Tag Archives: hawkeye

Avengers: Endgame Minimates Assemble in Stores!

Avengers Assemble! The Endgame is upon us, and everyone is on the edge of their seat! We may not know what’s going to happen, but one thing’s for sure, when we come out of the movie we’re going to want some cool collectibles of our favorite characters! Luckily, new Avengers Endgame Minimates have just assembled in Walgreens stores and comic shops nationwide!

Four two-packs are now available exclusively at Walgreens stores, each pairing two cast members from the sure-to-be-blockbuster film – Iron Man with Thanos, Black Widow with Hawkeye, Hulk with War Machine, and Quantum Suit Captain America with Quantum Suit Rocket. That last pack also includes alternate parts to turn Captain America into Thor, complete with Stormbreaker!

In comic shops now, a special exclusive Marvel Minimates box set brings four more figures – including alternate looks to create more characters – into the game! The set includes Tony Stark in his Quantum suit, with alternate heads for Hawkeye and Ant-Man; Black Widow with an alternate head for Nebula; Quantum Suit Hulk and Quantum Suit War Machine. Buy two sets to get all the bodies you need to make all the characters!

Each 2-inch block figure features 14 points of articulation and fully interchangeable parts.

Review: West Coast Avengers #1

Spinning out of her fantastic Hawkeye run, Kelly Thompson kicks off the next stage in Kate Bishop’s heroic career and makes her the leader of the Avengers with artist Stefano Caselli and Triona Farrell. Well, it’s the West Coast Avengers to be honest, and they fight lands harks and 200 feet Tigras and are funded by Quentin Quire’s reality TV show and camera crew. But questionable credentials aside, Thompson and Caselli have created something special: a comedic superhero team in the vein of the classic “bwahaha” Justice League International for 2018. Caselli can do literal big action and big funny as well as romance (Kate’s boyfriend from Hawkeye is on the team as the rookie superhero, Fuse) and even capture the watercolor beauty of traveling through America Chavez’s star portals. He gives West Coast Avengers a blockbuster scope while not sacrificing the humor or quirkiness.

Like most team superhero first issues, West Coast Avengers #1 is all about assembling the team and setting up the team’s first obstacle. Thompson and Caselli create this new Avengers squad from a highly organic place: Kate Bishop freaking out. Seriously, fighting land sharks with a bow and arrow and some martial arts is a tall order. There’s also the more logical place that most superheroes in the Marvel Universe are clustered around New York City and really there needs to be a dedicated, experienced superhero team to protect the West Coast, especially the United States’ second biggest media market, L.A. (Sorry Runaways!) Thompson and Caselli immediately set up the team’s key relationships by having Kate call in the other Hawkeye, Clint Barton and her BFF, America Chavez to help out with the initial threat. They have an easy conversational rhythm in the heat of battle, and Barton especially fits into his supporting role with Stefano Caselli drawing hilarious reaction shots of him watching Kate ride a herd of sharks into the ocean or his responses when Fuse acts about Kate’s ex Noh Varr, who wasn’t invited to the team.  He also acts as the connection

The two wild cards on West Coast Avengers are Gwenpool and Quentin Quire, who brings in the reality TV show angle and makes sure everyone around him knows that he’s an omega level mutant and the strongest member of the team. Since the mid-2000s and the New Warriors, the reality TV superhero angle has been used a lot in comic, but Thompson and Caselli don’t use it for broad brushed satire. Instead, they use the sound bites for characterization and quick moments of levity like when Quire and Gwenpool blow something up in the background while Kate is doing a semi-serious confessional. During these big gags, colorist Triona Farrell’s palette is bolder and absurd than her usual sunny SoCal color choices with the soft purple of Kate’s costume or the glow of the horizon.

West Coast Avengers is a grounded world of ex-boyfriends and sprawling and eating pizza after a hard day’s work, but it’s also a world of Looney Tunes Gwenpool guns and this never gets old, land sharks. Stefano Caselli uses reaction panels to wink at the audience and say, “Yes, this book is weird. Enjoy it!” It can segue from a romance beat to a comedy beat and then an action beat and back again in the space of a couple pages like when Kate and Fuse are making out, run into Quentin Quire and Gwenpool aka “useless Deadpool knockoff” bickering about a wet towel prank to jumping into action via an America star portal. West Coast Avengers has a light tone without devolving too much into parody. For example, giant Tigra is a very real threat to the team and also an opportunity for team leader, Kate Bishop, to exercise situational ethics as she begins with getting Tigra’s old teammate Clint to try to talk her down before bringing in Quentin Quire with the psychic knockout punch.

In recent years, Marvel Comics has had several strong comedy titles in their lineup (Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Howard the Duck, and Max Bemis’ Worst X-Man Ever come to mind), but Kelly Thompson, Stefano Caselli, and Triona Farrell bring the funny to a team superhero book in West Coast Avengers.  It also continues the fantastic arc that Thompson has crafted for Kate Bishop over the past two years and providing a new home for the madcap antics of Gwenpool, the goofiness and salt of the earth earnestness of Clint Barton, the laconic punching of America Chavez (Hopefully, she isn’t relegated to team chauffeur.), and the pompous edginess and untapped potential of Quentin Quire. In one issue, a team with an interesting dynamic has been assembled as well as a bad guy that fits the tone of the book so all in all, West Coast Avengers #1 is a win.

Story: Kelly Thompson Art: Stefano Caselli
Colors: Triona Farrell Letters: Joe Caramagna

Story: 8.4 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Hawkeye #16

hawkeye16coverThis era of Hawkeye draws to a close as Kelly Thompson, Leonardo Romero, and Jordie Bellaire deliver a story full of punching, trick arrows, and quips that still resonates emotionally. Sure, the clones and time travel might be a little too much, but the light, delightful tone of the story makes it work. Hawkeye #16 is Kate and Clint’s last stand against Madame Masque and Eden Vale, who can use people’s blood to bring them back through time temporarily, including some of the greatest ranged weapon using villains in the Marvel Universe. In a previous issue, Eden told Kate that she could bring her mother back. And to spice things up even more, there’s also Kate’s mental suggestion ability having father waiting in the wings as a wild card. It’s a slugfest of an ending that shows how Kate has built a great, if a little crazy life for herself and still leaves a couple plot threads for Thompson to play with when a book featuring Kate Bishop comes back in August.

Throughout his run on Hawkeye, Leonardo Romero has shown a real knack for connecting readers to the action starting with Kate and Clint with their backs literally up against the wall surrounded by a horde of enemies. Matt Fraction and David Aja’s Hawkeye paid homage to Rio Grande. This is Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid transposed to the key of Humphrey Bogart playing Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon. The noir tones of the earlier issue have been replaced with hand to hand combat and sort of siege warfare. The fight scenes really work when Romero draws a sequence from a rooftop vantage point to create an activity and trick arrow filled double page spread or tightens up and shows a one on one battle in a nine panel grid like Clint fighting his former mentor, Swordsman and kicking his ass.

Romero and Jordie Bellaire also capture these nigh flawless close-ups of characters before a big emotional beat like Eden realizing her quest for vengeance is hurting innocent people, like a young girl who reminds her of dead daughter. Bellaire does something beautiful with her palette later in the book using a faded blue to reunite Eden with her daughter for one last moment juxtaposed with a faded pink flashback of  of Romero’s art is clever, fluid,  never boring, and when he trades out arrows with shields, I think he will be a perfect fit for Captain America.

Hawkeyex2

Humor and sass are two of Kelly Thompson’s greatest strengths as a writer, and the sass level is doubled when Kate and Clint are both together in Hawkeye #16. Honestly, along with Romero’s art, the sass is the reason why Hawkeye is one of my favorite Marvel books. I’m dying to see what goofy thing will come out of Clint’s mouth or a choice portion of snark quip that Kate will deliver. And the best and most adorable parts is when Kate and Clint make the same joke at the same time because they have the best, bad strategy at the same time involving exploding arrows and heart to hearts. Romero and Bellaire’s storytelling skill at drawing the reader’s eye to the main action on the page as well as some great deadpan reaction shots allow Thompson’s jokes to hit and not have to go into narrator mode until the every end because every private eye story worth its salt has to end with an insightful voiceover.

Kelly Thompson, Leonardo Romero, and Jordie Bellaire pull out all the cool archery move/surprise superpower/generally badass stops in Hawkeye #16, which reads like the third act of a particularly thrilling buddy action movie. However, it’s not entirely caught up in the cool, and Kate finds a little bit of closure with her whole supervillain dad/dead (Or not so dead) mom situation thanks to the help of her new friends in L.A. Kate Bishop, the best Hawkeye, might not have the best life, but she does have a pretty good one.

Story: Kelly Thompson Art: Leonardo Romero Colors: Jordie Bellaire
Story: 8.7 Art: 9.4 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

 

Preview: Hawkeye #16

Hawkeye #16

(W) Kelly Thompson (A) Leonardo Romero (CA) Julian Totino Tedesco
Rated T+
In Shops: Mar 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

• As Madame Masque, Eden and a crew of misfit villains take on Hawkeye and Hawkeye with renewed vengeance, our heroes dig deep into themselves to solve the unique challenges they face.
• Arrows can’t solve EVERYTHING, it seems. Who knew?!
• When the dust settles, what will the future hold for the two Hawkeyes?

Preview: Hawkeye #15

Hawkeye #15

(W) Kelly Thompson (A) Leonardo Romero (CA) Julian Totino Tedesco
Rated T+
In Shops: Feb 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

FAMILY REUNION PART 3!
• Two Hawkeyes deserve two super villains – it’s only natural (and so, so bad). Kate and Clint find themselves fighting both Eden and Madame Masque, who have teamed up under the “common enemy” banner.
• Emotional punches WILL be thrown…along with actual punches, of course. It’s dangerous to be a Hawkeye these days.

HAWKEYE #15

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow. What do you plan on getting? What are you excited for? Sound off in the comments below! We’ll have our picks in a bit but here’s some news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Quint – Watch: Law Can Be Confusing, But These Comic Books May Help – Some neat suggestions.

 

Reviews

CBR – Batman #36

Comic Attack – Catalyst Prime: Noble #7

Newsarama – Hawkeye #13

Talking Comics – Justice League #34

Atomic Junk Shop – Ladycastle #1

Comic Book Bin – The Promised Neverland Vol. 1

 

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II #1 (DC Comics/IDW Publishing) – I thoroughly enjoyed the first miniseries featuring these two properties, and while I half expect this to be nothing more than a shameless cash grab I’m oddly excited to see the Dark Knight cross paths with the Turtles again. I would say you don’t see that happen often, but that’s not necessarily the case anymore – and I’m quite happy about that.

Green Arrow #35 (DC Comics) – One of the sleeper hits for me is Green Arrows ongoing series. The art is whimsical and sweepingly beautiful, and the story about one man fighting a giant corporate conspiracy theory is far stronger than it seemed at first. Definitely one to keep on your radar.

Faith’s Winter Wonderland Special #1 (Valiant) – Marguerite Sauvage pulls double duty on this one, and I’m curious as to what she’ll offer – as long as it’s fun (and looks as awesome as she’s proven her self capable of drawing) then I’ll be happy.

 

Jen

Top Pick: Jupiter Jet #1 (Action Lab Entertainment) – The debut issue of this teenaged Robin Hood story with a science fiction twist grabbed my attention immediately. The art, vaguely reminiscent of Squirrel Girl (probably not a mistake), makes early promises of a book with lighthearted romps plastered from cover to cover.

Harley and Ivy Meet Betty and Veronica #3 (DC Comics/Archie Comics) –  I am going to be honest–I didn’t know this title was out already. Time to catch up. Girl power is promised in BUNDLES in a book featuring four iconic women from comics, and the mashup of Good vs. Bad (can we definitively call Harley/Ivy evil?) should be a great time.

Jem and the Holograms Dimensions #1 (IDW Publishing) – More girl power. Step one: put a cat on the cover. Step two, promise some light-hearted hijinx featuring girls from both sides of the tracks (I’m sensing a theme this week…). Step three: throw in a good old-fashioned game of Dungeons and Dragons. What could possibly go wrong?

I Hate Fairyland Deluxe HC Vol. 1 (Image Comics) – A 36 year old woman trapped in a 6 year old’s body isn’t even close to the most grotesque thing going on in Skottie Young’s modern masterpiece. Young’s delightfully vulgar sense of humor truly shines in his first Image title. The Deluxe collection promises plenty of extras which will likely ooze with….something nasty.

Archie #26 (Archie Comics) – What can I say, I’ve been a sucker for the redhead and his bumbling misadventures since I was a kid. Old habits, and all that. But the All-new Archie has taken us some places we’ve never been before, and I for one can’t wait to see where we go next.

 

Shay

Harley & Ivy Meet Betty & Veronica #3 (DC Comics) – Do I really need a reason? It’s like my childhood met my teen hood in a bar and I’m here for it. This might be one of the few times where crossing the streams is a good thing.

Throwaways #10 (Image Comics) – Dean and Abby are still trying to get to the bottom of the conspiracy theory that is their life while dealing with the latest hinderences , like being separated by guards, as the hunt for the truth. The series is hit or miss but, they seem to be getting their bearings so either way this will be interesting.

Hawkeye #13 (Marvel) – Clint and Kate in LA on a case. There will be humor, there will be blood, there will be awesome , in the start of what looks like a killer story arc.

 

Brett

Top Pick: A Small Revolution (Soaring Penguin Press) – A revolution in a small country seen through the yes of an innocent child. If there’s ever been a comic more geared towards me, I don’t know what it is. The concept sounds amazing and I can’t wait to read it.

Black Lightning: Cold Dead Hands #2 (DC Comics) – The first issue was a perfect balance of action, characterization, and social justice. Hope this issue continues that trend.

Captain America #696 (Marvel) – The first issue was good (not great) but Mark Waid and Chris Samnee seem to be exploring what it means to be Captain America. What they have to say should be interesting and both know the character well, so this should be an interesting read no matter what.

The Consultant #1 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – When superheroes screw up, this is the guy who cleans up the mess. I’ve read the first issue and while there’s some slight issues with characters standing out in design, the story is fantastic and exactly what I hoped for.

Winter War (Caliber Entertainment) – The story of the 100-day war of Finland versus the Soviet Union at the dawk of World War II. Sounds really interesting.

Preview: Hawkeye #13

Hawkeye #13

(W) Kelly Thompson (A) Leonardo Romero (CA) Julian Totino Tedesco
Rated T+
In Shops: Dec 06, 2017
SRP: $3.99

FAMILY REUNION Part 1
Can L.A. really handle TWO HAWKEYES? Just as Kate reaches out to ask for Clint’s help with finding her dead mother, Clint shows up needing help of his own. An unknown party is gunning for him and it kicks off a chase across Los Angeles with two Hawkeyes trying to stay one step ahead, fully alive, and with minimal property damage…well, okay, with moderate property damage. Re-united and it feels so good!

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow. What are folks getting? What are you excited for? Sound off in the comments below!

Hollywood Reporter – ‘Watchmen’: Why Damon Lindelof Wanted to Tackle Alan Moore’s Graphic Novel – A good question.

ComicMix – Ed Catto: Fighting the Trend, a Retailer Expands – Great to see someone expanding.

 

Review

The Beat – Doomsday Clock #1

Newsarama – Doomsday Clock #1

CBR – Doomsday Clock #1

Atomic Junk Shop – The Egyptian Princesses

CBR – Hawkeye #12

The Beat – Mis(h)adra

Preview: Hawkeye #12

Hawkeye #12

(W) Kelly Thompson (A) Michael Walsh (CA) Julian Totino Tedesco
Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 15, 2017
SRP: $3.99

• Hawkeye’s latest showdown with Madame Masque has left her fed up with clones – and all of the shenanigans surrounding them.
• So when Laura Kinney, the All-New Wolverine, shows up in L.A. on the hunt for a mad scientist bent on creating an army of Wolverine clones, Kate volunteers the services of Hawkeye Investigations.

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