Tag Archives: oni press

Review: This is a Flying Rat

This is a Flying Rat continues the fun kids-focused graphic novel/picture book series from Andrew Cangelose and Josh Shipley.

Fun for both kids and adults we get to see a Pigeon and Rat compete to be the star of the book which delivers laughs and some great art.

Story: Andrew Cangelose
Art: Josh Shipley

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

It’s New Comic Day with Almost 170 New Digital Comics on Sale Now

Shang-Chi #2

It’s new comic book day and you can get your fill of comics right now at comics shops or online. ComiXology has you covered with your online digital needs. There’s almost 170 new digital comics on sale right now. You can get shopping now or check out the individual releases below.

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

Aspen Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Drawn & Quarterly

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Heavy Metal

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kid Beowulf Comics

Marvel

NBM

Oni Press

Papercutz

Red 5 Comics

TidalWave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant

Vault Comics

Zenescope

A Blossom of Hope in Debut Graphic Novel Coming Summer 2021

In a charming, delightfully warm style reminiscent of the award-winning Tea Dragon Society series, Oni-Lion Forge Publishing Group has announced the upcoming debut graphic novel, The Sprite and the Gardener, by Rii Abrego and Joe Whitt with lettering by Crank!The Sprite and the Gardener will be released on May 5, 2021.

Long, long ago, sprites were the caretakers of gardens. Every flower was grown by their hand. But when humans appeared and began growing their own gardens, the sprites’ magical talents soon became a thing of the past. When Wisteria, an ambitious, kind-hearted sprite, starts to ask questions about the way things used to be, she begins to unearth her long-lost talent of gardening. But her newly honed skills might not be the welcome surprise she intends them to be.

Join the neighborhood of sprites in this beautiful, gentle fantasy where, in taking the first step toward something new, both gardens and friendships begin to blossom.

The Sprite and the Gardener

Those Two Geeks Episode Eighty Seven: Captain Ginger and I Was The Cat

Alex is without Joe this week and talks to himself about Captain Ginger and I Was The Cat, two cat themed comics that he read this week from 2018 and 2015 respectively.

As always, Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jcb_smark if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter, or by email at ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

Underrated: I Was the Cat

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way.

This week: I Was The Cat


I don’t know how I missed this book when it first came out, and after having a conversation with the owner of my LCS, it turns out she wasn’t entirely sure how she missed it either. I Was The Cat is an autobiographical tale about a cat who has, through his various lives, lived thousands of years through history trying (and failing) multiple times to take over the world.

Burma, the cat in question, can talk. And seems to be an incredibly wise and influential animal who wants the world to know his story. To that end he invites Allison Breaking to begin writing his memoirs so that he can reveal to the world just who he is… and that it’s totally normal that a can had been trying to take over the world across centuries, and failing every time because… well because he’s a bloody cat.

Perhaps the most interesting part of the story is how Paul Tobin structures so many different tales within Burma’s history, and never once explains how Burma can change his appearance with ease – it lends the character a mystical aspect that’s never really explored, and I think the story is strong for that because this book is what Burma wants to tell us, not a historical accounting of his accomplishments.

Yes, I am aware that Burma is fictional.

I Was The Cat is probably one of the most interesting comics/graphic novels I have read in some time; it’s an engaging and entirely light hearted affair with only a handful of gorier moments (in a story set across history, there’s a lot that’s alluded to, but only one real moment where you see an animal get injured, and it’s such an ordinary occurrence that you’re going to wonder what kind of person you are that it doesn’t really phase you.

Perhaps one of my favourite things about the book is how Tobin gently critiques our current society through the eyes of a cat. It’s amusing without being deeply hilarious, and yet just unsettling enough to make you really think when you close the final page. Burma is easily one of the most interesting feline characters in comics, and I’d love to read more, but at the same time, this is a complete story and it doesn’t need a sequel.

This came out in 2015 or so, and went far below my radar for several years. It’s a lot of fun – and that’s why it’s a great candidate for today’s Underrated column. Check it out if you ever get a chance.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Review: My Riot

My Riot

What if the “she” of Avril Lavigne’s 2002 hit “Sk8er Boi” was both a punk and did ballet? Rick Spears and Emmett Helen succeed in answering this question in their upcoming riot girl personal narrative My Riot. My Riot is about a teenager named Valerie, who has lived a pretty regimented life up to this point. Her parents are fairly conservative, and she dances ballet and works an after school at an ice cream shop. Her only acts of rebellion are sometimes fooling around with guys and smoking cigarettes to “make weight” for the ballet’s performance of Swan Lake. However, witnessing a riot changes her life, and she ends up going to punk rock shows with her new friends Kat and Rudie (Who gets some of the book’s funniest lines) and starts a band ironically called The Proper Ladies even though she can’t play an instrument. There are love triangles, arguments, pitfalls, and yes, triumphs along the way as Spears and Helen tell a coming of age story through the trappings of early 1990s punk rock.

Throughout My Riot, Emmett Helen matches the energy of his artwork to the emotions that Valerie is feeling at any given time. He uses light lines and washed out, monochromatic baby blues in the beginning of the story as Valerie goes through the motions of ballet. She loves to dance, but hates the control that her teacher has over her body weight and shape and the cruel comments she makes. Helen’s palette stays sickly and suburban until he shows Valerie’s first meeting with Kat, who is vandalizing a teacher’s house and then swipes one of her cigarettes. This darker color palette and more chaotic line work shows up later when rioters throw a brick in the window at Valerie’s work and rise to a peak at Valerie’s punk rock show where she realizes she’s attracted to Jake, the sex negative, straight edge guy that talked shit to her for drinking soda with artificial sweetener. With its minimal color, Ben-Day dots, and “glued together” grid layouts, sometimes My Riot feels like one of the zines that The Proper Ladies’ fans bring to their show and exchange with other fans of riot girl music.

Emmett Helen’s art gets even more intense whey he depicts The Proper Ladies’ first gigs, and he has a real knack for iconic imagery, like Valerie’s perfect stage dive, or the venom and agency she has when she calls out some audience members for their sexist behavior. However, Rick Spears doesn’t rush to the fun, drama-filled rock star part and shows the bumps and bruises of learning how to play guitar, cohere as a band, and win over an audience. There’s an added degree of difficulty with Valerie being grounded by her parents as she learns chords from Jake at school and then jams with Kat over the phone. However, there is a real passion in these early sessions that contrast with the listlessness of her ballet practice even though she thinks her partner, Danny is kind of cute.

A major theme of My Riot is Valerie is taking control of her own life through music, and Rick Spears’ lyrics for The Proper Ladies echo her emotions and earlier events in the comic. For example, she has a real napalm strike of a song called “Fucking” that is connected to how her mom acts when she finds condoms in her room and also how Jake feels when she tells him that she’s not a virgin. Religion and purity culture aren’t mentioned in this book, but the male characters especially are firm followers of the Madonna/whore complex. However, Spears’ characterization of Valerie’s parents is balanced; they’re strict, but not Amish even though she has to work around them to start the band and use some fake sleepovers as excuses for their first tour dates. He and Emmett Helen even include scenes where they talk about how they might be too hard on her, and this friendly, yet complicated, and very relatable relationship gets some real emotional payoff in the back end of the book.

Rick Spears and Emmett Helen dig deep and capture the epic emotions of growing up through the language of spot colored, ink slinging punk rock comics in My Riot. Valerie is a well-developed protagonist with a complex web of relationships that directly bleed into her music and lyrics. It’s really beautiful to see her journey from simply being to becoming as some very un-punk philosophers would say.

Story: Rick Spears Art/Colors: Emmett Helen
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleAmazonZeus Comics

Today’s New Digital Comics Features Over 125 New For You!

Iron Man #2

It’s Wednesday which means it’s a brand new day of comics! There are over 125 new digital comics available for you right now on comiXology. You can check out the whole list of releases here and get shopping or check out the individual releases by the publisher below!

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse

DC Comics

Drawn & Quarterly

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Lion Forge Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 10/17

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Rorschach #1 (DC/Black Label)– First, I have to give kudos to Tom King for digging into the “pirate comics” of Watchmen and their creators. Also, to Jorge Fornes for working with a 12 panel grid and not just a 9 panel one. But, it’s safe to say that Rorschach #1 was a snooze of a read. There are some interesting ideas floating around like eccentric superhero collectors, actual real world comics creators doing seances, and political rivalries, but King and Fornes fail at giving readers a character to latch onto for future issues. They riff and tease, but don’t really do anything with the venerable Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons source material. Plain and simple, Rorschach #1 is boring, not controversial, and honestly, that’s worse in my book. Overall: 5.0 Verdict: Pass

The Vain #1 (Oni Press)– Eliot Rahal, Emily Pearson, and Fred Stresing turn in a funny, sexy 1940s riff on vampire stories in The Vain #1. Rahal and Pearson give the four leads a shit ton of charisma and big queer energy as they cross the United States stealing blood and finding a place where they can live the good life. This is in contrast with the milquetoast FBI agent trying to track them down. Vampires robbing banks is a fun enough premise, but the conclusion of issue one reveals this series’ real, historically connected premise. And it’s even better. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Grendel, Kentucky #2 (AWA/Upshot)**- Grendel, Kentucky #2 has visually striking art and letters from Tommy Lee Edwards and John Workman, but Jeff McComsey’s script is a bit sluggish. More so, since this comic is set to wrap up in two more issues. McComsey and Edwards establish the scale and frightening nature of the monster on the outskirts of the motorcycle club/weed baron’s land, mostly, through the effects of his actions. There’s some half-assed X-Files stuff with police investigating the patriarch Clyde’s death and a cast of supporting characters that are introduced and immediately offed. Edwards’ visuals definitely transport Beowulf to Appalachia (Sadly, the drug the family would sell/produce would be meth or heroin, not weed though.), but there isn’t much of a story to go with them. Overall: 6.0 Verdict: Pass

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #1 (Marvel)– This was my first experience with anything Warhammer 40K-related, and Marneus Calgar #1 was a definitely accessible take on this popular franchise from Kieron Gillen and Jacen Burrows. They introduce a totally dystopian world with big combat armor, buckets of blood, frightening monsters, lots of religious references, and dark humor around the edges. (I chuckled every time they mentioned certain planets’ life expectancy.) Plotwise, Marneus Calgar #1 is part origin story, part cosmic horror tale showing the titular character’s rise from rich kid to hardened Ultramarine. As a newcomer to the world, I liked the focus on a singular character. Finally, I would be remiss without praising Burrows’ versatile art as he nails everything from the details of weapons to some space marines-in-training’s joyful, yet terrified reactions to their beyond-hard-ass drill instructor’s sayings. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Hellions #5 (Marvel)– Hellions #5 throws a spanner in the fetch quest-y works of the X of Swords crossover. Zeb Wells and Carmen Carnero set Mr. Sinister and his Hellions (With a newly grumpy and resurrected Empath) on a suicide mission to retrieve all the swords and avoid the tournament with Arakko. The utter dysfunctionality and eccentricity of the team has made Hellions an entertaining read, and the higher stakes of X of Swords brings it to another level. Mr. Sinister constantly commenting on cuts of capes will never not be hilarious, and he and the team get to match wits with Jamie Braddock in this issue. With the exception of a gross resurrection scene in the beginning, Hellions #5 is more backstabbing and blackmailing than out and out violence. But that’s okay because Carnero is great at showing the quick glances, side eyes, and groans from more upright characters like Psylocke and Havok that fill this darkly funny and downright hopeless take on the typical fantasy quest narrative. Overall: 8.9 Verdict: Buy

New Mutants #13 (Marvel)– Doug Ramsey already has his sword (It’s his buddy, Warlock) so Ed Brisson and the always impressive Rod Reis spend this issue looking at his fears about participating in the tournament as well as his relationships with Magik, Warlock, and Krakoa. The sparring sessions between Magik and Doug have a wonderful energy to them while still showing that Doug’s skill will always be with languages and not combat. Reis uses a welcoming, green palette to show the close relationship between Krakoa and Doug and demonstrate that the mutants would go from being in harmony to basically parasites if he was to die in the tournament. Brisson also continues some of the scheming from Hellions as Exodus is skeptical both about Sinister’s mission and Doug’s chances in the tournament. All in all, New Mutants #13 is a strong character study for one of the most underrated mutants and has gorgeous art, especially when Reis evokes Bill Sienkiewicz in his depiction of Warlock. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Cable #5 (Marvel)– In Cable #5, Gerry Duggan and Phil Noto send the Summers family to space to deal with a figure of cosmic terror that has wiped out all of SWORD agents at The Peak space station. There’s a chance for Noto to flex his horror muscles, some family bonding, and lots of various types of energy blasts. Also, Scott gets to have some important conversations with Cable about how maybe he’s too inexperienced to wield a sword in the upcoming tournament. So far, everything in both love and war has gone Cable’s way, and it seems like Duggan is setting him or his family up for a big setback in the upcoming tournament. You know something’s off when Cyclops is utterly confident. Even though this comic has a very “side quest” vibe to it, Duggan and Noto do succeed in creating some tension for the upcoming tournament and showing that Jonathan Hickman doesn’t totally have the market cornered on the Summerses. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Oni and Lion Forge Have Delayed the Release of The Tea Dragon Tapestry

Oni Press, Lion Forge, and author/artist Katie O’Neill have made the difficult decision to postpone the release of the third book in her acclaimed Tea Dragon series, The Tea Dragon Tapestryover concerns it does not meet their print production standards.  

 In order to ensure the best possible quality, The Tea Dragon Tapestry will instead be published on June 1, 2021.

In the first year of print, Tea Dragon Society was included in Amazon’s list of Best Comics and Graphic Novels as well as School Library Journal’s Top 10 Graphic Novels and, in 2018, was included in the American Library Association Rainbow List, won the Eisner Award in both Best Publication for Kids and Best Webcomic, won the Dwayne McDuffie for Kids Comics, and won the Harvey Award for Best Children’s or Young Adult Book. 

Initially discovered as a webcomic, The Tea Dragon Society has charmed countless readers and fans across the world since its publication in 2017. The whimsical tale of the young aspiring blacksmith and her discovery of the titular tea dragon society has inspired everything from fan art to fan fiction, to cosplay, and merchandise, including two games created in collaboration with Renegade Game Studios: The Tea Dragon Society Card Game and the recently announced Autumn Harvest: A Tea Dragon Society Card Game which will be available on November 11, 2020. The Cybils and Eisner Award-nominated companion book to The Tea Dragon SocietyThe Tea Dragon Festival, was published in 2019.

Rick and Morty are Worlds Apart in 2021

Oni Press and Lion Forge have announced a brand-new Rick and Morty comic miniseries— Rick and Morty: Worlds Apart, coming February 2021.

Based on the hit series and Emmy-winning fourth season of Adult Swim’s Rick and Morty™, it’s going to get crazy for the Smiths and Rick Sanchez as new favorite characters collide in Rick and Morty: Worlds Apart. Catch the outrageous Balthromaw and his band of dragon adventurers in an all-new, tantalizing adventure where only Morty can save them. And when Teddy Rick shows up and ruins Rick’s ultimate vacation plan, no one is safe!

The four-part miniseries will feature the creative team of Josh Trujillo, Tony Fleecs, Jarrett Williams, Leonardo Ito, and Crank! They’ll bring to life, including perhaps the kinkiest team of super-villains to ever grace a comic-book page!

Rick and Morty: Worlds Apart joins other Rick and Morty comics as they hit the shelves in 2021, including new issues in the Rick and Morty Presents series, Rick and Morty: Ever After, and more.

Rick and Morty: Worlds Apart is slated to launch February 3, 2021.

Rick and Morty: Worlds Apart
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