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Review: Edge of Spider-Geddon

Spider-Geddon is coming but before that event get to know Spider-people from around the multiverse in this trade paperback collecting the four issue series and Superior Octopus #1.

Edge of Spider-Geddon is by Jed McKay, Lonnie Nadler, Zac Thompson, Gerard Way, Jason Latour, Aaron Kuder, Christos Gage, Gerardo Sandoval, Alberto Alburquerque, Tonci Zonjic, Will Robson, Mike Hawthorne, Mark Bagley, Brahm Revel, Craig Yeung, Wade Von Grawbadger, Brian Reber, Triona Farrell, Ian Herring, Andres Mossa, Jordie Bellaire, and Dono Sanchez-Almara.

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores January 15th! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Preview: Typhoid Fever: X-Men #1

Typhoid Fever: X-Men #1

(W) Clay Chapman (A) Will Robson (CA) R. B. Silva
Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 07, 2018
SRP: $4.99

• TYPHOID MARY has returned to Hell’s Kitchen and taken over the neighborhood’s psychiatric hospital, overwhelming Manhattan’s most dangerous neighborhood with her unique telekinetic abilities.
• When mutants and humans alike get caught in the crossfire, the X-Men have no choice but to intervene… only to square off against THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN?!

Review: Edge of Spider-Geddon #4

Science-Industrialist Norman Osborn’s life changed when a radioactive spider bit him. With young scientist Peter Parker working for his company, Norman became a very different Spider-Man and changed the world. Now, however, Norman’s son Harry is seen wearing a green armor suit and threatening everything Norman has built!

Edge of Spider-Geddon has been a series of one-shots introducing us to the various Spider-Men that will be at the center of Spider-Geddon. Up to this point, the issues have been top notch. I’ve wanted each to get their own series. This final issue is a bit of a miss.

Writer Aaron Kuder delivers a Spider-Man that’s a villain. Norman Osborn is Spider-Man in this world. He’s been twisted and warped. How? Why? We don’t really know. While we got a bit of a background on other Spider-Men, this one is an enigma. We get the conflict but not much of a set up. Due to that, it falls a bit flat.

Kuder is joined on art by Will Robson, inks by Craig Yueng and Robson, colors by Andres Mossa, and lettering by Cory Petit. Much like the story, the art is just ok. There’s nothing particularly bad about it but there’s also nothing too inspired. Where opportunities to do something visually interesting, simple solutions are taken. Designs aren’t pushed far enough. The limited amount of characters are forgettable and replaceable. Other issues have had some fantastic art with great detail, here, things just are there.

The issue seems like it’ll be a key one adding an x-factor into what comes next. But that’s its biggest issue. The creative team had some goals and just got there. There isn’t a lead up worthy of what should be a menacing Spider-Man. It’s overall a bit uninspired which is a shame as the subject has so much potential.

Story: Aaron Kuder Art: Aaron Kuder, Will Robson
Ink: Craig Yueng, Will Robson Color: Andres Mossa Letters: VC’s Cory Petit
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #12

Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #12

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: John Carpenter & Anthony Burch
Artist: Jorge Corona
Cover Artist:
Main Cover
: Brett Parson
     Action Figure Subscription Cover: Michael Adams & Marco D’Alfonso
     Connecting “Jack Through Time” Incentive Cover: Will Robson
Colorist: Gabriel Cassata
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Price: $3.99

This is it—the final ride of the Pork-Chop Express.

Preview: WWE: Attitude Era 2018 Special #1

WWE: Attitude Era 2018 Special #1

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Ryan Ferrier, Andy Belanger, Aaron Gillespie, Julian May
Artist: Michel Mulipola, Andy Belanger, Hyeonjin Kim, Kendall Goode
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Rahzzah
Incentive Cover: Will Robson (colors by Jeremy Lawson)
Colorists: Doug Garbark, Jeremy Lawson
Letterer: Jim Campbell
Price: $7.99

ARE YOU READY? The most iconic time in Sports Entertainment history comes to life in untold stories of the WWE. This anthology includes stories looking at Stone Cold Steve Austin, the rivalry between the Brothers of Destruction, Undertaker and Kane, and DX’s infamous invasion of a certain wrestling program “down South”…

Preview: Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #11

Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #11

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: John Carpenter & Anthony Burch
Artist: Jorge Corona
Cover Artist:
Main Cover: Brett Parson
Action Figure Subscription Cover: Michael Adams & Marco D’Alfonso
Connecting “Jack Through Time” Incentive Cover: Will Robson
Colorist: Gabriel Cassata
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Price: $3.99

Jack must atone for his sins if he’s ever going to be able to stop Lo Pan’s wrath.

WWE: Attitude Era #1 is Unveiled with a First Look

BOOM! Studios has unveiled a first look at WWE: Attitude Era #1, an oversized special one shot available in August 1st, 2018 focusing on one of the most important eras in WWE history. Join Ryan Ferrier, Andy Belanger, Aaron Gillespie, Julian May, Michel Mulipola, Hyeonjin Kim, and Kendall Goode for stories delving into the history of “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, the rivalry between the Brothers of Destruction, Undertaker and Kane, and DX’s infamous invasion of a  competitor “down South”…

WWE: Attitude Era #1 features a main cover by Rahzzah, with a variant cover by Will Robson with colors by Jeremy Lawson.

Preview: Big Trouble In Little China: Old Man Jack #10

Big Trouble In Little China: Old Man Jack #10

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: John Carpenter & Anthony Burch
Artist: Jorge Corona
Cover Artist:
Main Cover: Brett Parson
Action Figure Subscription Cover: Michael Adams & Marco D’Alfonso
Connecting Incentive Cover: Will Robson
Colorist: Gabriel Cassata
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Price: $3.99

Ching Dai has been defeated… but a new evil lurks for Jack and Co. as they attempt to pick up the pieces of the hellpocalypse.

Preview: Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #9

Big Trouble in Little China: Old Man Jack #9

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: John Carpenter & Anthony Burch
Artist: Jorge Corona
Cover Artist:
Main Cover: Rahzzah
Action Figure Subscription Cover: Michael Adams & Marco D’Alfonso
Variant Connecting Cover: Will Robson
Colorist: Gabriel Cassata
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Price: $3.99

Following his climactic confrontation with Ching Dai, Jack Burton finds himself in a place he never expected to see…and it ain’t Florida.

Review: Thanos Annual #1

Before he lights up the silver screen and potentially offs some superheroes in Avengers: Infinity War, Thanos gets the Tales from the Crypt treatment in Thanos Annual #1 with the Cosmic Ghost Rider playing the role of Cryptkeeper and telling the story of the Mad Titan’s most demented deeds to a surprise audience. Cosmic Ghost Rider’s pitch black, Southern fried sense of humor keeps the story chugging along through different art styles and an all-star creative team featuring Kieron Gillen‘s return to the Marvel Universe and My Little Pony writer/artist Katie Cook telling a dark of story of fratricide, mass suicide, mass graves, and candy cane impalings.

The current Thanos ongoing series’ creative team of Donny Cates, Geoff Shaw, and Antonio Fabela lead off the annual with a short, yet potent story of Thanos’ relationship with his daughter Gamora. Shaw’s art is fluid and shows why Gamora is considered to be the “Deadliest Woman in the Universe” and bursts of green blood from Fabela show that gore, death, and both physical and mental trauma are going to be a recurring motif in this comic book. Their Thanos has a malevolent evil force meets worst stage/bleacher dad ever vibe as Gamora is completely under his control to shape into something that is more of a weapon than a human being. Also, Thanos might be considered a supervillain, and Gamora is a member of the de facto superhero team, the Guardians of the Galaxy, but this story is more science fiction than superhero, especially with its twist ending that was totally once used in an episode of Rick and Morty.

Chris Hastings (Gwenpool), Flaviano (I Am Groot), and Frederico Blee (She-Hulk) go all out cringe comedy in their story which is as painful as slowly removing your fingernails and toenail, one by one. It’s about Thanos visiting a young man every year on his birthday (Except for one because there was a major Marvel Universe crossover.) and making his life utterly miserable depending on his current life situation. Basically, Thanos is evil on both a macro and micro level. He can be annoying like nuclear warfare or annoying like a hangnail. Also, the panel of Thanos texting is up there with the legendary “Thanoscopter”, and honestly, I spent most of the story wondering what evil breakup causing text he concocted. I love how Hastings, Flaviano, and Blee took a pretty standard slice of life setup and turned into torture via sequential art.

Kieron Gillen has a mini reunion with his WicDiv 455 AD collaborators Andre Araujo and Chris O’Halloran in a cosmic take on Say Anything with Thanos playing John Cusack, Lady Death as Ione Skye, and planetary explosions subbing in for a boombox. Because it’s technically about art, Gillen, Araujo, and O’Halloran’s story is metafictional with Thanos commenting that none of these stories really matter in the face of death. In a kind of Lucien’s library of unpublished books in Sandman move, Gillen also creates some of the potentially coolest planets in the Marvel Universe, including a basically Choose Your Own Adventure planet, and then literally blows it up because art can do nothing to stave off mortality. But, hey, O’Halloran colors some pretty explosions, and Araujo continues his knack for architecture in his design for Lady Death’s palace.

The next story in Thanos Annual is both funny and disturbing and sort of in the vein of Happy Tree Friends or I Hate Fairyland. In it, Katie Cook and let’s make this look as much like a cute kid’s cartoon as possible colorist Heather Breckle tell the story of Thanos visiting a planet inhabited by Adorales, who do whatever he wants. Of course, they worship him as a god and then start killing each other in twisted ways after Thanos makes a death threat towards them because they won’t stop bouncing all over him. The adorable style of Cook’s art allows her to get away with a lot more violence than the other more traditionally drawn stories in Thanos Annual and leads to some squicky moments with the Adorales’ lifeless bodies filling up the page. Luckily, Cook fills the story with some great  asides from Thanos, who was not expecting this kind of situation just as much as the readers.

In the next story, Ryan North, Will Robson, and Rachelle Rosenberg rapidly switch gears from fish out of water comedy (Thanos helping to searing existential torture and also make good use of the walking plot device that is the Infinity Gauntlet. With the exception of a colorful intro page where he and Rosenberg throw it back to the actual Infinity Gauntlet story with battles and superheroes, Robson’s art is pretty deadpan, and he nails the hilarious reactions that every day people have to Thanos helping and chatting pleasantly with an old lady. Of course, he has a supremely evil ulterior motive of stifling a brilliant mind from having an epiphany and finding a cure for all diseases and sickness. North gets to write a fantastic monologue at the end about how he doesn’t just love physical death, but the death of hope and potential. Most of us will never experience half the Earth population dying, but many people struggle with not reaching their potential so this story kind of hits hard after its absurdist beginning.

The thought provoking nature of “That Time Thanos Helped An Old Lady Cross the Street” extends to the final, full story in Thanos Annual #1 before it’s wrapped up with an ending tag featuring Cosmic Ghost Rider and a mysterious guest character. Al Ewing is one of Marvel’s most imaginative and intelligent writers, and he uses a science fiction and a gorgeously painted tale from Frazer Irving to ask an age old theological question, “Can people be moral without a higher power to look up to?” Before this question is asked by Thanos, who literally kills a god in an epic Irving splash page, Ewing and Irving create almost the perfect religion that is a hybrid of Golden Rule-driven monotheism with a side of reincarnation. However, Thanos totally upends the scientific mechanisms that kept this faith chugging along and creates one hell of an existential crisis for the Kehlrassians that bleeds into Cosmic Ghost Rider’s narration because he has been to both Heaven and Hell. It reminds readers that Thanos is both a psychological and physical threat, which is something that Ewing explored in the second half of his Ultimates run. (RIP)

Stealthily, Thanos Annual #1 is just a great collection of intelligent and darkly humorous sci-fi shorts that just happen to take place in the Marvel Universe. It features some of its most clever writers and artists that have an eye for both humor and violence on a large and small scale and makes you realize that reading stories about Thanos is like staring into the abyss or being one of those dumbasses that looked at the solar eclipse without those special glasses.

Story: Donny Cates, Chris Hastings, Kieron Gillen, Katie Cook, Ryan North, Al Ewing Art: Geoff Shaw, Flaviano, Andre Araujo, Katie Cook, Will Robson, Frazer Irving Colors: Antonio Fabela, Frederico Blee, Chris O’Halloran, Heather Breckle, Rachelle Rosenberg 
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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