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Review: Eternity Girl #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got a new series from DC’s Young Animal.

Eternity Girl #1 is by Magdalene Visaggio, Sonny Liew, Chris Chucky, Todd Klein, Paulina Ganucheau, Maggie Howell, and Andy Khouri.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFW

 

DC Comics​ provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Preview: Eternity Girl #1 (of 6)

Eternity Girl #1

Story: Magdalene Visaggio Art: Sonny Liew
Color: Chris Chucky Letterer: Todd Klein
Editor: Andy Khouri Assistant Editor: Maggie Howell
In Shops: Mar 14, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Caroline Sharp has been a lot of things, including both a superhero and a super-spy. But now, with those days behind her and her powers proving unreliable, Caroline finds herself stuck in a life weighed down by her depression and an inability to change. You see, Caroline is going to live forever, and there is no escape to be had. The very act of living reminds her that, to the rest of existence, she is an anomaly. All of that could change, however, when her old foe, Madame Atom, comes to her with an intriguing offer. Madame Atom can give Caroline the power to end her life; she just has to destroy the rest of the world.

This brand-new DC’s Young Animal miniseries spins out of the Milk Wars event, written by GLAAD Media Award-nominated writer Magdalene Visaggio (Kim and Kim) and illustrated by Eisner-winning artist Sonny Liew (The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye).

Preview: Batman: White Knight #6

Batman: White Knight #6

Story: Sean Gordon Murphy Art: Sean Gordon Murphy
Color: Matt Hollingsworth Letterer: Todd Klein
Editor: Mark Doyle Assistant Editor: Maggie Howell
In Shops: Mar 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Gotham City’s strongest alliance comes to an end when Gordon’s trust in Batman reaches its limit. On the verge of resignation, the commissioner attempts a final act of public service, but an unlikely intervention allows the Dark Knight to fight another day. Meanwhile, Jack’s mission takes a hit when his pills lose effect-and under cover of all this chaos, Neo Joker is positioned to take the city hostage.

Review: Catalyst Prime: Kino #1

Major Alistair Meath of Britain’s Royal Air Force sacrificed his life to save Earth from an approaching asteroid on the night of “The Event”. Seven months later, Meath has resurfaced as the colorful, kinetic energy-powered superhero KINO, but something is very wrong with the world. Britain’s MI6 is on the hunt for Meath, and the terrible secret behind his return is revealed in this mindbending thriller within the Catalyst Prime Universe.

Lion Forge‘s “Catalyst Prime” has given us a lot of familiar and new types of characters often playing off of comic history to deliver entertaining reads and create a new superhero universe. Written by Joe CaseyCatalyst Prime: Kino #1 is the latest entry and delivers the universes Superman-ish type character, or at least that’s what it seems at first glance.

It’s clear Casey is having fun with tropes and the genre in this series, and that’s evident from the two distinct stories he tells and the art delivered by Jefte Paolo, with color by Chris Sotomayor.

One half of the comic is Major Alistair Meath origin as Kino from his catastrophic space flight to his body being held for experimentation. That involves secret organizations and corrupt corporations. While that could be standard in some ways, what’s interesting is the comic splits about half way through.

Casey gives us a battle of Kino against an evil doppleganger in a style that’s retro in both the panels, but also the art and coloring. Even Todd Klein‘s lettering shifts to give a throwback vibe to it all. This split is what makes the comic really interesting presenting Kino no longer as the tool being fought over but instead the traditional hero along the lines of Superman.

It’s an interesting choice in presentation and gives a good idea as to who he would be as a hero. It’s clear that Casey is going to explore some traditional superhero tropes as the series moves forward.

The story is interesting but it’s that flip in art that’s really impressive. The comic feels like a modern take on a classic comic in every way but with a cool style about it all. I’d take a comic just of that any day of the week. Palo’s art is fantastic as a whole with character designs that are engaging and stand out. This is a case where the art make the comic.

A new entry in the Catalyst Prime world is great to see and this one is another unique one for the universe. A first issue that has me interested in seeing where it all goes and hoping we get more of that retro art.

Story: Joe Casey Art: Jefte Palo
Color: Chris Sotomayor Lettering: Todd Klein
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Lion Forge Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

NYCC 2016: Talking Lion Forge’s Catalyst Prime with Joe Illidge

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Ever since Lion Forge announced a new line-up of hires, it’s been a company to watch. You don’t bring on that sort of talent without having a bigger plan and something up your sleeve.

I’ve watched intently parsing every word said by staff and every hint dropped to try and figure out what exactly what was being worked on.

At New York Comic Con, we found out what that was.

At their panel Sunday, Lion Forge announced “Catalyst Prime,” a new superhero universe with a killer amount of talent writing, drawing, coloring, and lettering, and diversity on the page and behind the scenes. But, impressively it’s also established and new talent alike working together to create this new world. That’s something that’s important for the company, to bring together old and new voices.

Along with the creative talent it was announced that Desiree Rodriguez is joining the company as an editorial assistant for the new line. Rodriguez is a freelancer for Nerds of Color who wrote this fantastic piece about being Latinx in comics.

Before the panel, I got to speak with Senior Editorial Manager Joe Illidge and got the details as to what we can expect.

Graphic Policy: It’s been months of teasing and hints and I know I’m excited to hear the details. What’s the scoop as to what Lion Forge has announced at New York Comic Con 2016?

Joe Illidge: We’re announcing the creation of a new superhero universe which will be under the title of “Catalyst Prime.” There will be seven monthly books and the line will launch in May of 2017.

GP: Who’s the talent that’ll be involved that you can announce?

JI: For the kick off book it’s going to be mainly written by Christopher Priest, co-written by myself with the art by Marco Turini, letterer Deron Bennett, and colorist Jessica Kholine. For the first ongoing series with a Black male lead, the writer is Brandon Thomas, artist Ken Lashley, letters by Saida Temofonte, and colorist Juan Fernandez. The second main book about an interracial duo, it’s co-written by David Walker and Dr. Sheena Howard, illustrated by Chuck Collins, and colored by Veronica Gandini. The third book is written by Joe Casey, illustrated by Damion Scott, lettered by Janice Chiang, and will be colored by John Rauch. The fourth book will be a team book written by Joe Casey with story consultation by Ramon Govea who created the concept, illustrated by Larry Stroman and Rob Stull, and colored by Snakebite Cortez. For the fifth title with a British male lead which is a science fiction thriller, it’ll be written by Joe Casey, illustrated by Jefte Palo who is well known for illustrating the Black Panther Secret Invasion storyline in which the Wakandans held back the Skrull invasion, it’ll be colored by Chris Sotomayor, and lettered by a legendary letterer. The letterer of the Hugo award winning Sandman Overture graphic novel, Todd Klein. The sixth title with a White male lead will be written by Alex De Campi, illustrated by Pop Mhan, and lettered by Deron Bennett. Deron Bennett is doing a bunch of DC “Rebirth” books. One prominent one is Batgirl. The seventh title with a lesbian lead character will be written by Amy Chu, illustrated by Jan Duursema, colored by Kelly Fitzpatrick, and lettered by Deron Bennett.

GP: That’s impressive you can remember and name all of them. So what can you tell us specifically about the series?

JI: Well basically the whole universe is started from an asteroid heading to Earth and a private corporation called the Foresight Corporation, which produced our teaser memo, they send four astronauts on a suicide mission to stop the asteroid. What happens leads to the emergence of super humans on our world. After that, most of the books will take place one year after that.

GP: As far as the comics, how are they kicking off, a mini-series and then everything launches from there?

JI: It’s going to start with a one-shot co-written by Christopher Priest and myself, coming out the first week of May 2017. And then we’ll be rolling out the books from there, from May through December.

GP: That’s an amazing group of talent working on the comic that’s very diverse, what about the characters?

JI: The characters are diverse. Of the four astronauts, you have two women, one of whom is lesbian, one of whom is Black. The two men, one is Black and one is British. The other three are American. Then there’s also a Chinese woman who is part of mission control who is supervising the mission in space, but was not one of the four astronauts.

GP: That certainly is diverse. When putting the series together, was this a priority and thought through?

JI: It was thought through in the sense that the owner David Steward II, the President Geoff Gerber, and I are really committed to creating a universe that invites everyone. Diversity is a buzzword that has become obsolete because it’s been used for a lot of PR. Diversity should be intrinsic if you have an expanded mindset and worldview so when you’re going to creators they’re not all heterosexual, they’re not all Caucasian males. They might not all be from the United States. They’re from different industries. They have different political backgrounds. Diversity is automatic. But we want to create something new and exciting that doesn’t have a burden of decades of continuity. We want everyone to feel invited to this world and this world will evolve into a world that will more accurately reflect the demographics of the one that we live more than a lot of other fictional superhero comic universes.

GP: When it comes to the writers… there’s a habit lately that writers are pigeonholed into what they write based on the color of their skin or their gender, in November out of 13 female writers for the big two only one was writing a comic with a male lead as an example, are you breaking that mold?

JI: I am breaking that mold. The book that is going to have the latino teenager lead is going to be written by Joe Casey whom is neither Latino nor a teenager. But, Joe Casey has clearly been an advocate for variety in superhero comic books, in creator owned comic books. And frankly he’s the co-creator of America Chavez. To me, that right there, America Chavez is one of the most beloved Latinx characters of our time. So I’m comfortable with him writing a Latinx character considering he created one of the most popular ones right now.

GP: He’s shown he can do it.

JI: Exactly.

GP: One of the things that caught my eye in your teases was a woman writing a male character, so it’s either Dr. Sheena Howard, Amy Chu, or Alex De Campi.

JI: What it is, the book that will be co-written by David Walker and Dr. Sheena Howard is an interracial team book written by a man and a woman featuring a man and a woman. That really came down to whom I feel David and Sheena are as people. Due to their academic backgrounds. Due to their vast social and cultural knowledge. Due to the fact they are both social crusaders, they are expertly qualified to tell this story.

Amy Chu is going to be writing a story about a Caucasian lesbian. Alex De Campi will be writing a story with a white American male lead. So you don’t have to keep these straight lines. Some of them won’t be straight for the sake of being straight. I really tried to see who were the best creators to tell these stories book by book.

GP: With the baggage that comes with continuity and years of stories, are you thinking through that as you put together this universe and series? A perfect example is Valiant that has continuity but you can read just one series, step into a new story arc, there’s clear starting points, or you can enjoy it all.

JI: Absolutely. No two books will be alike aesthetically. We want readers to be able to read a book and not feel like they are trapped or tricked into reading other books. If you read other books and you keep moving forward, you start seeing connected threads, and you get the benefit of the worldview of this entire thing. If you choose just one book, or two books, or four books, you can have individual experiences and as we look forward to the first crossover event, which will probably take place in 2018, that will be a story in of itself. If you choose to keep reading your book, you can do that. It’s very important for us that the reader not feel interrupted in the book, or books, that they like. It’s also important that when we collect these books we really want to engage the book market. We want to create volumes where a new reader can pick up any volume and get into that world. Whether it’s across titles or whether they pick up volume two of any series and we hope that they don’t feel like that have to pick up volume one but instead that they’ll want to pick up and read volume one.

It really comes down to characters. Characters are the underpinning of all stories. We want to create characters that the readers will care about. We want you to come along on the journey with these characters. So, by defining the characters, making them compelling, and making them relatable, is the ultimate way that we can invite readers, old and new, into the universe.

GP: Is the universe set in our world or slightly off? Do we get fake countries or ones that actually exist?

JI: It’s going to be our world geographically, all the identifications will match up to Earth. I look at this as the love child of Darwyn Cooke’s DC New Frontier and Vertigo Year One and the brilliance of Karen Berger in using Animal Man, Doom Patrol, Shade, the Changing Man, Black Orchid, and Kid Eternity as the foundation for a truly imaginative and impressive body of books. These will be super hero genre books, but they’ll also engage in other genres like science fiction, techno thriller, young adult, action adventure, teen adventure, social drama, so that is how I see it. For that to be the case, it had to take place in a world like ours.

GP: Since it is taking place in a world familiar to ours, there’s the debate as to whether comics should just be entertainment or if it should touch upon social justice issues being waged. Will the comics touch upon real world issues? From the characters and what you’ve described it sounds like social issues will be a natural thing for the series, but is it a goal and point?

JI: You know, we don’t see it as a hard agenda. It’s not something we’re going to beat the audience over the head with as far as the stories. When you’re talking about social justice, art has always been a vehicle for social justice.

GP: Comics always have.

JI: Exactly. We’re at a time where we are vulnerable in so many other areas. Our bodies are vulnerable. We’re being told what bathrooms we can use. We have political icons engaging in reprehensible behavior, xenophobia, and sexism. Art may be one of the last frontiers that is bullet proof. If you’re going to do a universe, and you’re going to engage the super hero and what the super hero can do, how can you not engage in social justice?

GP: How long has this been in the works?

JI: It’s funny, there has been different stages. I started working at Lion Forge in June and I really expanded it. The origins of the “Catalyst Prime” super hero universe starts with the owner of Lion Forge, David Steward II. As someone highly influence by Milestone, we are obviously simpatico on that front, myself being a Milestone alumni, Geoff Gerber the President of Lion Forge being an advocate for social justice, the three of us together really wanted this to be something special that would invite everybody. It started with the owner, but when I came in I took the nucleaus and put together a team of writers. We did a writers retreat where we all sat down in a room and spent a day and basically nurtured this universe to life and that kind of creativity, that imaginative osmosis, the results of that are really going to be seen in the books. You’re going to see us subvert some familiar archetypes. You’re going to see some characters of ethnic backgrounds that you never thought you’d equate with roles of power. We’re really looking to give you the kind of familiar things you want with super hero comic books, but we want to return fun and imagination to super hero comic books.

It feels like right now we’ve hit a critical mass in terms of cynicism, in terms of doubt, in terms of dissapointment, for the faith and investment of time we have given. I want this super hero unvierse be a return to fun and imagination and the consumer being rewarded for their time and love of this genre and this medium.

GP: With starting a comic line now, it feels like it’d be different because it’s no longer just print you’re dealing with. There’s digital, there’s mobile, there’s web, the avenues and distribution is so different. Is that in your thoughts in putting it together, looking at the big picture and how different people will interact differently with the material?

JI: Absolutely. It’s very important for us that anyone who wants to get our books will be able to get our books. Whether it is comic book stories in the direct market. Whether it’s book stores and collections in the trade market. Whether it’s digital. We have been looking at a lot of metrics and data in regards to digital comics. Some of those discoveries will impact how we put together and provide these books. And it’s very important to us that if you’re unfortunately living in a place that’s a comic store desert, you can still get the book. It’s important to us that if you feel there’s a local environment that’s not welcoming to you as a consumer that you can still get our book. It’s important to us that we engage in a discussion with retailers and consumers about pre-ordering so that we expand the vocabulary and help consumers get our books.

GP: Any final thoughts?

JI: It’s exciting for us to start this new thing. I think culturally that we are at a high point of the popularity and the agency of the super hero as a genre and so there’s no better time to start a new universe than right now. I firmly believe, and the creators that I’ve assembled, we all firmly believe that ultimately people want good stories. It’s not about what genre it is. It’s about good stories and good characters.

Review: Shame Trilogy

shametrilogycoverThe Shame hardcover collects all three parts of writer Lovern Kindzierski (Tarzan), artist John Bolton (Books of Magic), and letterer Todd Klein’s (Sandman) fantasy saga featuring archetypical characters such as Virtue, Shame, and Slur. It is a beautiful, dark, twisted fantasy story (Apologies to Mr. West.) and a true showcase of Bolton’s talents as a watercolor artist even if its gender politics are of an older age with plenty of gratuitous ass shots and creating kind of a virgin/whore dichotomy between Shame, who enjoys sex, and Virtue, who is innocent and “pure”. The three graphic novels  tell a tale as old as time about the battle between light and darkness with a messed up family dynamic caught in between. Think Electra complex as Shame transforms her mother Virtue from a happy nun into the receptacle of her demon spawn child.

Even if I didn’t really connect with the characters in the Shame trilogy, the world that Kindzierski and Bolton have created is quite captivating as they combine elements of Grimm Fairy tales, old Red Sonja comics, Heavy Metal Magazine, and C.S. Lewis/George MacDonald type allegories to craft a unique world of beautiful nymphs, creepy rhyming shadows, and constantly perturbed peasant population. Bolton is skilled at showing both the beautiful and the grotesque as the nymphs that Virtue sends to protect her daughter Shame from her evil father Slur and his minions have a celestial, Pre-Raphaelite vibe with spring colors following through their bodies. But eventually, as Shame begins to grow into her evil birthright, they become twisted like Slur and his minions. The first volume “Conceptions'” color palette also gets progressively darker and sexier as Shame seduces an Incubus to get human semen and have her mother Virtue reborn as a child so she can imprison her like Virtue did to her as a child. Again, the family dynamics of this comic are quite messed up.

When Bolton goes grotesque, it is quite a treat. His design and Todd Klein’s lettering for Slur and the Shadows forshameinterior are reminiscent of the work of The Maxx‘s Sam Kieth as well as that artist’s early horror-tinged work on The Sandman. Kindzierski adds to the eeriness of these creatures by giving the Shadows rhyming dialogue recasting this fairy tale trope in a horror setting. Bolton makes them silhouettes, which contrasts greatly with the photorealism of his figures and the richness of his background setting whether it be the woods or a ruined castle. They twist and bend and are easily his most sequential work. Their and Slur’s pliable shape show that they are willing to do whatever it takes to rule the entire world through violent and manipulative means as their effect on Shame, Virtue, and the world around them can be felt stronger during each volume of the story.

Kindzierski and Bolton excel at beginning each volume with a strong, distinct start without piling up unnecessary exposition to explain the time gaps between each one. Sometimes, a simple costume change will suffice as Merritt, the “Chosen One”/white knight character, looking more like Louis XVI in the zenith of his decadence instead of Sir Lancelot or even Westley from Princess Bride. Or they can plunge the readers into an immersive action sequence like the start of “Pursuit” where Virtue, who is now a young woman dressed as a hybrid of Red Sonja and Leela from The Fifth Element is on the run from Shame’s goons. There is a lot of leaping and dynamism in Bolton’s art as she evades monsters and finds shelter. She represents rugged survival in the face of great evil while Shame is pure decadence in her dominatrix threads.

Except Virtue doesn’t end up saving the day. In Shame‘s third volume “Redemption”, Kindzierski and Bolton fall into the old cliches of a male chosen one character saving the day even if he has been portrayed as a naive nincompoop up to this point. Merritt makes Frodo Baggins or First Year Harry Potter look like Seal Time Six as he decides to lose his armor and warhorse before wandering into some mysterious thorns. He also completely falls for the fact that Shame says she’s oppressed by her father Slur when she’s actually in cahoots with him. In “Pursuit” and “Redemption”, it seems like Kindzierski is deconstructing these cheerful hobbit type heroes that save the day for some reason or another and will let the ultimate survivor/magical badass Virtue. Except she gets the weird pregnancy/magic light plotline while Merritt freaks out about blood and gets to wield the magic sword. Bolton excels at showing Merritt’s struggles and his doughy body compared to the beautiful forms of Shame and Virtue, but the character is heroic just for the sake of the plot and really has annoying personality and zero street or any kind of smarts. And somehow he gets to be the big damn hero.

Iffy gender politics and fantasy cliches aside, the Shame trilogy is the pinnacle of painted comics storytelling as writer Lovern Kindzierski sets artist John Bolton loose on this fantasy/horror/fairy tale landscape and uses a variety of water color and brush techniques to depict everything from beautiful women and fashionable, sexy outfits to sinister eldritch beings and creepy castles. The comic is a true testament to his captivating imagination, and the ending teases a new character with loads of potential.

Story: Lovern Kindzierski Art: John Bolton Letters: Todd Klein
Story: 6 Art: 10 Overall: 8 Verdict: Buy

Renegade Arts Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

‘Black Hammer’ #1 is a strong, smart, intriguing beginning

black_hammer1Black Hammer #1 already establishes the potential for a very special story. Jeff Lemire has steadily been writing a wide range of fantastic titles over the last couple of years and it looks like Black Hammer will be yet another one to add to the pile of hits. He firmly plants throughout the issue a confident understanding of each of the unique characters, as much as they are a mish mash of The Avengers and Justice League respectively; originality is something that perhaps Lemire is jabbing at with the superhero genre.

A team of superheroes find themselves living together on a large piece of farmland, stranded there for ten years. The Golden Age of their time as superheroes, saving the lives of Spiral City, is a thing of the past. Abraham Slam revels in the repetitions of the everyday farm chores, Barbalien, a shapeshifting alien from Mars, regrets his past self, Col. Weird drifts between reality and the Para-Zone as if affected by some sort of superhero PTSD, Talky-Walky, a robot, constructs a probe in search of rescue from their current lives, Golden Gail, now stuck and angrily so, in the body of a nine year old reminisces about the glory days, and Madame Dragonfly idly bides her time by conversing with crows. There is little information learned about each of the characters but there is a real, heavy sense of the past weighing heavily on each and every one.

There is a great conversation between Gail and Barbalien that encapsulates how the former heroes either miss their golden glory days or are glad to talk of those times in the past tense. As they sit on the top of their house on the farm, Gail asks Barbalien (or, Barbie, as she calls him) if he misses the golden days. Barbalien responds by saying: “Oh, I don’t know. Sometimes. But the way you miss old friends you haven’t seen in years. You know that if you went back, it wouldn’t be the same as it was.” This moment really captures the transition that took place in the Modern Age of comics as a whole, especially affecting the way super hero comics were approached. Perhaps the changes that took place were and are a good thing. Often it can become toxic to hold too tightly to a past that has its nostalgic value but remains in the past for a reason. Black Hammer also does an excellent job through its art style at showing the differences.

Dean Ormston’s artwork is fairly heavy on its line work, drawing attention to the lines on peoples’ faces and clothing to provide a real sense of texture. It’s almost like a combination between Steve Dillon and Frank Quitely, though Ormston’s faces feel more worn and weathered through his distinct style. Ormston also does a consistent job at drawing water spots on tables, cracks on wood within the barn, dirt and rust on Abraham’s truck and a general sense of worn environments to really get the sense of a lived-in world in which time has affected not just the people living within it.

Dave Stewart’s colouring, as it usually is, is the real standout to this comic thus far. Stewart’s paralleling of colour palettes perfectly connects with this deconstruction of the superhero genre and how time has affected it aesthetically. The present time is coloured with more colder, muted browns and greys, giving off a real serious, melancholic and almost sentimental tone to the heroes who have found contempt and acceptance. The past, Golden Age of the super hero battles, shown in brief flashback panels, appear with very bright, punchy yellows, blues and reds. These prominent colours do appear in the present through the spacesuit of Col. Weird, the skin of Barbalien, the door of the farm house and even as a blue flame under a pan of eggs and bacon that Talky-Walky is frying up, yet, are more diluted. Whether this is an intentional commentary on the tired super hero genre within comics (perhaps even their Hollywood adaptations) or not, it is an aesthetically pleasing choice that fits the tone of this title.

Todd Klein, lettering legend, is one of the best in business at using his fonts and word balloon choice to add a further layer to specific characters. Talky-Walky’s green balloons (matching with his lime green helmet) and font are rigid, suitable for a robot that weighs heavily on cold, hard facts. Col. Weird’s balloons and text are shaky and rough, making it seem like if his voice could be heard it would crack and mumble. Its additionally suitable that these two characters just so happen to have once been bonded as a duo.

Black Hammer begins with a very somber tone that strikes directly at the ticking heart of super hero comics and looks to break down a few tropes along the way. The creative team has crafted a very strong beginning with some well put together characters and an array of questions that builds towards a curious final few pages.

Black Hammer #1

Illustrated by Dean Ormston

Colours by Dave Stewart

Written by Jeff Lemire

Lettering by Todd Klein

Published by Dark Horse Comics

Story: 9 Art: 8.5 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Baltimore Comic Con 2013: Harvey Awards Winners

This past weekend was Baltimore Comic Con 2013 and with it the 2013 Harvey Awards. The awards were named in honor of the late Harvey Kurtzman, the cartoonist and founding editor of MAD magazine.

The full list of nominees can be found below, with the winners in bold.

Congratulations to all the winners!

BEST LETTERER

Joe Caramagna, DAREDEVIL, Marvel Comics
Chris Eliopoulos, COW BOY: A BOY AND HIS HORSE, Archaia
Todd Klein, FABLES, DC Comics
Jack Morelli, ARCHIE, Archie Comics
Chris Ware, BUILDING STORIES, Pantheon

BEST COLORIST

Laura Allred, FF , Marvel Comics
Matt Hollingsworth, HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
Tito Pena, ARCHIE, Archie Comics
Ed Ryzowski, GUTTERS, the-gutters.com
Fiona Staples, SAGA, Image Comics

BEST SYNDICATED STRIP or PANEL

CUL DE SAC, Richard Thompson, Universal Press Syndicate
DICK TRACY, Joe Staton and Mike Curtis, Tribune Media Services
GET FUZZY, Darby Conley, United Feature Syndicate
MUTTS, Patrick McDonnell, King Features
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE, Stephen Pastis, United Feature Syndicate

BEST ONLINE COMICS WORK

BANDETTE, Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover, http://www.monkeybraincomics.com/titles/bandette/
BATTLEPUG, Mike Norton, http://www.battlepug.com
THE DREAMER, Lora Innes, http://www.thedreamercomic.com
NIMONA, Noelle Stevenson, http://gingerhaze.com/nimona
SHELDON, Dave Kellett, http://sheldoncomics.com

BEST AMERICAN EDITION of FOREIGN MATERIAL

ABELARD, NBM
BLACKSAD: A SILENT HELL, Dark Horse
NEW YORK MON AMOUR, Fantagraphics Books
SHARAZ-DE: TALES FROM THE ARABIAN NIGHTS, Archaia
NAOKI URASAWA’S 20TH CENTURY BOYS, VOL. 22, VIZ Media

BEST INKER

Steve Ellis, ONLY LIVING BOY, Bottled Lightning
Jonathan Glapion, BATMAN, DC Comics
Klaus Janson, CAPTAIN AMERICA, Marvel Comics
Mark Morales, AVENGERS VS. X-MEN, Marvel Comics
Bob Smith, LIFE WITH ARCHIE, Archie Comics

BEST NEW SERIES

ADVENTURE TIME, KaBOOM! Studios
HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
NEW CRUSADERS: RISE OF THE HEROES, Red Circle Comics
REVIVAL, Image Comics
SAGA, Image Comics

MOST PROMISING NEW TALENT

Jerry Gaylord, FANBOYS VS. ZOMBIES, BOOM! Studios
Dennis Hopeless, AVENGERS ARENA, Marvel Comics
Ryan Jampole, MEGA MAN, Archie Comics
Mark Mariano, Happyloo, MyPalMark.com
David Nytra, THE SECRET OF THE STONE FROG, Toon Books

SPECIAL AWARD FOR HUMOR IN COMICS

Chad Lambert, THE POSSUM AT LARGE 10TH ANNIVERSARY CRAPTACULAR, Old School Comics
Ryan North, ADVENTURE TIME, KaBOOM! Studios
Dan Parent, KEVIN KELLER, Archie Comics
Chris Sparks, TEAM CUL DE SAC: CARTOONISTS DRAW THE LINE AT PARKINSON’S, Andrews McMeel
Jim Zub, IMAGE COMICS, Skullkickers

BEST ORIGINAL GRAPHIC PUBLICATION FOR YOUNGER READERS

ADVENTURE TIME, KaBOOM! Studios
AMELIA RULES: HER PERMANENT RECORD, Simon and Schuster
COW BOY: A BOY AND HIS HORSE, Archaia
DRAMA, Schoolastic
SUPERMAN FAMILY ADVENTURES, DC Comics
THE SHARK KING, Toon Books

BEST GRAPHIC ALBUM PREVIOUSLY PUBLISHED

ALIEN: THE ILLUSTRATED STORY, Titan Books
ARCHIE: THE MARRIED LIFE, BOOK 2, Archie Comics
CURSED PIRATE GIRL COLLECTED EDITION: VOLUME ONE, Archaia
HEADS OR TAILS, Fantagraphics
KING CITY, Image

BEST ANTHOLOGY

DARK HORSE PRESENTS, various, Dark Horse
DISTRICT COMICS, Matt Dembicki, Fulcrum Publishing
ONCE UPON A TIME MACHINE, Andrew Carl, Dark Horse
TEAM CUL DE DE SAC: CARTOONISTS DRAW THE LINE AT PARKINSON’S, Chris Sparks, Andrews McMeel
WOMANTHOLOGY: SPACE, Mariah Huehner, IDW

BEST DOMESTIC REPRINT PROJECT

BEST OF ARCHIE COMICS, VOL. 2, Archie Comics
CAME THE DAWN AND OTHER STORIES, THE EC COMICS LIBRARY, Fantagraphics
CRIME DOES NOT PAY ARCHIVES, Dark Horse Comics
DAVID MAZZUCHELLI’S DAREDEVIL BORN AGAIN: ARTIST’S EDITION, IDW
POGO: BONA FIDE BALDERDASH VOL. 2, WALT KELLY’S POGO, Fantagraphics

BEST COVER ARTIST

David Aja, HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
Steve Ellis, ONLY LIVING BOY, Bottled Lightning
Jenny Frison, REVIVAL, Image Comics
Adam Hughes, FAIREST, Vertigo Comics
Fiona Staples, SAGA, Image Comics

BEST BIOGRAPHICAL, HISTORICAL, or JOURNALISTIC PRESENTATION

ALTER EGO MAGAZINE, TwoMorrows Publishing
JACK KIRBY COLLECTOR, TwoMorrows Publishing
TEAM CUL DE DE SAC: CARTOONISTS DRAW THE LINE AT PARKINSON’S, Andrews McMeel
MARVEL COMICS: THE UNTOLD STORY, HarperCollins
ROBOT 6 WEBSITE, Comic Book Resources

SPECIAL AWARD for EXCELLENCE IN PRESENTATION

BUILDING STORIES, Chris Ware, Pantheon Books
CURSED PIRATE GIRL COLLECTED EDITION: VOLUME ONE, Jeremy Bastian, Archaia
DAVID MAZZUCCHELLI’S DAREDEVIL BORN AGAIN: ARTIST’S EDITION, Scott Dunbier, IDW
TEAM CUL DE DE SAC: CARTOONISTS DRAW THE LINE AT PARKINSON’S, Chris Sparks, Andrews McMeel
THE ART OF BETTY AND VERONICA, Victor Gorelick and Craig Yoe, Archie Comics

BEST GRAPHIC ALBUM ORIGINAL

BUILDING STORIES, Pantheon
THE CARTER FAMILY: DON’T FORGET THIS SONG, Abrams ComicArts
MY FRIEND DAHMER, Abrams ComicArts
RICHARD STARK’S PARKER: THE SCORE, IDW
THE UNDERWATER WELDER, Top Shelf

BEST CONTINUING OR LIMITED SERIES

BATMAN, DC Comics
DAREDEVIL, Marvel Comics
HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
LOCKE AND KEY, IDW
RACHEL RISING, Abstract Studios
SAGA, Image Comics

BEST WRITER

Matt Fraction, HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
Joe Hill, LOCKE AND KEY, IDW
Tim Seeley, REVIVAL, Image Comics
Scott Snyder, BATMAN, DC Comics
Brian K. Vaughan, SAGA, Image Comics
Mark Waid, DAREDEVIL, Marvel Comics

BEST ARTIST

David Aja, HAWKEYE, Marvel Comics
Greg Capullo, BATMAN, DC Comics
Mike Norton, REVIVAL, Image Comics
Chris Samnee, DAREDEVIL, Marvel Comics
Fiona Staples, SAGA, Image Comics

BEST CARTOONIST

Jaime Hernandez, LOVE AND ROCKETS: NEW STORIES, Fantagraphics
Jeff Lemire, THE UNDERWATER WELDER, Top Shelf
Terry Moore, RACHEL RISING, Abstract Studios
Chris Ware, BUILDING STORIES, Pantheon
Adam Withers and Comfort Love, RAINBOW IN THE DARK, uniquescomic.com

BEST SINGLE ISSUE OR STORY

BATMAN # 12, DC Comics
BUILDING STORIES, Pantheon
HAWKEYE # 1, Marvel Comics
LOCKE AND KEY: GRINDHOUSE, IDW
THE MIRE, BeckyCloonan.net
SAGA # 1, Image Comics
TALES DESIGNED TO THRIZZLE #8, Fantagraphics

Preview – The Loxleys and the War of 1812 from Renegade Arts Entertainment

THE LOXLEYS AND THE WAR OF 1812 GN

Writer: Alan Grant
Artist: Claude St. Aubin
Colorist: Lovern Kindzierski
Letterer: Todd Klein.
Editor: Alexander Finbow
Publisher: Renegade Arts Entertainment
Diamond Code: APR121209
ISBN-13: 9780986820007
Pages: 176 (101 pages of story and 53 page summary of the warm written by acclaimed Canadian military historian Mark Zuehlke, presented with maps and illustrations)
Price: $19.99
Release Date: June 6th, 2012

The story follows the Loxleys, a Canadian family living in the Niagara peninsula as they’re torn apart by the American invasion of Canada in 1812, and the subsequent war that raged across both countries as British troops, Canadian militia, and First Nation warriors sought to thwart the expansionist plans of the American government.

The story follows the characters through key historical events as they deal with the realities of war on their doorstep, the personal loss, setbacks and victories tied into the conflict.

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