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Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2018

Without further ado, these are my favorite comics of 2018. This was the year I fell back on series that I had been checking out for years and found some new faves in the worlds of newspaper comics, symbiotes, gamma irradiated beasts, and maybe even a choose your own adventure game. Marvel seriously did a 180 this year, and I went from picking zero of their comics on my last year end list to three so well done on their part, and Donny Cates and Al Ewing should receive hefty bonus checks. But, honestly, this list should show you that visual humor, character driven narratives, and weirdness are my things, and I can’t wait to read more comics in that vein in 2019.

Honorable Mentions: Sex Death Revolution (Black Mask), Runaways (Marvel), Assassinistas (IDW/Black Crown), Punks Not Dead (IDW/Black Crown), That one really good issue of Peter Parker, Spider-Man that Chip Zdarsky wrote and drew (Marvel), Gideon Falls (Image)

10.Modern Fantasy  (Dark Horse)

Modern Fantasy is a miniseries about a data entry worker named Sage of the Riverlands, who secretly wants to epic hero or maybe just a curator at a cool museum, and has a penchant for smooching handsome elves. Did Rafer Roberts and Kristen Gudsnuk have access to my most secret thoughts while writing this book? In all seriousness, this comic marries millennial angst and struggles (Dead end jobs, mooching friends, annoying co-workers) with all kinds of fantasy tropes, including urban, high, and good ol’ Lovecraftian. Gudsnuk’s art is both humorous and touching and filled with background details and jokes that reward a close reading. But what makes Modern Fantasy a great comic is the awkward friend group dynamic that Roberts and Gudsnuk craft filled with drama, jokes, a touch of romance, and a final showdown with a fire demon.

9.The Wicked + the Divine (Image)

Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson’s story of young gods and fandom hit some dark bits in 2018 and had plenty of surprises to go with the formalism and “glimpse behind the curtain” of the “Mothering Invention” arc. However, at its best, WicDiv is the story of the girl, who thought she wanted something, and then painfully realized that she didn’t really want it. That girl, of course, is Persephone whose personal journey along with McKelvie’s amazing facial expressions, Gillen’s clever quips, and Wilson’s majestic color palette keeps me returning to this series as it is about to hit its fifth year. Also, the specials were spectacularly glorious in 2018 from the illustrated prose story/murder mystery in 1923 to 1373’s dark piety. Then, there was the absolute bonkers nature of The Funnies  where we find out the origin of Laura’s cracked phone and the Pantheon gets to solve a Scooby Doo mystery courtesy of Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris.

8.  Nancy (Go Comics)

I’ve been doing year end comics lists for five years, and this is the first time I’ve put a newspaper strip on one. However, Olivia Jaimes’ work on Nancy is one of the most hilarious things to come out of 2018. There are her “millennial” gags (Even though Nancy and Sluggo are definitely Generation Z.) about Nancy’s overuse of the Internet or swapping streaming service passwords with Sluggo, who is also “lit”. But she also has a firm grasp on meta-gags and the uniqueness of the comics medium like playing with panel layouts, lettering styles, reusing panels, and then having Nancy make a joke about it. Nancy is truly a ray of sunshine in a dark landscape while still being sarcastic and self-deprecating as hell and shows that even the proverbial old dog of the newspaper comic can learn some new tricks.

7.  “Milk Wars” (DC Comics/Young Animal)

“Milk Wars” really brought the best of DC Rebirth and Young Animal together and was the only Big Two crossover I kept up with in 2018. The series brings together the Doom Patrol, Mother Panic, Shade the Changing Girl, and Cave Carson to fight warped versions of DC Comics heroes, who are under the control of the Retconn corporation. The story is a literal metaphor for how corporations sanitize characters and go for the retread instead of taking risks with iconic characters as Wonder Woman becomes a submissive housewife in her tie-in story from Cecil Castelluci and Mirka Andolfo. “Milk Wars” shows that it’s okay to be a little weird as milk goes bad if it’s left in the bridge past its expiration day. It also features some gorgeous layouts from Aco in the crossover’s first chapter, which was co-written by Gerard Way and Steve Orlando, and he and the artists did an excellent job of melding an indie and mainstream sensibility throughout “Milk Wars”. Also, the story had a real effect on Mother Panic, Cave Carson, and Shade in their solo titles and introduced Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew’s wonderful, yet depressed Eternity Girl character.

6.Venom (Marvel)

Donny Cates, Ryan Stegman, and Iban Coello’s Venom ongoing series is filled with all the fun excesses of the 1990s (Especially in the Venom Annual where James Stokoe shows him going toe to toe with Juggernaut.) and none of its toxicity. The first arc of the series is about Eddie Brock and his symbiote going to war against Knull, god of the symbiotes and a symbiote dragon. This has a terrible effect on him, and Cates carefully uses the symbiote as a metaphor for PTSD while freeing Stegman to draw unhinged heavy metal battles. And this series wasn’t just a one arc wonder as Cates, Coello, and Stegman explore the after effects of the battle with Knull on Eddie’s symbiote and have him confront his father. Plus one of the most underrated Marvel villains, Ultimate Reed Richards aka the Maker pops up for a little bit. This series work because it explores the psychological effects of the symbiote as well as the oozy, shoot-y violent bits.

5.Crowded (Image)

Crowded is a wicked bit of satire with a side of mismatched buddy adventure from the beautiful minds of Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, Ted Brandt, and Triona Farrell. It is about an obnoxious woman named Charlie, who has a $2 million price on her head on an app called Reapr that is basically crowdfunded murder. Luckily, there’s an app called Defendr where Charlie hires a badass, meticulous, and noble woman named Vita to protect her. Stein and Brandt fill each page with oodles of panels, but you are able to follow every action scene, conversation, or Charlie ending up at the club or a bachelorette party even if she has a price on her head. The bounty hunting drives the plot while Sebela uses the quieter moments to develop the personality and relationships of Charlie and Vita as well as some of the “professionals” hunting them. Crowded is a thrill ride, but also looks at the dark, not so altruistic side of human nature through the Internet and constant connectivity.

4. You Are Deadpool (Marvel)

Al Ewing and Salva Espin’s You Are Deadpool was some of the most fun I had reading a comic book in 2018 beginning with Kieron Gillen showing up in the “tutorial” brandishing a sandwich as a weapon. It’s a combination spoof of different eras of Marvel Comics along with a pretty damn fun and addictive Choose Your Own Adventure Game. In some cases, you don’t even read the issues in order. Ewing and Espin also take cues from some not so table top RPGs and have the moral choices that Deadpool makes effect your reading and playing experience. Having Deadpool interact with both heroes and innocent passerbies during the Silver Age, horror/kung fu/blaxploitation, the edgy 80s, and of course, the good ol’ 90s is hilarious and shows Espin’s versatility as a cartoonist.

3. Archival Quality (Oni)

Archival Quality is a spooky graphic novel by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz about a young woman named Cel, who gets a job as an archivist at a medical museum. The comic tenderly explores Cel’s anxiety and depression and unexpected connection with a woman named Celine, who was a patient at the sanatorium that preceded the museum. It isn’t caught up in a fast paced thriller plot, but slowly unveils the mystery while focusing on Cel’s interactions with her boss Abayomi, super rad co-worker Holly, and her declining relationship with her boyfriend Kyle. Archival Quality has real atmosphere, and Steenz creates some fantastic spaces as Cel begins to explore her workplace with its skulls and lack of cellphone service. It is a fantastic story about mental health and relationships through the mystery genre.

2. Giant Days (BOOM! Studios) 

Giant Days continues to be one of life’s true blessings thanks to John Allison, Max Sarin, Liz Fleming, Julia Madrigal, and Whitney Cogar. At this point, we know the characters and their quirks are on fully display, especially when Sarin draws the title because she is a real pro at expressive eyes and touches of surrealism to break up the slice of life. 2018 was full of drama to go with the Giant Days’ comedy as Daisy broke up with her a little too footloose and fancy free girlfriend Ingrid, and Esther missed her shot at being in a relationship with Ed when he begins a romance with Nina, a girl he met while recuperating from a pub related injury. Nina being Australian is the subject of this year holiday’s special, which was a special treat drawn and written by Allison as Ed fends for himself Down Under. Giant Days shows that it’s one of the pre-eminent slice of life comics as it enters its fourth year, and Esther, Daisy, and Susan’s relationships continue to ebb and flow.

1. Immortal Hulk  (Marvel)

I will preface this by saying that the Hulk is one of my least favorite Marvel characters because he’s often used as a simplistic Jekyll/Hyde metaphor. Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, Ruy Jose, Lee Garbett, Martin Simmonds, and Paul Mounts blow that up in Immortal Hulk, which resembles an intelligent horror story rather than a superhero beat ’em up. It’s a road story with Bruce Banner on the run from the monster that comes out, wrecks, and kills when the sun goes down before morphing into a government conspiracy thriller and something more malevolent towards the end. Through cutting narration, Ewing reveals exactly what is going through Banner’s head while Bennett’s art shows the often gruesome effects of his rages. I also like how Ewing humanizes the supporting players from Walter Langkowski, who is struggling with his own monstrous nature to honest reporter Jackie McGee and even his opponent the Absorbing Man.

Immortal Hulk is the best comic of 2018 because it has a compelling plot, is a searing character study of an American pop culture icon, and is an homage to Jack Kirby and Bernie Wrightson while breaking new ground. (See issue 10’s final page.)

Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Aquaman Passes Deadpool 2. Venom Passes Ragnarok.

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.463 billion domestically, $4.191 billion internationally, $6.654 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $5.443 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

It’s not surprising, but Aquaman won the weekend for the second in a row with an estimated $51.6 million and a drop of just 23.5%, the smallest of the DC Cinematic Universe as well as any Marvel Cinematic Universe film. Most DC films drop in the high 60% range in the second week, with Wonder Woman being the exception with the low 40s. Marvel films tend to drop in the mid-50% range in the second weekend. This would indicate that little competition and positive word of mouth are driving the film and DC’s late year gamble is paying off. While the film would fit right in during the summer popcorn film season, this time of year it’s counter-programming to the usual Oscar/adult focused films.

The film has now earned $188.8 million domestically. International earnings is the real story of the film. This past weekend the film earned an estimated $85.4 million from 78 markets to bring its international total to $560 million and a worldwide total of $748.8 million.

The movie is currently third when it comes to worldwide earnings for the DC Cinematic Universe with about $73 million between it and second place Wonder Woman and $125 million between it and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. It will likely pass both by the time its run is over. It still has to open in Italy on January 1 and Japan on February 8.

The film currently ranks as 21st when it comes to worldwide earnings for a film based on comics and passed this year’s Deadpool 2 on the list over the past week.

In fourth place this past weekend was Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse which saw a 11.2% improvement from the previous weekend. It earned an estimated $18.3 million in its third week to bring its domestic total to $103.6 million. Internationally, the film added an estimated $27.4 million from 60 markets to bring that total to $109.6 million and a worldwide total of $213.2 million. The film still has Brazil to open which happens January 10 and Japan on March 28. Interestingly when it comes to earnings, the film has a domestic/international split that’s close to Spider-Man 2 and Spider-Man 3.

This past weekend Venom didn’t chart but earned about $170,000 domestically and $480,000 internationally over the week. The film now stands at $213.2 million domestically and $642 internationally for a worldwide total of $855.2 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten comic based films of all time. It passed Thor: Ragnarok to become #13 for all time.

The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.55x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.83x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second or third worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 75.07% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Once Upon a Deadpool didn’t chart for the weekend but did bring in dollars over the week. It added $239,000 to its domestic total. That total is being added to the original film, Deadpool 2‘s, earnings. Deadpool 2 has earned $324.5 million domestically, $417.1 internationally, and $741.5 million worldwide.

Avengers: Infinity War has gained some more dollars. The film added about $520,000 to its international earnings.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.464 billion
Total International Gross: $4.191 billion
Worldwide Gross: $6.654 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $5.443 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $246.4 million
Average International Gross: $419.1 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $665.4 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $533.5 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

2018 Comic Movie Adaptations Domestic Gross
2018 Comic Movie Adaptations International Gross
2018 Comic Movie Adaptations Worldwide Gross
2018 Comic Movie Adaptations Proft
2018 Comic Movie Adaptations Multiplier

Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Aquaman is #1 Worldwide

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is shaping up to be a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It looks like it’ll top 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.308 billion domestically, $3.996 billion internationally, $6.303 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $5.092 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

Aquaman won the weekend box office hitting the lower end of expectations and earning an estimated $67.4 million over the three-day weekend. When you add in the $4.7 million from the Amazon Prime showings from the previous weekend it stands at $72.1 million domestically. It’s expected to earned around $105 million over its five days which ends on Christmas.

The film received an “A-” CinemaScore from opening day audiences and played to an audience that was 55% male and 58% aged 25 or older. It also has an 86% rating on RottenTomatoes from the audience as of this writing.

The film was #1 worldwide adding $91.3 million from overseas and 70 markets. Its international total now stands at $410.7 million bringing its worldwide total to $482.8 million. The film is tracking higher than previous DC Universe films driven by the foreign box office. It still has to open in Australia, Italy, and Japan which opens February 8.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse dropped to fourth with an estimated $16.7 million to bring its domestic total to $64.8 million. The second weekend dip was 53% which is a bit higher than expected but it also has a lot of competition. The film opened in China debuting at #1 with an estimated $26.1 million. Worldwide the film brought in $38 million internationally and its foreign earnings now stands at $64.8 million. The film opens in Mexico and Italy December 25, Brazil on January 10, and Japan on March 28.

This past weekend Venom didn’t chart but earned about $200,000 domestically and $1.5 million internationally over the week. The film now stands at $213 million domestically and $641.5 internationally for a worldwide total of $854.5 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten comic based films of all time. It passed Thor: Ragnarok to become #13 for all time.

The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.55x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.83x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 75.07% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Once Upon a Deadpool came in at #17 for the weekend dropping from the previous #11. It added $775,000 to its total which stands at $5.7 million. At the foreign box office the film has earned $993,967. Those totals are being added to the original film, Deadpool 2‘s, totals. Deadpool 2 has earned $324.2 million domestically, $417.1 internationally, and $741.3 million worldwide.

Avengers: Infinity War gained some dollars. Avengers: Infinity War added about $500,000 to its international earnings.

Teen Titans Go! to the Movies also adjusted up. Its domestic total now stands at $29.8 million an increase of about $230,000 from the last week’s reporting.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.308 billion
Total International Gross: $3.996 billion
Worldwide Gross: $6.303 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $5.092 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $230.8 million
Average International Gross: $399.6 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $630.3 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $498.4 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

2018 Comic Adaptations Box Office Domestic Totals
2018 Comic Adaptations Box Office International Totals
2018 Comic Adaptations Box Office Worldwide Totals
2018 Comic Adaptations Box Office "Profit"
2018 Comic Adaptations Box Office Multiplier

Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Spider-Verse Sets a Record While Aquaman Dominates Internationally

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is shaping up to be a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It looks like it’ll top 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.207 billion domestically, $3.799 billion internationally, $6.006 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $4.794 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion. 2018 still has Aquaman opening domestically and expanding internationally. That film along with the recent release of Into the Spider-Verse will combine easily for another billion at the box office.

The end of the year is looking pretty good for comic adaptations so far. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse brought in an estimated $35.4 million for the largest three-day animated opening in the month of December.

The film is receiving universal praise from critics and fans with a “A+” CinemaScore from opening day audiences. The audience was 63% male with 41% aged 25 or older.

Internationally, the film brought in $21 million from 44 overseas markets for a worldwide total of $56.4 million on a $90 million budget.

This past weekend Venom didn’t chart but earned about $100,000 domestically and $1 million internationally over the week. The film now stands at $212.8 million domestically and $639.9 internationally for a worldwide total of $852.7 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten superhero films of all time. The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.53x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.83x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 75.04% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Aquaman continued its strong foreign performance where it added 42 markets and brought in an estimated $126.4 million for an international total of $261.3 million. It still has to open in France, South Korea, Germany, Spain, Australia, Ital, and Japan which will go into February 2019.

On Saturday night the film earned an estimated $2.9 million from a single paid sneak preview from 1,225 theaters in North America.

Deadpool 2‘s Once Upon a Deadpool came in at #11 and brought in $2.6 million. This PG-13 re-release will be added to the total for Deadpool 2 which stands at $322.3 million. It was also released in 12 international markets where it brought in about $1 million.

Ant-Man and the Wasp didn’t chart for the weekend but still earned about $25,000 internationally over the past week. It now stands at $216.6 million domestically, $406 million internationally, and $622.7 million worldwide.

The film has not only passed the original domestically (both adjusted and not-adjusted for inflation) but it also has passed it internationally. The film should keeping adding dollars to its total for the next month and is above $100 million over the original. The sequel has a budget of about $32 million more than the original so it’ll need to that to even out profitability.

Avengers: Infinity War gained some dollars. Avengers: Infinity War added about $13,000 to its international earnings.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.207 billion
Total International Gross: $3.799 billion
Worldwide Gross: $6.006 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.794 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $220.7 million
Average International Gross: $379.9 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $600.6 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $468.7 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Celebrate Marvel’s 80th Anniversary with Covers by Phil Noto!

In celebration of Marvel’s 80th Anniversary, Marvel kicks off 2019 with a series of special variant covers, designed by acclaimed superstar artist Phil Noto! Highlighting some of Marvel’s most beloved super heroes, each cover represents a different decade in Marvel’s storied and momentous history – and Marvel is proud to present all 9 covers coming together to create one visually stunning image!

Look for Marvel’s 80th Anniversary variants by Phil Noto on these select titles, starting in January!

1.       Amazing Spider-Man #13

2.       Avengers #12

3.       Captain America #7

4.       Champions #1

5.       Fantastic Four #6

6.       Immortal Hulk #11

7.       Thor #9

8.       Tony Stark: Iron Man #8

9.       Venom #10

Exclusive Marvel Select Venom Figure Is Now at the Disney Store!

The success of the Venom movie has once again shone a spotlight on the Spider-Man villain, who has a long and varied history with the wall-crawler. In celebration of the character’s comic-book origins, Diamond Select Toys and the Disney Store have teamed up to offer a new edition of the Marvel Select Venom action figure, with new parts and accessories, and it’s exclusively at the Disney Store and on ShopDisney.com! 

The Marvel Select Venom Action Figure is based the character’s appearance in Marvel Comics, and measures 7.75 inches tall with 16 points of articulation. It includes three interchangeable heads, each based on published comic book art; three pairs of interchangeable hands; a removable back attachment that can hold two articulated spider legs; and seven additional tendrils of symbiote that can be attached at different locations on Venom’s back attachment and arms.

The figure will be available now in Disney Stores and online at ShopDisney.com. It comes packaged in display-ready Select packaging, with side-panel artwork for shelf reference.

Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Aquaman Nabs Over $93 Million in China

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is shaping up to be a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It looks like it’ll top 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.165 billion domestically, $3.609 billion internationally, $5.773 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $4.758 billion. That’s off of 5 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion. 2018 still has Aquaman opening domestically and expanding internationally, and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse yet to open, as well as the PG-13 recut of Deadpool 2, Once Upon a Deadpool. Those three should easily add another billion to this year’s total.

This past weekend Venom came in at #17 improving one spot from the previous weekend with an estimated $305,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.7 million. Internationally, the film added $7 million over the past week to bring that total to $638.6 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten superhero films of all time. The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.51x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.83x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 75.01% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Aquaman debuted in China two weeks ahead of the domestic release where it earning an impressive $93.6 million. That’s 85% of the total market share for the weekend in China and is the the studio’s largest opening weekend ever in China and the largest industry opening in the market in December. It expands internationally next weekend with 40+ more overseas market including the UK, Russia, Mexico, and Brazil.

Ant-Man and the Wasp didn’t chart for the weekend but still earned about $42,000 internationally over the past week. It now stands at $216.6 million domestically, $406 million internationally, and $622.6 million worldwide.

The film has not only passed the original domestically (both adjusted and not-adjusted for inflation) but it also has passed it internationally. The film should keeping adding dollars to its total for the next month and is above $100 million over the original. The sequel has a budget of about $32 million more than the original so it’ll need to that to even out profitability.

Avengers: Infinity War gained some dollars. Avengers: Infinity War added about $760,000 to its international earnings.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.165 billion
Total International Gross: $3.609 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.773 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.097 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.652 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $270.6 million
Average International Gross: $401 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $641.5 million
Average Budget: $137.1 million
Average Profit: $504.3 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Ralph Rules for a Third Weekend While Aquaman Rocks China

Ralph Breaks the Internet ruled the weekend again for the third weekend in a row bringing in an estimated $16.1 million that brings its domestic total to $140.9 million. Internationally the film earned $18 million to bring that total to $258.2 million after it debuted in Spain.

In second place was Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch repeating in that spot. It earned an estimated $15.2 million to bring its domestic total to $223.5 million. Overseas the film added $25.9 million to bring its international total to $98.9 million and global earnings to $322.4 million.

Repeating in third was Creed II which added an estimated $10.3 million to its domestic total to bring that to $96.5 million. It also brought in $5.2 million from overseas bringing that total to $23.2 million.

Fourth place was also a repeat with Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald adding an estimated $6.8 million to its domestic total to bring that to $145.2 million. It added $22 million to its international box office to bring its global total to $568.5 million.

Rounding out the top five was another repeat, Bohemian Rhapsody which earned an estimated $6 million to lift its domestic total to $173.6 million. Overseas it earned an estimated $29.2 million to bring that total to $423 million and a worldwide total nearing $600 million.

Aquaman debuted in China two weeks ahead of the domestic release where it earning an impressive $93.6 million. That’s 85% of the total market share for the weekend in China and is the the studio’s largest opening weekend ever in China and the largest industry opening in the market in December. It expands internationally next weekend with 40+ more overseas market including the UK, Russia, Mexico, and Brazil.

This weekend also early screenings of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and Bumblebee though neither has seen numbers released. This coming week sees Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse open in 3400+ locations, likely taking first place, as well as Once Upon a Deadpool, the PG-13 version of Deadpool 2, which opens in around 500 locations beginning Wednesday.

In othe comic adaptation news…

Venom came in at #17 improving one spot from the previous weekend with an estimated $305,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.7 million.

We’ll be back in an hour for a deeper dive into this year’s comic film adaptations.

Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Venom Nears $850 Million

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is shaping up to be a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It looks like it’ll top 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.164 billion domestically, $3.508 billion internationally, $5.672 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $4.750 billion. That’s off of 5 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion. 2018 still has Aquaman and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse yet to open as well as the PG-13 recut of Deadpool 2, Once Upon a Deadpool. Those three should easily add another billion to this year’s total.

This past weekend Venom came in at #17 at the weekend box office with an estimated $380,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.3 million. Internationally, the film added $21 million over the past week to bring that total to $631.7 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten superhero films of all time. The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.44x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.82x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 74.85% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Ant-Man and the Wasp didn’t chart for the weekend but still earned about $1,600 internationally over the past week. It now stands at $216.6 million domestically, $406 million internationally, and $622.6 million worldwide.

The film has not only passed the original domestically (both adjusted and not-adjusted for inflation) but it also has passed it internationally. The film should keeping adding dollars to its total for the next month and is above $100 million over the original. The sequel has a budget of about $32 million more than the original so it’ll need to that to even out profitability.

Avengers: Infinity War gained some dollars. Avengers: Infinity War added about $10,000 to its international earnings.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.164 billion
Total International Gross: $3.508 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.672 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $897.1 million
Total “Profit”: $4.750 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $270.5 million
Average International Gross: $438.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $709 million
Average Budget: $128.2 million
Average Profit: $580.8 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

It’s an Animation One-Two as Ralph Tops the Box Office for a Second Weekend

Ralph Breaks the Internet took the top spot at the box office for a second weekend in a row. The film delivered an estimated $25.8 million after three days. The film also added $33.7 million at the international box office. Domestically the film has earned $119.3 million and $87.7 million at the foreign box office for a worldwide total of $207 million.

The number two and three spot switched from the previous week. This week Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch earned an estimated $17.7 million to bring its domestic total to $203.5 million. Internationally the film added 20 markets to make it 53 total. It earned an estimated $27.1 million at the international level and stands at $64.8 million. It still has to open in Mexico, Japan, China, Korea, and Russia.

In third place was Creed II which earned an estimated $16.8 million, a 52.7% drop from the previous week. Its earned $81.2 million domestically. This weekend it also expanded into 29 foreign markets and earned an estimated $10 million for an international total of $11.4 million. It won’t be opening in key intentional markets until the new year expanding throughout January.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald was in fourth place with an estimated $11.2 million and a domestic total of $134.3 million. Internationally it added $40.2 million for a total of $385.3 million and a global total just shut of $520 million.

Rounding out the top five was Bohemian Rhapsody which brought in $8.1 million after five weeks and a domestic total nearing $165 million. Internationally the film added $37 million from 72 markets and a foreign total of $375.1 million and worldwide total of $539.6 million.

When it comes to comic film adaptations…

Venom was #17 at the weekend box office with an estimated $380,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.3 million.

We’ll have a deeper dive into this year’s comic adaptations in an hour so come back to see how this year’s shaping up!

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