Tag Archives: skybound

Negan Lives this July to Benefit Comic Retailers

The New York Times bestselling, award-winning creative team behind The Walking Dead Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard — returns to the beloved series for a surprise one-shot story, Negan Lives #1, which will arrive in stores this July.

This shipment arriving in July will be without financial burden to receiving retailers—with no freight cost for them to worry about.

In the announcement, Kirkman said:

I’ve been inspired by Steve Geppi and Diamond’s efforts to shine a light on how essential the Direct Market is to our beloved industry with their #backthecomeback campaign. While Charlie Adlard and I had laid the series to rest, this felt like something special we could do for the store owners who made our series a success to begin with. To that end, I’m happy to report that 100% of the revenue generated from this book will go to the stores selling it. The retailer community does backbreaking work to get comics into the hands of our loving fans, we should all be doing more in these trying times to show them how appreciated they are.

Negan Lives #1 will not be available digitally and will be available exclusively at comic book shops. Fans interested in ordering a copy can find the comics store closest to them on Local Comic Shop locator. Many comic book shops are fulfilling orders online and via curbside pickup.

Spurned by a slowly rebuilding society, Negan lives a life of desperate isolation… or does he? In the tradition of Here’s Negan, this all-new story in Negan Lives #1 gives readers a glimpse into what has happened to one The Walking Dead‘s most popular characters in the time since his last appearance in The Walking Dead #174.

As long-time readers of the post-apocalyptic survival series will recall, The Walking Dead #174 proved to be a pivotal point for Negan, as he was tracked down and confronted by a vengeful Maggie, still heartbroken and furious over the murder of her husband, Glenn, in The Walking Dead #100.

Negan Lives #1 (Diamond Code MAR208199) is a 36-page, black and white comic book, available exclusively at comic book shops on Wednesday, July 1. There are extremely rare Gold (Diamond Code MAR208201) and Silver (Diamond Code MAR208200) foil variants of Negan Lives #1 in limited quantities, inquire with your local comic shop for availability and further details.

Negan Lives #1

Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin’s The Walking Dead: The Alien Gets a Hardcover Release in July

Image Comics and Skybound Entertainment have announced that the popular Panel Syndicate story The Walking Dead: The Alien by Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin — which spins out of bestselling phenomenon The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard —will be available in oversized hardcover this July.

This stunning hardcover features a story firmly set in The Walking Dead comic book continuity by Vaughan and Martin and includes never-before-seen designs, sketches, and layouts.

Originally released in digital format on Panel Syndicate and printed as an oversized single issue exclusively and in limited quantity for Local Comic Shop Day, this The Walking Dead: The Alien story will be available widely and in hardcover for the first time ever.

The Walking Dead: The Alien by Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin (ISBN: 978-1-5343-1659-1) will be available on Wednesday, July 29 and in bookstores on Tuesday, August 4.

The Walking Dead: The Alien

Help Support the Book Industry Charitable Foundation and Get the Entire Run of The Walking Dead

The Walking Dead

Skybound, Image, and Humble Bundle have a fantastic bundle of DRM free digital comics. You can get the entire run of The Walking Dead for just $18. There’s $454 worth of comics.

The pay-what-you-want format allows you to pledge certain amounts for different tiers and $18 or more gets you everything.

You can designate how much goes to Humble Bundle, the publisher, or to the charity, the Book Industry Charitable Foundation (BINC).

BINC has expanded its mission to help book stores and comic stores during these times. BINC’s assistance varies depending on the needs of retailers. BINC is focused on helping with expenses such as medical or personal household.

There’s a little over 20 days for you to purchase it and take advantage.

Below are what you get with each tier:

Pay $1 or more:

  • The Walking Dead Free Comic Book Day
  • The Walking Dead volume 1 to 5

Pay $8 or more:

  • The Walking Dead volume 6 to 13
  • The Walking Dead Survivor’s Guide

Pay $15 or more:

  • The Walking Dead volume 14 to 23

Pay $18 or more:

  • The Walking Dead volume 24 to 32
  • The Walking Dead: All Out War: AP Edition
  • The Walking Dead: Here’s Negan!

Review: Stealth #1

Stealth #1

Stealth is a hard read, as is the case with most stories dealing with mental illness. It holds nothing back as it takes a measured look at the dynamics between a father and son struggling to make sense of a particularly rough psychiatric condition. Of course, everything’s made harder when it’s revealed the father’s a superhero that can confuse innocents with criminals due to his mental state. Needless to say, this comic lands as hard as a punch to the gut—and then some—and it has every intention of saying something important about the subject matter.

Written by Mike Costa and illustrated by Nate Bellegarde Stealth centers on a Detroit-based black superhero—the titular Stealth— as he faces a crisis-like challenge: Alzheimer’s. His son, reporter Tony Barber, is already aware of the situation, just not of the fact his dad is a superhero. That is until he walks in on his dad in full hero getup, looking as if lost in his own home. From there we get to the central question of the story: should Stealth be taken out of the superhero game, even if it means leaving a crime-riddled Detroit without its protector?

Costa and Bellegarde do a great job of balancing classic superhero tropes with the metaphors and messages surrounding the overarching narrative, which is driven by Stealth’s condition. They seem to be aware of the importance of not letting the mental illness factor drown out the superhero element, and vice versa. One of the ways they do this is by mixing tried and true superhero traditions in order to shape them into something easily recognizable.

Stealth is basically a combination of Sam Wilson’s Falcon, Batman, and a hero’s burning need to save a city. Daniel (Stealth’s real name) wears each influence on his sleeves. Some of Sam Wilson’s influence can be found in Stealth’s suit, a high-tech winged suit that looks like it was taken from one of the most recent iterations of the character in the current Marvel universe.

That he is a black superhero, though, opens up a whole slew of racial politics that can make their way into the treatment the character’s alter ego, especially when considering Detroit’s actual track-record with the black population. It feels as if the city will stand for something more than just another innocent worth saving.

Image Comics

In fact, echoes of Batman come through with the comic’s surprising focus on the city of Detroit itself. Costa and Bellegarde take every chance they get to show just how important Stealth is to the city and its continued safety. You get the sense that benching Stealth in this story would be as catastrophic as taking Batman out of Gotham. This is magnified by Bellegarde’s designs for Stealth. He’s always presented as a towering figure, a superior agent of justice.

And yet, that same degree of care that’s afforded to the hero’s presence is then flipped to ramp up the tension surrounding the situation. Once we’re made aware of Stealth’s diagnosis, the story’s emotional spectrum opens up and we’re left with a heartbreaking portrayal of a man that can end up doing a lot of damage in his attempts to do good. Costa’s script does wonders in putting the reader through a revolving door of emotions that makes one scared for the hero but also for those that can get badly swept up in his path. Again, what would happen if Batman could no longer distinguish friend from foe?

Tamra Bonvillain’s colors add to this play of superheroes tropes and mental health representations by going for the spectacular during action scenes, on one hand, to then going for a more restrained touch for the more intimate sequences. It makes everything blend in organically as it essentially guides readers through the multiple metaphorical worlds contained in the comic with smooth transitions. The colors here set the tone and then account for each change in it.

Both versions of Stealth, new version on the left, original version on the right.

It should be noted that Stealth is based on a Robert Kirkman and Marc Silvestri comic that sticks to many of the same storytelling beats of the original story but with some key changes. Kirkman and Silvestri’s Stealth is a white man and his son is navigating what appears to be a recent divorce. This changes the dynamic quite a bit. Skin color can ultimately dictate the feel of the story, whether it wants to or not, and the expectations that come with black characters in terms of representation are already felt throughout Costa and Bellegarde’s Stealth.

Additionally, I consider Costa and Bellegarde’s Stealth to have a much better hold on pacing. Costa’s script pulls off a brilliant gamble with misdirection early on that focuses on the son and the real identity of Stealth, leading to a reveal that was very well orchestrated. Kirkman’s script lets you in on most of the story’s secrets early on and, as a result, doesn’t feel as profound as it does in the new version. It’s still an interesting read, but I prefer Costa’s and Bellegarde’s take.

Stealth #1 presents a world of conversation starters regarding mental illness, hero worship, and straight up comic book storytelling. It’s a story about checking in with our heroes to know when they’ve reached their limit and when to flip the roles to take care of them. It’s about a kind of responsibility we need to own up to more than we actually do.

Script: Mike Costa Art: Nate Bellegarde Colors: Tamra Bonvillain
Story: 10
Art: 10
Recommendation: Buy, and get ready to shed a tear or two

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a free copy for review.

Outer Darkness/Chew #1 Gets a Second Printing

The highly anticipated Outer Darkness/Chew #1 crossover has sold out at the distributer level and Image and Skybound has fast-tracked a second printing (helping?) to combat the fandom hungry pains.

Tony Chu is a modern-day cop who gets psychic impressions from what he eats. Joshua Rigg is a 28th-century starship captain who flies through an outer space filled with demons, monsters, and ghosts. Sounds like a perfect recipe for a comic book crossover, don’t it? Join the fun with Outer Darkness/Chew #1.

Outer Darkness/Chew #1, second printing (Diamond Code JAN208957) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 1.

Outer Darkness/Chew #1, second printing

Review: Outer Darkness/Chew #1

Outer Darkness/Chew #1

There’s something special about crossovers between non-superheroes comics. Usually, a Marvel or DC crossover comes with expectations of event-like conflicts and big action set-pieces. Creator-owned crossovers, on the other hand, tend to live and die by the strength of their characters and the culture they carry from their own comics. This is definitely the case with Outer Darkness/Chew #1, from John Layman, Afu Chan, and Rob Guillory, a coming together of sci-fi, horror, and comedy of epic proportions from two books that rival each other in terms of the sheer storytelling madness they produce.

The comic starts with the crew of the Charon (from Outer Darkness) engaging with a Cibulaxian alien ambassador that only engages in conversation over food. No external communicator can help in the situation and the chef responsible for comms meets a gleefully violent and premature end early on. The captain of the Charon, Captain Rigg, is then forced to resort to plan B: traveling in time to bring Tony Chu in, a Cibopath that can dive into the memories of the things he eats (from Chew).

Outer Darkness/Chew #1 requires prior knowledge of both series to fully appreciate. Writer John Layman, who wrote both series, basically says as much in his letter to the fans at the end of the issue, when he talks about how the book approaches the Chew parts of the book as a kind of coda to the original series (which ran for 60 issues from 2009-2016).

From the Outer Darkness side of the equation, an understanding of the concept is pretty much all you need, which is basically made up of bits from The Exorcist, Star Trek, and Event Horizon. Honestly, I would recommend reading both series as they are very good on their own and are well worth the price of admission. Maybe then come back to the crossover.

The story succeeds in making both the Chewverse and the Outer Darknessverse converge as if they were naturally meant to since their inception. It even makes it a point to recognize changes in how the characters look within the story once they crossover.

Rob Guillory, co-creator of Chew, illustrates his part of the story in the original style of the book with Afu Chan, co-creator of Outer Darkness, doing the same. When Tony Chu is brought aboard the Charon, Afu Chan takes over and the characters acknowledge the change in their looks. They are baffled by it, even.

It’s a bit of meta that builds up the crossover quite well and makes each character recognize the distance between their realities. Chew characters transition well under Chan’s pencils and they still seem like they are from another place, which adds to the clash of stories between the two universes.

Layman’s script does a good job of balancing both worlds, especially in terms of tone. Outer Darkness is a more serious tale than Chew and yet they each keep their identities intact throughout the issue. One’s humor doesn’t drown out the other’s horror. This is something that rarely manages to carry over in this type of story, but Layman pulls it off. Let’s see if it manages to sustain itself over the entire arc.

There’s a lot to like about Outer Darkness/Chew #1, especially for fans of the two series. In fact, I’d say that’s precisely the audience it’s seeking. New readers will probably struggle a bit to make everything click, but there’re still enough things going on in the story that anyone could latch onto and follow. There’s just a lot of fun to be had here, and the promise of more Cibopaths in space is always a good thing.

Script: John Layman Art: Rob Guillory and Afu Chan
Story: 9 Art: 10 Overall: Buy and then read all of Chew

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

John Layman Goes From Chew to Chu

Fans of the New York Times bestselling, multiple Eisner Award winning, beloved humor/crime comic Chew by John Layman and Rob Guillory will be served an all-new spinoff series from Layman, and with art by Dan Boultwood, in the forthcoming Chu from Image Comics. For fans hungry for more—Skybound’s popular Outer Darkness/Chew crossover will be collected into trade paperback and available in July.

New spinoff series Chu promises to be a delectable cat-and-mouse story and will stand on its own for new readers—but delight longtime fans of the Chew universe—and will launch from Image Comics this June.

The

“After more than 60 issues of Chew, it was never a matter of if I would return to the world Rob Guillory and I created, but when. I needed a break after the book ended, but it wasn’t too long after that I started missing the characters and the world, and had the itch to return. It was something I approached cautiously because, while Chew was a complete story, I wanted to return to it in such a way it would be new and say something different, and it took a while to find the right angle. Outer Darkness/Chew was a step in that direction, as well a coda, a flower on the grave that was the story of Tony Chu. Chu is a different take on the Chu family and the Chew-universe, and in many ways it is a mirror, the flip side,” said Layman. “I’m confident readers of Chew will enjoy it, but it’s also something totally new, the story of Saffron Chu, not Tony Chu. She was completely absent from Chew, and this first story arc will tell the story of why that is.”

While Chew’s Tony Chu is a cibopath—able to get psychic impressions from what he eats—Chu’s Saffron Chu is a cibopars—able to learn secrets from who she eats with. Tony is a cop. Saffron is a criminal. They are brother and sister, and they are on a collision course.

The series is a ” different take on the Chu family and the Chew-universe, and in many ways it is a mirror, the flip side.” “It’s also something totally new, the story of Saffron Chu, not Tony Chu. She was completely absent from Chew, and this first story arc will tell the story of why that is.”

Fans won’t want to miss out on this felonious new food noir about cops, crooks, cooks, and clairvoyants.

Chu #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, June 17.

Chu #1 will also be available for purchase across many digital platforms, including the official Image Comics iOS app, Amazon Kindle, Apple Books, comiXology, and Google Play.

Outer Darkness/Chew (ISBN: 978-1534316577) will be available in trade paperback on Wednesday, July 15 and at bookstores on Tuesday, July 21.

Chu #1

Around the Tubes

The Prince and the Dressmaker

The weekend is almost here! What geeky things will you all be up to? Sound off in the comments! While you wait for the weekday to end and weekend to begin, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

The Beat – Jen Wang’s The Prince and the Dressmaker to become a movie musical from the Frozen team – Ooooo!

Newsarama – DC Editor Alex Antone Joins Skybound as Senior Editor – Congrats!

Reviews

Newsarama – Decorum #1
The Beat – The Matrix Comics: 20th Anniversary Edition
CBR – Plunge #1

Dead Body Road Drops the Clutch in May for a New Story Arc, “Bad Blood”

Image Comics and Skybound Entertainment kicks the action into gear with the return of fan favorite miniseries Dead Body Road by Justin Jordan, featuring new series artist Benjamin Tiesma, colorist Mat Lopes, and letterer Pat Brosseau. The action-packed, six-issue series—Bad Blood—will hit comic shops this May and feature covers by Matteo Scalera and Moreno Dinisio.

In Dead Body Road: Bad Blood, Bree Hale has left a lot behind in her life. Crime. The military. But she can’t leave behind her own family, and when the local crime boss puts a hit out on her brother, there’s nothing she won’t do to save him. Absolutely nothing.

John Wick meets Southern Bastards in this pulse-pounding action series—set to deliver an explosive tale of revenge like you’ve never seen before!

Dead Body Road: Bad Blood #1 (Diamond Code MAR200042) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, May 20.

Dead Body Road: Bad Blood #1
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