current state of mind.

Grant doesn’t try to make you believe that Mason is an altruistic hero. He’s as fallible as all of us. The cracks to his psyche are just beneath the surface even at an early age as he suffers through an abusive childhood. The catalyst to his becoming a hero is the sexual assault of a woman who Mason doesn’t know. It’s a classic example of her abuse being used to kickstart his heroic tendencies. A dip into bad tropes that are dragged out too often. It’s the straw that broke the camel’s back. Due to the attack, he finally decided to stop being an observer.

Though it is possible, given a remark on one of the following pages and some art that doesn’t convey explicit force, that it isn’t a sexual assault but rather a willing participant desperate for a hit. I’ll leave that to you to decide if you read the comic. Regardless of the nature of the scene, there’s more than enough of a grey area regarding the participant’s consent to make you feel a touch uncomfortable with the way that it’s visually portrayed. Mason’s reaction leaves no doubt as to how he views the scene. That begs the question of whether he’s right or if he jumped to conclusions.

Beyond that scene, the comic is a very engaging read – we see Mason’s life through glimpses that give you such an understanding of the character that you honestly feel as though you’ve been reading the series for 20-30 issues already – by the end of the comic you’re left feeling somewhat astonished by the amount of content packed into the twenty odd pages, It never once feels crammed, or forced, instead having a very natural flow to the story as you experience a whirlwind tale encapsulating Mason’s life.

Visually the comic is impressive; the dark color scheme mirrors Mason’s state of mind as we see him hit the highs and lows of life. Despite being a less than savory character Mason never tries to justify his actions. This isn’t exactly a man who is a hero in all aspects of his life. His acceptance of the kind of man he has been gives him an oddly understandable air. Not that he’s a likable person, but you’re able to understand his reactions to certain things in his life. In a single issue, we watch the beginnings and the fall of a hero, only to really start his story as it comes to a close.

Although there is a scene in the comic that may make some less than inclined to read this book, and I totally understand that, Banjax #1 is a comic packed with backstory that sets up a story with a lot of promise going forward. This is a hero with a finite shelf life, and so we’re going to get to find out just how far a hero is willing to go to ensure the safety of his city in his last few months.

It’s a comic that’s worth reading if you’re interested in a unique take on a hero’s end of days.

Writer: Rylend Grant Art: Fabio Alves
Colors: Edson Ferreira Letters: HdE
Story: 8.4 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Action Lab: Danger Zone provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Banjax #1

BANJAX #1

Writer(s): Rylend Grant
Artist Name(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist), HdE (Letterer)
Cover Artist(s): Fábio Alves (Artist), Edson Ferreira (Colorist)
***Same artists for both the regular and variant covers.
32 pgs./ M / FC
$3.99

CHAPTER 1: THE CURE. A wholly original and delightfully twisted deconstruction of the superhero genre by Hollywood screenwriter/Aberrant-scribe Rylend Grant. Liard Mason, a disgraced former superhero, is diagnosed with terminal cancer, brought on by years of using his powers. Defending what he has deemed an ungrateful and ultimately unworthy city is literally killing him. With just months to live and a legacy hanging in the balance, Mason launches a violent and misguided Death Wish-like campaign to purge the city of supervillains before he dies.

BANJAX #1
Almost American
« Older Entries