Tag Archives: venom

Avengers: Endgame is #1 while Far From Home Nears $1 Billion

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.


2018 wraps up… we think

This past week, no films from 2018 seem to have earned any new dollars so we’re giving it one more week before we consider 2018 wrapped and we report on how the year went.

But, so far…

2018 is a record-setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.697 billion domestically, $4.563 billion internationally, $7.260 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $6.048 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

Here’s where 2018’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.697 billion
Total International Gross: $4.563 billion
Worldwide Gross: $7.260 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $6.048 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $269.7 million
Average International Gross: $456.3 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $726.0 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $672.0 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.


And on to 2019!

In second place was Spider-Man: Far From Home which earned an estimated $21 million after two weekends at the top of the box office. Over the week, the film earned $80 million internationally. Domestically, the film has earned $319.7 million and with $651.1 million internationally, the film is nearing the $1 billion mark with $970.8 million worldwide.

In the biggest news, Avengers: Endgame is now the “all-time top-grossing film” officially passing the mark over the weekend. The film earned $1.2 million domestically over the weekend. Over the week it added around $3 million domestically and $6.4 million internationally. The total now stands at $2.790 billion passing Avatar by about $600,000. This does not factor in inflation in which case neither film is the all-time leader.

Dark Phoenix is still hanging on to the box office earning $183,000 domestically improving to #23 from last week’s #29. The film has earned $65.4 million domestically. Internationally, the film added about $2 million over the week to that total to bring it to $186.4 million and $251.7 million worldwide.

Shazam! also didn’t chart but it too has been earning money over the week. The film added $85,000 domestically to its total to bring that to $140.3 million. Along with its $224 million international earnings, the film has earned $364.3 million worldwide.


Here’s where 2019’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $1.945 billion
Total International Gross: $4.120 billion
Worldwide Gross: $6.065 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.197 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.869 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $243.1 million
Average International Gross: $515 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $758.1 million
Average Budget: $149.6 million
Average Profit: $608.6 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Spider-Man: Far From Home Passes Spider-Man 3 while Avengers: Endgame Inches Closer to the Record

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.


2018 wraps up… or not

It looks like there’s still life when it comes to 2018’s films. Venom, which debuted in October 2018 saw an increase in its international earnings. The film added about $70,000 to its international total. Whether that’s actual dollars in or an adjustment is unknown but it pushes off our final evaluation of the year for another week.

But, so far…

2018 is a record-setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.697 billion domestically, $4.563 billion internationally, $7.260 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $6.048 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

Here’s where 2018’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.697 billion
Total International Gross: $4.563 billion
Worldwide Gross: $7.260 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $6.048 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $269.7 million
Average International Gross: $456.3 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $726.0 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $672.0 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.


And on to 2019!

In what wasn’t a surprise, Sony‘s Spider-Man: Far From Home took first place again, repeating on last week’s performance. The film brought in an estimated $45.3 million which is a 51% drop from the previous week. Domestically the film has earned $274.5 million.

Internationally, Spider-Man: Far From Home added $100 million to bring that total to $572.5 million. When it comes to the international total, the film is in first place, beating Spider-Man 3‘s $554.3 million.

Globally the film has earned $847 million after 17 days. The movie is $33.2 million behind 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming and $43.9 million behind 2007’s Spider-Man 3 for worldwide total.

Avengers: Endgame came in at #12 earning an estimated $1.7 million to bring its domestic total to $851.2 million. It also added $5 million to its international total over the week. It seems like the film is struggling to take the worldwide all-time total despite the “re-release,” but has gotten closer and now stands less than $8 million away from that record.

Dark Phoenix continues to slide coming in at #25 the past weekend. The film added an estimated $189,000 to its domestic total to bring that to $65.1 million after six weeks. The film has shown some life internationally, where it added $3.5 million to that total. With $249.6 million worldwide, the film now ranks #77 for all-time comic films when it comes to grosses.

Captain Marvel isn’t charting but still earning a decent chunk of change. Over the week, the film added $7,000 domestically. Worldwide, the film has earned $1.128 billion.

Shazam! also didn’t chart but it too has been earning money over the week. The film added $135,000 domestically to its total to bring that to $140.2 million. Along with its $224 million international earnings, the film has earned $364.2 million worldwide.


Here’s where 2019’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $1.895 billion
Total International Gross: $4.030 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.925 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.197 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.728 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $236.8 million
Average International Gross: $503.8 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $740.6 million
Average Budget: $149.6 million
Average Profit: $591.0 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Review: Venom #16

Venom #16

Venom #16 does a fantastic job of bridging the gap between the recently ended event “War of the Realms” and upcoming “Absolute Carnage.”

Writer Donny Cates uses the issue to focus on the recent revelation that Eddie Brock is a father. Cates has done an amazing job at adding depth to the character. This issue is a prime example of that.

Eddie doesn’t have access to his symbiote anymore and he has to take care of his newly discovered son. But, that involves money, something Eddie doesn’t have. And, with his son getting sick, Eddie also needs medicine, or at last soup. While he used to have the means to solve those issues, he now has to take another route. That means trying to get a job.

The story is such a simple concept that shows Eddie as a proctor. It also has us questioning who was the bad guy, him or the symbiote. Did one corrupt the other? It also makes his actions as a hero more believable as we get to see him care for his kid.

Cates focuses on that while also teasing the upcoming storyline “Absolute Carnage.” He delivers a creepy storyline that’s brutal in scary in so many ways. We see Eddie do what he has to provide and protect the innocents, even without Venom to help. It creates a character that is multifaceted and more well-rounded.

The art by Juan Gedeon and colorist Jesus Aburtov for Venom #16 is on the nose. It brings a grittiness to the story that fits the tone perfectly. There’s a caring innocence that slowly devolves as Eddie falls deeper into his mission and goal. The detail Gedeon makes sure to add of the bumps and bruises helps you feel that more sorry for Eddie and what he has to do.

Venom continues to be one of Marvel’s best series out there. It has added depth to a character who up to this point lacked any. Venom, and Eddie Brock, has finally gone from a Spider-Man who eats people, to a character you can empathize with. Cates has made me care about the character for the first time and put together an amazing focus on character, action, and big picture storytelling.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Juan Gedeon
Color: Jesus Aburtov Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.35 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Venom #16

With the War of the Realms over, Eddie Brock attempts to move on with his life as Absolute Carnage is right around the corner. An excellent issue bridging the two storylines.

Story: Donny Cates
Art: Juan Gedeon
Color: Jesus Aburtov
Letters: Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops starting July 10! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

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Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Spider-Man: Far From Home Sets Records while Avengers: Endgame Inches Closer to the All-Time Record

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.


2018 wraps up…

With no films from 2018 grossing dollars in the past week, it looks like the year is finally wrapping up. If no film earns any money in the next week, we’ll officially call it and post our roundup and dive looking at 2018 compared to previous years. But, so far…

2018 is a record-setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.697 billion domestically, $4.562 billion internationally, $7.259 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $6.047 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

Here’s where 2018’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.697 billion
Total International Gross: $4.562 billion
Worldwide Gross: $7.259 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $6.047 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $269.7 million
Average International Gross: $456.2 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $725.9 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $671.9 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.


And on to 2019!

There was no doubt Spider-Man: Far From Home would win the weekend box office. The film had the largest six-day opening ever for a Tuesday release with $185.1 million. The film helped the top 12 films outperform the same weekend last year, the first time in four weeks this has happened.

The film earned about $91 million in its first three days and then topped that over the weekend bringing in another $93.6 million. That’s the 22nd largest six-day performance of all-time. It also earned the largest Tuesday opened day ever and second widest opening ever with 4,634 locations.

Far from Home is outpacing Spider-Man: Homecoming for the six days by over $30 million. It shouldn’t be a surprise the movie is a hit as it earned an “A” CinemaScore from opening crowds and a high rating online. The opening weekend crowd was 60% male and 42% aged 25 or older.

Internationally, the film earned $244 million from 66 markets to bring its overseas total to $395 million so far. Already the movie has earned $580.1 million worldwide off of a $160 million budget.

Avengers: Endgame dropped 49.3% to come in at #9 this past weekend. The movie added $3.1 million to its domestic total to bring that to $847.9 million. Internationally, the film earned $4.6 million over the past week bringing that total to $1.925 billion. Worldwide, the film has earned $2.772 billion.

The move to re-release the film with an extended scene gave the movie a boost but may not put it over the top of all-time worldwide box office leader of Avatar. It’s still about $16 million short. There’s still a chance it’ll break the record but it’ll be close.

Dark Phoenix continues its slide coming in at #15 with an estimated $439,000 to bring its domestic total to $64.6 million. Internationally, the film earned just $5,000 over the past week. There it has earned $181.1 million for a worldwide total of $245.7 million. The film moved up to #79 for worldwide earnings passing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, 2003’s Hulk, and 2014’s Hercules.

Captain Marvel isn’t charting but still earning a decent chunk of change. Over the week, the film added $37,000 domestically and $60,000 internationally to bring those totals to $426.8 million and $701.4 million. That’s a worldwide total of $1.128 billion.

Shazam! also didn’t chart but it too has been earning money over the week. The film added $84,000 domestically to its total to bring that to $140.1 million. Along with its $224 million international earnings, the film has earned $364.1 million worldwide.


Here’s where 2019’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $1.802 billion
Total International Gross: $3.848 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.649 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.197 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.453 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $225.2 million
Average International Gross: $480.9 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $706.2 million
Average Budget: $149.6 million
Average Profit: $556.6 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Preview: Venom #16

Venom #16

(W) Donny Cates (A) Juan Gedeon (CA) Joshua Cassara
Rated T+
In Shops: Jul 10, 2019
SRP: $3.99

After weeks on the run and battling the monsters of Asgard through the WAR OF THE REALMS, Eddie Brock finally has a moment to catch his breath. But without his symbiote, getting even the basic necessities will become a challenge for Eddie Brock. Which means that keeping his son, Dylan, alive will be too!

Venom #16

Messages from Midgard Finale: The Good and Bad of War of the Realms

Just when you thought you’d seen the last of me, here’s another installment of “Messages from Midgard“. This isn’t a column length analysis of Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #46, which was the final “War of the Realms” tie-in to come out although I will mention Ryan North, Derek Charm, and Rico Renzi‘s hilarious and clever work with Doreen Green and the Norse squirrel god of chaos Ratatoskr later. No, I have come to survey the wreckage of “War of the Realms” and sift out what worked and what didn’t as well as the memorable moments and the comics that will gather dust in the quarter/dollar/whatever currency inflates to bin at the comic cons and stores of the future.

Without further ado, here’s “War of the Realms: The Good and the Bad“.


The Good

1. Thor’s Character Arc

The core War of the Realms series was at its finest when Jason Aaron remembers that he and Thor have been on a seven year journey together, and this event is the climax. Sure, the montages of Fire Goblin and Frost Giant destruction, superheroes making inane Tolkien and DnD quips, and Punisher shooting Elves are fun. However, the series clicks when it focuses on Thor feeling guilt for the death of the Valkyries and Loki, going on a berserker rage, returning with one arm, and then making sacrifices to not just become a hero, but the All-Father of Asgard. Tom Taylor does a good job enhancing this main narrative in his Land of the Giants tie-in where Wolverine tells his teammates to let Thor let his berserker rage burn out and kill Giants before he is ready begin the next step of his journey.

Despite the continent and realm spanning tie-ins and some issues in the middle, which feel like trailers for more interesting comics with cool battles, Jason Aaron and Russell Dauterman craft a robust arc for Thor. They also make a great one for Jane Foster too as she evacuates New York, takes on the role of All-Mother in Freyja’s absence, wields War Thor’s helmet, and finally becomes the new Valkyrie. Superhero comics are all about the illusion of change, but it’s cool to look back and see a damsel-in-distress nurse battle cancer, become the goddess of Thunder, revoke that mantle, and find new ways to be heroic in War of the Realms. Basically, people who started reading comics in the 2010s will only see Jane Foster as a hero thanks to the work of Aaron, Dauterman, and Matthew Wilson.


Image result for russell dauterman war of the realms

2. Russell Dauterman and Matthew Wilson’s Visuals

All my high-falutin’ words about responsibility, heroic journeys, and mythology aside, at its core, War of the Realms is a no holds barred good guys vs bad guys superhero throwdown except with fantasy baddies instead of the usual costumed villains. And this is all thanks to the art of Russell Dauterman and the colors of Matthew Wilson. Dauterman is like a modern day Art Adams (Who did the covers for War of the Realms) or George Perez and possesses a singular gift for splash pages with multiple characters and making them compositions that tell a story instead of glorified pinups. He excels at both layouts and character designs using the newly omniscient Daredevil as the reader’s POV on the action of the War of the Realms while coming up with cool riffs on characters like Odin’s Iron Man armor, Malekith becoming engorged by the Venom symbiote, or Freyja going full Vanir witch on Malekith and his minions.

Matthew Wilson really is the secret weapon throughout the “War of the Realms” event with his work on the core miniseries as well as issues of Thor and the Daredevil serial in War Scrolls. His colors are the ingredient that put the Frost in Frost Giants, the Fire in Fire Goblins, and the effects he uses in War of the Realms #6 make the storm caused by the four Thors truly cataclysmic. But his work isn’t all chaos and Kirby krackle, and there’s delightful minimalism to the big scenes like the reforging of Mjolnir or Daredevil gazing from above that cause one’s eye to linger on the panel and reread the issues that he has colored and that Russell Dauterman has drawn again.


3. Humor-Driven Tie-Ins

The “War of the Realms” tie-ins aren’t at their best when they’re trying to make serious points about the effects of war, like Dennis Hallum and Kim Jacinto did in War of the Realms Strikeforce: The War Avengers. They do work when they lean into the fun and lore of superhero comics and events. For example, in Superior Spider-Man, Gwenpool comments on the well-worn structure of event comics and how a B-Lister like Doc Ock doesn’t get to strike the final blow against Malekith, and in Skottie Young and Nic Klein’s Deadpool, the titular character fights trolls with the help of Australian stereotypes and the event’s single funny Lord of the Rings joke. There is also a great short story in War Scrolls #2 by Anthony Oliveira and Nick Robles where Loki (in disguise as Kate Bishop) and Wiccan go to drag brunch.

However, the two tie-ins that take the cake in the comedy department and are also fun road stories are The McElroys and Andre Araujo‘s Journey into Mystery and the aforementioned Unbeatable Squirrel Girl. Most of the humor in Journey into Mystery comes from character idiosyncrasies, like Miles Morales not knowing what to do in a casino because he’s never left Brooklyn or Death Locket’s obsession with Westerns because those were the only movies her Life Model Decoy “uncle” had programmed. The jokes also come out of the wacky situations that the ensemble cast finds them in from a Skrull trailer park to a literal Western ghost town and a henchman convention.

In Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Ryan North, Derek Charm, and Rico Renzi send the titular character on a mission from Loki to take out the Frost Giants’ secret base in Canada. On the way, she gets a cute new costume from her mom, sees two Frost Giants make out, reads Robert Frost poetry on her own, and builds an unlikely friendship and alliance with Ratatoskr, a Norse squirrel deity that is tricksy even for Loki. North’s script continues to be joke-dense and full of fun facts about science and the world around us while insightfully showing Squirrel Girl at her conflict-avoiding and problem-solving finest. Her actions even have an effect on the larger event, and Derek Charm’s art continues to be heckin’ cute.


4. Standalone Character Studies

Jason Aaron plays some good 3D chess by using War of the Realms to tell the big, loud story of Malekith’s invasion and Thor finding confidence in himself again and his other titles Thor and Avengers to tell quieter (Sometimes) character studies and hint at big plans after the War. So, we get stories like Loki being visited by his past and future selves while being digested in his father’s stomach, a tale of Gorilla-Man’s day to day role at the Avengers HQ during a crisis situation, and She-Hulk dealing with people’s (and by extension readers’) perceptions of her and how she really wants to be. They provide a fresh outlook on the events of the War of the Realms that isn’t just omniscient narration or Thor’s quest.

Avengers #18-#20 end up pulling double duty by introducing the Squadron Supreme of America as well as fleshing out the aforementioned Gorilla-Man and She-Hulk and setting up future plans for Aaron’s works in the Marvel Universe. The Squadron is a great satire of nationalism with a bit of trolling towards the DC Universe, and Aaron wisely puts them in an ancillary book to not detract from “War of the Realms”. The same goes with Gorilla-Man, who is in cahoots with the imprisoned Dracula meaning that the King of the Damned still has a role to play in this book’s events. And none of this is mentioned in the core War of the Realms mini, who only spends a solitary panel setting up Marvel’s next event “Absolute Carnage” as Venom slithers away from Malekith’s Necrosword. It’s nice to enjoy the ride/event you’re on before thinking about the next one.


The Bad

5. Mediocre Minis

Most Big Two events have three to six issue miniseries to add depth to major supporting characters, give B-list heroes a showcase, or just to make money. Sadly, most of “War of the Realms'” minis were more miss than hit with the exception of Journey into Mystery and the anthology series War Scrolls. I also personally liked the end of War of the Realms: Punisher and its portrayal of Frank Castle as a defender of innocents and unrelenting executioner of criminals even if it didn’t connect to his portrayal in the event possible.

However, the rest of “War of the Realms'” minis were either untapped potential or just plain stinkers. New Agents of Atlas introduced a new team of Pan-Asian superheroes, but became overwhelmed by its ensemble cast and its intriguing character designs didn’t translate well to its interior art. Giant-Man had a madcap concept of Marvel’s size-changing heroes taking out the “source” of the Frost Giants, Ymir. But it went off the rails by its third issue with a villain who was shoehorned in and an artist that was really bad at staging and establishing scenes.

Spider-Man and the League of Realms had a cool concept of Spider-Man leading representatives from the other nine realms into battle, but it constantly changed settings, switched bad guy/threat on the fly, and like New Agents of Atlas, didn’t make me care enough about its ensemble cast. The worst tie-in of all was War of the Realms: Uncanny X-Men which had a decent premise of the X-Men defending New York, but shoehorned in awkward connections to Norse mythology, killed off Sunspot for no reason and had no focus even though Sabretooth would have made a great villain. Thankfully, it will probably be all retconned when Jonathan Hickman begins his X-Men run.

If you stick to the core miniseries plus the Thor, Avengers, War Scrolls, Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, and Journey into Mystery tie-ins (I can also vouch for Cullen Bunn’s work on Asgardians of the Galaxy and Venom.), “War of the Realms” is a good time. First and foremost, it works as an event because it’s a culmination of seven years of work that Jason Aaron has done with Thor, Jane Foster, Odin, Freyja, Asgard, and the non-Midgard Realms instead of trying to tie into an MCU movie. In fact, much of the current MCU Thor’s arc seems inspired by the work that Aaron has done throughout his run.

Avengers: Endgame Closes in on Avatar

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.697 billion domestically, $4.562 billion internationally, $7.259 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $6.047 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

It looks like 2018’s films have stopped bringing in money so we’ll give it one more week and then do our overall dive into how the year ranked.


The big news over the past week was the “rerelease” of Avengers: Endgame. The movie got a boost expanding into 2,025 locations, an increase of 1,040. The film added an introduction from director Anthony Russo, an unfinished deleted scene, and a sneak peek of Spider-Man: Far From Home. estimates had the film earning $2.5 million. It exceeded that, earning an estimated $5.5 million over the weekend. That’s an increase of 178.5% from the previous week. Internationally the film added $5 million over the week.

Domestically, the film has earned $841.3 million. Internationally, the film stands at $1.920 billion for a worldwide total of $2.761 billion. The “rerelease” is a ploy to topple Avatar as the top grossing film of all time (though it still wouldn’t be when you take into account inflation). The move has closed the gap though and stands now just $26.7 million away from becoming the “top grossing” film worldwide.

Dark Phoenix continues its slide coming in at #13. The film added $1.7 million to its domestic total for the weekend bringing that to $63.6 million after four weeks. The movie also earned $8.3 million internationally over the week. That total stands at $181.1 million for a worldwide total of $244.7 million. The movie has passed Batman & Robin to become #80 when it comes to worldwide grosses for a comic adaptation.

Captain Marvel isn’t charting but still earning a decent chunk of change. Over the week, the film added $38,000 domestically and $6,000 internationally over the week to bring those totals to $426.8 million and $701.4 million. That’s a worldwide total of $1.128 billion.

Shazam! also didn’t chart but it too has been earning money over the week. The film added $160,000 domestically to its total to bring that to $140.0 million. It film also added $600,000 to its international total to increase that to $224 million. Worldwide, the movie has earned $364 million.

We’re still waiting for 2018’s films to wrap up their earnings. Aquaman saw a boost of $200,00 in its international total. Domestically, the film has earned $335.1 million, $812.9 million internationally, and $1.148 billion worldwide.


Here’s where 2018’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.697 billion
Total International Gross: $4.562 billion
Worldwide Gross: $7.259 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $6.047 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $269.7 million
Average International Gross: $456.2 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $725.9 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $671.9 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Dark Phoenix Continues to Flame Out Domestically But Shows Life Internationally

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It has topped 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.697 billion domestically, $4.562 billion internationally, $7.259 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $6.047 billion. That’s off of 10 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion.

It looks like 2018’s films have stopped bringing in money so we’ll give it one more week and then do our overall dive into how the year ranked.


Dark Phoenix dropped to #9 from last week’s #5. The film earned $3.6 million, a drop of 61.5% as it shed 1,1667 theaters. Domestically, the film has earned $60.2 million after 3 weeks and most likely will be the lowest grossing X-film domestically. Internationally, it’s a different story. The movie added $20 million over the week to bring that total to $172.8 million. That beats the original X-Men film from 2000. X2 and X-Men Origins: Wolverine earned $192 and $193 million which puts Dark Phoenix in range to pass both of those. Unless a miracle happens, the film will likely be the worst performing X film worldwide since they began to be released in 2000.

Avengers: Endgame came in at #13 earning an estimated $1.9 million after 9 weeks. The film has earned $834.5 million domestically. The film also added $3.1 million internationally to bring that total to $1.915 billion. Worldwide the film has earned $2.750 billion.

Captain Marvel isn’t charting but still earning a decent chunk of change. The film added $230,000 domestically and $5,000 internationally over the week to bring those totals to $426.8 million and $701.4 million. That’s a worldwide total of $1.128 billion.

Shazam! also didn’t chart but it too has been earning money. The film added $214,000 domestically to its total to bring that to $139.8 million. Along with its $223.4 million internationally, the film has earned $363.2 million worldwide.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film has an average gross to the budget for a DC Cinematic film and will likely remain in the middle of the pack for that. It remains the lowest grossing big-budget DCU film and is unlikely to change that. Still, it’s hard to call the film a failure with its return on its budget.


Here’s where 2018’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.697 billion
Total International Gross: $4.562 billion
Worldwide Gross: $7.259 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.187 billion
Total “Profit”: $6.047 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $269.7 million
Average International Gross: $456.2 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $725.9 million
Average Budget: $131.9 million
Average Profit: $671.9 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Around the Tubes

Clue: Candlestick #2

We spent the weekend at the ALA Conference and will have our thoughts later in the day (it was amazing). It was an amazing experience celebrating books, comics, libraries, and more! While you wait for that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Kotaku – Streamer Raises Almost $1 Million For Charity In Just Four Hours – Not comic related but great to see this.

New York Post – Ex-employee of famed comic shop accused of swiping $50K in merchandise – That’s not good.

Queensland Times – Comic book drug plot alleged ringleader in court – This has been fascinating to learn about.

CBR – Venom 2: Sony Confirms Sequel is Happening, Tom Hardy Returning – The first made a ton of money. Of course it’s returning with Hardy!

Reviews

Newsarama – Captain America #11
AIPT! –
Clue: Candlestick #2

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