Tag Archives: shelly bond

Graphic Policy Celebrates Women’s History Month: Our Favorite Women in Comics

patsy walker aka hellcat 1 featuredLogan: Kate Leth, Brittney Williams, Megan Wilson, and Rachelle Rosenberg’s Hellcat has been a joyful celebration of superheroes, young people, and queerness. I will miss its humor, chibi style art, and especially my bi bae Ian Soo when it ends in a couple months.

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Alex: Faith (Valiant) I really can’t understate just how enjoyable this series is. There have definitely been some issues stronger than others, but each and every one in the ongoing series (and preceding miniseries) has been nothing short of a pleasure to read.

Jody Houser, Marguerite Sauvage and the revolving cast of artists have taken Faith to stunning heights in an effortlessly charming and warm series that will make you fall in love with comics all over again.

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Shay: Gail Simone brings me LIFE! As does Roxane Gay! And I’m really loving Amanda Conner and her hubby’s direction for Harley Quinn! Also, loving Marguerite Bennett for the realistic portrayal of lesbians in Batwoman!

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Joe: One of the best titles in the last year is Animosity from Aftershock. This fantastic story is written by Marguerite Bennett who has taken the comic book world by storm lately, and drawn by Rafael de Latorre. Basically, society has collapsed when animals can talk and decide to take over the world from humanity. Instead of a boy and his dog adventure like we’ve seen so many times, we get a girl and her dog. Jesse and her hound, Sandor are not only an awesome pair, but the story is about Jesse’s growth into womanhood without a mother figure. Sandor knows he cannot help like her mother could, but he learns to rely on the other female animals to guide her. It’s brilliant, and everyone should be reading it.

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Patrick: Ann Nocenti’s run on Daredevil blew my mind when it was coming out. It was so different from what I’d been used to seeing from Denny O’Neil and Frank Miller – a strange urban poetry that was as close to magic realism as I’d ever seen in mainstream comics. With an off-kilter humor – the Human Torch showing up in a tight t-shirt reading “Bad!” – twisted romance, and psychodrama. Her writing was like nothing else on the stands.

A huge thanks to the editors and publishers behind the scenes who made a ton of great comics happen: Jenette Kahn, cat yronwode, Diana Schutz, Louise Jones/Simonson, Ann Nocenti, Shelly Bond, Alisa Kwitney, and most especially the inestimable Karen Berger.

Troy: It was a bit short lived, but I think there was a Defender’s title by Cullen Bunn about Valkyrie being tasked with assembling Midgard’s Valkyrie. Fear Itself the Fearless was kind of the prelude series to that. I really would have loved to see this series fleshed out.

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Madison: It’s no secret that I’m obsessed with Monstress and Bitch Planet. They’re not for everyone, but they’re two of my go-to recommendations for people who love science fiction or fantasy. Elizabeth Breitweiser, Rachelle Rosenberg, and Jordie Bellaire consistently blow me away with their incredible colors.

Brett: I’m slightly obsessed with M. Goodwin’s Tomboy which is published by Action Lab: Danger Zone. The series follows a teenage girl whose best friend is murdered in a corrupt cop/conspiracy and she gets posessed by an avenging ghost in a way. Think Kick-Ass but a teenage girl in the lead and a manga influence to it all. An amazing mix of horror, action, and manga the hero Addison is a teenager that can kick ass and get some vengeance.

Shelly Bond Discusses Femme Magnifique LIVE this Monday

femme-magnifique-1Comic-book stories celebrate women who crack ceilings, take names, and change the game. That’s Femme Magnifique, the comic anthology that salutes 30 female trailblazers of yesterday and today currently being Kickstarted featuring a who’s who of comic creators. That’s at least 30 stories from over 50 creators.

From astronauts and abolitionists to computer coders and crack journalists, these fearless women have paved the way for equal rights in science, politics and the arts. What better way to celebrate their achievements than in Femme Magnifique, a book that can live on in teenage bedrooms, corporate boardrooms and libraries around the world?

Joining Graphic Policy Radio to discuss this comic project is the legendary Shelly Bond who will be editing the stories featured.

The show airs LIVE this Monday at 10pm ET.

Shelly Bond has been driven to edit, crush deadlines and innovate since 1988. To date she has edited 950+ comic books and graphic novels by international superstars and novices. One of the most respected and admired editors among her peers, Bond previously served as VP-Executive Editor of DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint. She wields red pens and tap shoes with equal aplomb.

Join us Monday and Tweet us questions @graphicpolicy.

Listen to the show when it airs LIVE this Monday.

Shelly Bond Heads To IDW Publishing

shelly-bondIDW Publishing has announced the arrival of Shelly Bond to its editorial ranks. Bond joins IDW as Senior Editor, Special Projects, and will oversee the new Black Crown imprint. One of the most respected and admired editors among her peers, Bond previously served as VP-Executive Editor of DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint. With over two decades of comic-industry experience to draw from, Bond’s considerable skills and keen eye for talent will pave the way for exciting new projects and original voices.Bond’s passion and enthusiasm for the art form make her a welcome addition to the team. Her previous successes speak for themselves.

black-crownBond’s passion and enthusiasm for the art form make her a welcome addition to the team. Her previous successes speak for themselves. Fables, The InvisiblesSandman: OvertureLucifer, iZombie, and DC’s Young Animal line are just a handful of acclaimed projects which formed under her all-seeing eye.The title “Black Crown” represents not only the name of the creator-owned

The title “Black Crown” represents not only the name of the creator-owned imprint, but also a pub that anchors a mysterious street that connects each creator-owned title. Top creators will tell stories of a singular vision and point of view but will also have the opportunity to intersect with the tapestry of this unprecedented shared environment by way of owning storefront real estate that correlates to their particular creations.

In the release of the announcement, Bond said:

If you know anything about my reputation, you know that I’m selective about story, art, and design. The same applies to a publisher. I can’t think of a better fit for Black Crown than with IDW. They appreciate, share, and champion my vision for creating concepts that are first and foremost incredible, unconventional, and riveting comic books. I can’t wait to announce the impressive coterie of creators, both familiar and next wave, who are working as we speak to bring back the bravado to creator-owned comics.

Stories from the Black Crown Pub will be extensively previewed at July’s Comic-Con International and launch in October 2017.

Femme Magnifique Celebrates Women Who Crack Ceilings, Take Names, and Change the Game

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Femme Magnifique is 30 short stories and over 100 pages celebrating women who crack ceilings, take names, and change the game. Crafted by writers and artists who have been inspired by 30 trailblazers of yesterday and today, Femme Magnifique features stories about women from the worlds of pop music, politics, art, and science. From astronauts and archaeologists to muckrakers and mathematicians, Femme Magnifique will stimulate and educate.

Originally conceived by Shelly Bond, former Executive Editor of Vertigo Comics, Bond explains that “the idea came about immediately after the election. It was the perfect time to take a missed opportunity for women and channel our collective energy into something insightful, full of positivity, that we can pass on to future generations. Femme Magnifique is a graphic novel anthology designed to salute not only the fearless women who toppled the status quo, but also the outstanding writers and artists who infuse their personal stories of ambition and discovery onto the comic book page.”

Along with Shelly Bond, Femme Magnifique’s stories are being curated by Hi-Fi Colour Design founders Kristy Miller and Brian Miller. The husband-and-wife team are no strangers to working with top-tier talent in the comic book industry. Kristy tells us, “We have been lucky enough to work with amazing creators for years, and now we have this opportunity to come together and showcase women in a variety of ways. It takes the support of both men and women to help move women to the forefront, their rightful, equal place.”

Femme Magnifique is being created by acclaimed and best-selling comic book writers and artists including:

Michael and Laura Allred (iZombie, Madman),
David Barnett (Calling Major Tom, The Guardian)
Marguerite Bennett (Animosity, InSEXts)
Corinna Bechko (Star Wars, Invisible Republic),
Aditya Bidikar (The Skeptics),
Philip Bond (Kill Your Boyfriend, The Invisibles),
Tamra Bonvillain (Doom Patrol, Moon Girl, Devil Dinosaur),
Chuck Brown (Rotten Apple),
Paige Braddock (Jane’s World, Stinky Cecil),
Mark Buckingham (Fables) and Irma Page,
Mike Carey (Lucifer, The Girl with All the Gifts),
Cecil Castellucci (Moving Target: A Princess Leia Adventure, Shade, The Plain Janes),
Elsa Charretier (Harley Quinn),
Johnnie Christmas (Angel Catbird),
Jamie Coe (Art Schooled),
Tyler Crook (Harrow County),
Rob Davis (The Motherless Oven, Doctor Who),
Kelly Sue DeConnick (Bitch Planet, Pretty Deadly),
Ming Doyle (Girl Over Paris, The Kitchen),
Chynna Clugston-Flores (Blue Monday)
Kelly Fitzpatrick (Shade, the Changing Girl, Bitch Planet),
Chynna Clugston-Flores (Blue Monday, Lumberjanes/Gotham Academy Crossover),
Tess Fowler (Rat Queens),
Tee Franklin (Nailbiter: The Outfit, Love Is Love)
Karrie Fransman (Death of An Artist, The House that Groaned),
Kieron Gillen (Star Wars: Darth Vader, The Wicked + The Divine),
Che Grayson (Rigamo)
Sanford Greene (Power Man Iron Fist),
Peter Gross (Lucifer, The Unwritten),
Gilbert Hernandez (Love and Rockets),
Betsy Houlton (New York Daily News),
Megan Hutchison (Rockstars),
Tini Howard (The Skeptics),
Lucy Knisley (Relish, Something New),
Eugenia Koumaki (Womanthology),
Teddy Kristiansen (It’s A Bird, The Sandman),
Alisa Kwitney (Token, Convergence: Batgirl, Till the Fat Lady Sings)
Sonny Liew (The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye, Doctor Fate),
Shawn Martinbrough (Luke Cage Noir, Thief of Thieves),
Shawn McManus (Fables, The Sandman)
Leah Moore (Albion),
Kristy Miller (Birds of Prey),
Brian Miller (Harley Quinn, Star Wars, Ziggy Stardust),
Hope Nicholson (The Secret Loves of Geek Girls),
Laurie Penny (The Guardian),
Rori! (100 Women/100 Days) and Gibson Twist (Pictures of You),
Jim Rugg (Street Angel, The Plain Janes),
Steven T. Seagle (It’s A Bird, Big Hero 6)
Paula 7bergen (Window Pains, contributor to Bust),
Alison Sampson (Winnebago Graveyard, Jessica Jones),
Bill Sienkiewicz (Elektra: Assassin),
Gail Simone (Batgirl, Clean Room),
Jill Thompson (Wonder Woman: The True Amazon, Scary Godmother),
Matt Wagner (Grendel),
Gerard Way (Doom Patrol, My Chemical Romance)
Maris Wicks (Science Comics),
Annie Wu (Black Canary)
Ron Wimberly (Prince of Cats),
Marley Zarcone (Shade, the Changing Girl)
and more to be announced…

You can sign up to the Femme Magnifique mailing list today to be notified when the crowdfunding campaign launches.

Around the Tubes

Postal12_CoverAIt’s a new week and we’ve got an exciting one coming up including Captain America: Civil War hitting theaters in the US and Free Comic Book Day! We’re excited here!

And while we await that awesome, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

The Beat – A tribute to Shelly Bond: the most mod editor of them all – Great to see such support.

ICv2 – Artist Joe Devito Suing Warner Bros., Legendary – Interesting considering some comic news.

The Beat – NBC/Universal To Buy Dreamworks Animation: You Won’t Believe What They Own! – If you’re wondering what’s at stake in this deal.

ABC News – Cowabunga! Ninja Turtles Are Official NYC Ambassadors – Fill in joke about only being able to afford to live in the sewers here.

Tales of a Tabletop Skirmisher – Speed Force in the Batman Miniature Game – Can’t wait for this release!

Kotaku – DC Universe Online is available for Xbox One – Pretty cool!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – All-New Wolverine #7

CBR – Amazing Spider-Man #11

CBR – Batman #51

Comic Attack – Postal #12

Parenting DC Comics, and A Rebirth of Ethics

The following is guest commentary by Joseph Phillip Illidge

DC-Comics-logoby Joseph Phillip Illidge

On Wednesday, April 20th, DC Comics announced that Shelly Bond, VP-Executive Editor of its Vertigo division and imprint, had left the company.

You know, “left”.

Additionally, the position of VP-Executive Editor, Vertigo, was being eliminated.

You know, like it never existed. An antimatter wave come from across the multiverse of corporate speak to fill a vacuum by removing the vacuum.

In addition to that megaton bomb being dropped on the comic book industry, the “elimination” of a high-ranking position held by a woman was commented on by two men. Dan Didio and Jim Lee, the Co-Publishers of DC Comics.

The Twitterscape, at the very least, was full of pointed and heated conversation as a result of this announcement.

Three people I know in the industry sent me texts. The texts (mature content warning) read as follows:

“What the hell is DC doing?”

“…DC shredding Vertigo and eliminating Shelly Bond’s job is one of the dumbest moves they could make.”

“It’s like DC enjoys doing dumb shit”

All interesting questions or observations.

The removal of a powerful woman from the corporate structure of DC Comics opened the floodgates for a history of injustices done to women by DC Comics, significantly because of alleged and documented sexual harassment of women by Eddie Berganza, Group Editor.

So much has been said about the latter in the last week, much less handful of years, that I doubt I could add anything more.

What’s I’d like to discuss is this thing that happens, when I bring up DC Comics’ problems concerning its female employees in public and in private.

DC-Super-Hero-Girls-Diane-NelsonPeople throw out Diane Nelson’s name.

Throw it out like a baseball, or a panacea.

Diane Nelson is the President of DC Entertainment, a position she’s held since 2009.

DC Comics is a subsidiary of DC Entertainment.

DC Entertainment encompasses DC Comics.

The two are not the same. One is larger than the other. One commands the other.

None of the people whom have presented Diane Nelson’s name to me have offered proof that Diane Nelson runs the day-to-day operations of DC Comics.

I don’t think she does.

I think she has much bigger fish to fry and a considerably larger and higher-stakes palette of responsibilities than day-to-day management and oversight of the publishing arm.

Said arm being run by three men.

DC_EntertainmentSo DC Entertainment is like the parent of a child old enough to be afforded a good deal of autonomy, but still living in the corporate house.

Diane Nelson, a female President of DC Entertainment, does not seem to have any impact whatsoever as to how women are treated, on a corporate and, or human, level at DC Comics.

Women whom have served at DC Comics for at least two decades are given their walking papers, and other women have their creative job opportunities hampered by the continued employment of a controversial officer of the company.

So please spare us the Diane Nelson excuse. She’s a businesswoman of a higher order dealing with billion-dollar-scale matters.

She is not the parent in the equation. Apparently and unfortunately, DC Comics has no moral compass.

So we must serve that role.

The community of supporters and consumers, who believe that the providers of heroic mythology should operate within an environment of heroic ideals, who believe that the need for profit does not outweigh or negate the need for equity of treatment for everyone, who believe that good employees and creators should not have to deal with the conflict of working in the belly of a beast so they can make a living, raise their families, and provide stories that define a better world.

I have boycotted DC Comics before, but I will not do so now.

I know that heroes operate within their halls. People of bright spirits and the best of intentions write, draw, and utilize their artistic gifts to contribute to a mythology that has finally found global respect and greater impact along with its global visibility.

You and I, if we want a better comic book industry, can be the moral compass for this damaged company.

WONDER-WOMAN-SENSATION-04_612x380_0We can be their Superman, in our optimism and unwavering hope that they can be better, in our capacity to not punish creators for the actions of their employer.

We can be their Wonder Woman, in our considered judgment of their injustices and crimes against people across gender and ethnic lines.

We can be their Batman, in our capacity for decisive action which will be tantamount to punishment.

Our industry is diminished when men of power allow for crimes against women to continue, alongside the removal of women of power.

Let’s get them to do better, because honestly, when the publisher of Wonder Woman, arguably one of the most powerful icons associated with feminism and female empowerment for the last and present century, is the home to despicable actions against women, something is fundamentally wrong and ugly and sick.

The criticism and admonishment must continue.


Joseph Illidge Photo by Milo Stone

Joseph Illidge
Photo by Milo Stone

Joseph Phillip Illidge is a public speaker on the subjects of race, comics and the corporate politics of diversity. In addition to his coverage by The New York Times, CNN Money, the BBC and Publishers Weekly, Joseph has been a speaker at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Digital Book World’s forum, Digitize Your Career: Marketing and Editing 2.0, Skidmore College, The School of Visual Arts, Purdue University, on the panel “Diversity in Comics: Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Sexual Orientation in American Comic Books” and at the Soho Gallery for Digital Art in New York City.

Joseph is the Head Writer for Verge Entertainment. Verge has developed an extensive library of intellectual properties for live-action and animated television and film, video games, graphic novels and web-based entertainment.

His graphic novel project, “The Ren,” about the romance between a young musician from the South and a Harlem-born dancer in 1925, set against the backdrop of a crime war, will be published by First Second Books, a division of Macmillan.

Joseph’s newest comic book project is the upcoming Scout Comics miniseries “Solarman,” a revamp of a teenage superhero originally written by Stan Lee.

DC Comics Shakes Up Vertigo, Shelly Bond Let Go

vertigoYou go to sleep and wake up to a whole bunch of shit hitting the fan. DC Entertainment has announced it’ll be “restructuring” its imprint Vertigo. As part of that restructuring they have let go Shelly Bond, the Vice President & Executive Editor of the line of comics.

Bond began with DC Comics, and Vertigo, since 1993 which is when the imprint was formed. Previously she worked at Comico. She has worked on the imprint’s most celebrated works such as The Sandman, Sandman Mystery Theater, The Invisibles, Fables, and iZombie. In 2012 she became the Executive Editor for the line of comics after former head Karen Berger departed. She’s beloved in the industry with many specifically wanting to work with Vertigo to work with her.

The imprint was formed as a mature imprint for DC Comics.

However, the imprint has had issues in recent years with much of its prestige diminished and new series not exactly burning up the sales chart. Last year the line launched 12 new series, and while a few saw critical acclaim, they haven’t sold all that well. In fairness, a lot of comics aren’t selling all that well currently. In an age of an Image resurgence and a new golden age of indie comics, the line seemed to have trouble figuring out its role in this new landscape.

At Emerald City Comicon DC Comics announced a new imprint headed up by Gerard Way called Young Animal. The four series announced included Doom Patrol, Shade, The Changing Girl, Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye, and Mother Panic. That line-up seemed more of something you’d have seen at Vertigo, and it led many to ponder (including myself) why they weren’t being published under the Vertigo imprint, and I took it as the writing on the wall for the line.

The elimination of Bond’s position will have the team reporting to Jim Lee and Dan DiDio who head up the main DC Comics line-up, which itself is seeing its latest shake-up in a month with the “Rebirth” initiative.

DC Comics has released a full statement which you can read below:

STATEMENT RE VERTIGO RESTRUCTURING – April 2016

DC Entertainment is reexamining the direction and focus of the Vertigo imprint of comic books and graphic novels. The goal is to keep competitive and stay relevant in the changing marketplace, and to set the business up for future success.

The updated business structure will result for some employees in a change of reporting relationship, new job descriptions, and expanded roles and responsibilities.

Unfortunately, as part of the restructuring, the position of Vice President & Executive Editor has been eliminated. This was a very challenging process, and we made every effort to ensure all decisions were made with great care and consideration.

We are extremely grateful for Shelly Bond’s commitment and dedication to Vertigo, its books and its incredibly talented team of staff and creators.

In Vertigo she leaves a legacy to which we remain committed and on which we intend to build for the future. She will always be a deeply valued and respected member of the DC family.

We have the utmost confidence in the current editorial staff and look forward to the team leaving their mark on the Vertigo line knowing this new alignment creates a stronger organization that is well positioned for maximum potential.

Expect lots more as this story develops.

Review: She Makes Comics

she-makes-comicsAs a literary critic and cultural historian with both feminist and queer-ally persuasions, I am often frustrated by the type of historical revisionism that provides the history of a marginalized group by telling their story as adjunct or incidental to “mainstream” or “normative” history. Such scholarship marginalizes the narratives of oppressed groups in the very attempt to recover their histories.

I was thankfully relieved, then, to enjoy the hour-plus-long documentary She Makes Comics, directed by Marisa Stotter and made by Sequart Organization in association with Respect! Films. This documentary does what very little of comics scholarship (and journalism) has been able to achieve: it narrates the story of women comics creators, editors, and readers through dozens of personal interviews (see a list of interviewees below), incorporating them as central to the history of the comics industry while highlighting individual creators’ push toward greater inclusion and respectability in a medium largely controlled by men.

She Makes Comics begins with an opening montage of interviews in which creators Kelly Sue DeConnick, Chondra Echert, Wendy Pini, Gail Simone, and others speak to the importance of the comics medium for female creators and readers. Particularly powerful is DeConnick’s declaration that “representation in comics is absolutely vital,” followed by the injunction that “we need to celebrate the women who work in comics and who have always worked in comics, and we need to go back and find their stories and bring them to the fore” (00:55-01:07). DeConnick bring an absolute necessity to the project of reclaiming the history of women in comics.

DeConnick’s spirited call drives Stotter’s She Makes Comics as it traverses the editorial bull-pens, creator biographies, convention floors, retail spaces, and four-color universes that make up the world(s) of comics. The documentary begins by establishing the medium’s long history of female readership in comics strips of the late 19th century and the early 20th century, pointing at the same time to the generous number of female comics strip creators, including Jackie Ormes and Nell Brinkley. Trina Robbins reminds us that “nobody at that time thought, ‘Oh how unusual! She draws comics!'” Despite the comparative preponderance of women in comics in the early 20th century, a cultural moment that abounded in strong women heroes and adventurers (and with a 55% female readership!), the “comics crusade” of the early 1950s began by Frederic Wertham resulted in the Comics Code Authority. The CCA significantly reduced the type and quality of comics produced, and the documentary makes the very brief argument that the “sanitization” of comics led to a boom in the masculinity-celebrating superhero genre and a subsequent decline in female readership.

The documentary then tracks the work of Ramona Fradon at DC and of Marie Severin at Marvel in the 1960s, transitioning rather quickly to the misogynist, cliquey underground comix scene of the 1960s and 1970s, where creators such as Trina Robbins and Joyce Farmer carved out a feminist space for comics. As Robbins recalls, “if you wanted to do underground comix [with the male creators] you had to do comics in which women were raped and tortured. You know, horrible things!” But in the pages of feminist comix and zines creators were allowed the freedom to depict women from women’s point of view—points of view that occasionally had legal repercussions.

The remainder of She Makes Comics focuses heavily on the history of women creators in comics from the mid-1970s to the present, owing both to the interviewees’ considerable experiences in the period following the late 1970s and to the growing visibility of female readers and creators. Particular highlights include the description of early comic book conventions and the fan scene, which Paul Levitz describes as 90/10 men/women. Creators and fans like Jill Thompson and Wendy Pini bring their personal fan and creator experiences to bear on this unique moment in comics fandom history. Wendy Pini’s entrance into fandom via her (in)famous Red Sonja cosplaying is historicized and linked directly to her entrance into the comics industry as writer and, later, creator of Elfquest. For those with an interest in cosplay, Pini’s Sonja is marked as the beginning of an opening up of convention competitions to women, and the documentary subsequently details the critical importance of cosplay to fandom, to female fans, and to creators.

The documentary also gives considerable attention to Chris Claremont’s run on Uncanny X-Men, uniquely noting the considerable influence of Louise Simonson and Ann Nocenti as Claremont’s editors on one of the most famous runs in comic book history. Interviews by female fans, creators, editors, and retailers highlight the importance that Claremont’s X-Men saga had to marginalized groups, with a number of interviewees describing the “mutant metaphor” as particularizable to women’s experiences in geek culture.

The documentary also gives attention to particular auteurs such as Kelly Sue DeConnick and Gail Simone, as well as the editor Karen Berger, who founded DC’s Vertigo imprint at a fairly young age in the early 1990s. She Makes Comics points especially to the rise of the independent comics scene in the 1990s and its boom in the contemporary moment, especially in the form of Image’s new-found success, as a meter for the rising prominence of women comics creators and a female (but also queer and non-white) comics readership. Anyone who reads Image comics regularly knows that its creators do not shy away from feminist themes even while Wonder Women is avowedly “not feminist.”

She Makes Comics ultimately signifies that a change in the comics industry has occurred, albeit slowly, in favor of greater inclusion and representation of women and other oppressed minorities. Despite this, the documentary comes dangerously close to assuming that all the good that needs doing, has been done, asserting a stance that suggests a triumphant growth of women in comics (or as readers) as a victory over patriarchy. While I do agree that strides have been made, as my articles on Wonder Woman and Neko Case show, I don’t think we can ever be complacent. She Makes Comics reifies “women” as a singular, almost non-intersectional category and in doing so creates a narrative of emerging possibilities for that monolithic category without discussing the many and complex factors that continue to challenge, harangue, and complicate both women’s participation in comics and women’s representation. There is, in fairness, a brief moment in which Marjorie Liu speaks about using her position to empower women of color, though its importance is overshadowed by its anecdotal treatment.

She Makes Comics has very few shortcomings and is ultimately a treasure trove of information that is otherwise spread across thousands of online or print media articles, books, and interviews. Marissa Stotter and her crew, in collaborations with a riot (isn’t that what mainstream media calls a gathering of political dissenters?) of talented creators and fans, have made a unique contribution to the history of women in comics. I challenge academics and journalist, myself included, to heed Kelly Sue DeConnick’s introductory injunction with a critical eye to the politics of representation. If we could get a few books about gender politics in comics that aren’t solely about masculinity, that’d be a start.

Interviewees listed in the order that I happened to write them down (after I realized it would be good to write them all down): Marjorie Liu, Nancy GoldsteinTrina Robbins, Ramona Fradon, Janelle Asselin, Heidi MacDonald, Paul Levitz, Michelle Nolan, Alan Kistler, Karen Green, Ann Nocenti, Chris Claremont, Colleen Doran, Joyce Farmer, Wendy Pini, Jackie Estrada, Jill Thompson, Lauren Bergman, Team Unicorn, Chondra Echert, Jill Pantozzi, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Gail Simone, Colleen Coover, Holly Interlandi, Blair Butler, Louise Simonson, Jenna Busch, Amy Dallen, G. Willow Wilson, Tiffany Smith, Jenette Kahn, Shelly Bond, Karen Berger, Joan of Dark, Brea Grant, Joan Hilty, Lea Hernandez, Christina Blanch, Liz Schiller (former Friends of Lulu Board of Directors member), Andrea Tsurumi, Miss Lasko-Gross, Molly Ostertag, Hope Larson, Amy Chu, Nancy Collins, Ariel Schrag, Raina Telgemeier, Miriam Katin, Felicia Henderson, Carla Speed McNeil, Shannon Watters, Jennifer Cruté, Nicole Perlman, Kate Leth, Portlyn Polston (owner of Brave New World Comics), Autumn Glading (employee of Brave New World Comics), and Zoe Chevat.

You can purchase She Makes Comics on Sequart’s website for as low as $9.99. If you ask me, it’s a fantastic deal.

Sequart Organization provided Graphic Policy with a free copy for review.

DC Comics Announces Panel Schedule for San Diego Comic-Con

Official Press Release

DC Comics’ Road to San Diego: SDCC Panel Schedule
Attending San Diego Comic-Con this year? Don’t miss DC’s panels throughout the course of the convention. Check out the schedule below:

Thursday, July 21

10:30-11:30 DC: Talent Search
Moderators: Mark Chiarello/Jim Lee
Join DC’s Editorial Art Director, Mark Chiarello, for an informative orientation session that will explain how DC’s Talent Search works and discuss the different needs of the DC Comics, Vertigo and MAD Magazine. If you want to learn what DC Comics looks for in artists and how to improve your chances of becoming a working professional, then this is the panel for you! In order to have your work reviewed, attendance at this orientation session is mandatory. (Please note: Not all attendees are guaranteed a one-on-one review.) Room 12

11:30-12:30 DC: Flashpoint
Moderator: Bob Wayne EDITOR: Eddie Berganza
Everything you know will change in a Flash! Flashpoint, the blockbuster comics event of the summer, has turned the DC Universe inside out! Join DCU Executive Editor, Eddie Berganza, and some of the amazing talent behind Flashpoint, for a panel that’s sure to pose new questions about this explosive event even as it answers others! Room 6DE

1:00-2:00 DC Direct
Moderator: Bob Wayne EDITOR: Jim Fletcher
DC Direct has long been known as one of the most creative companies that produce collectibles for the direct market. Come and join DC Direct Director of Product Development Jim Fletcher and artist Adam Hughes, along with DC exclusive sculptors, and more, as they discuss their line of current projects, as well as the future plans revolving around the new DC Universe! Room 5AB

2:00-3:00 DC Comics – The New 52
Moderator: Eddie Berganza
The DC Universe explodes in September with 52 new number one issues and one panel is not enough to cover it! With a ‘DC Comics – The New 52’ panel each day, there’s sure to be something for everyone! Join Bob Harras, DC’s Editor-in-Chief, and DCU Executive Editor, Eddie Berganza, for an up-close look at this unprecedented wave of new series, from the first-ever re-launches of Action Comics and Batman titles to the latest thrills from comics’ cutting-edge! Join Bob, Eddie and some of the industry’s top writers and artists as we make history together. Room 6DE

3:15-4:15 DC: Batman
Moderator: John Cunningham EDITOR: Mike Marts
Batman, Robin, Nightwing, Batwoman and the rest of Gotham City’s greatest crimefighters take things to the next level in September with new battles and new titles! Now, get to know the writers and artists behind these exciting new comics, including Batman Group Editor Mike Marts, Grant Morrison (Batman Incorporated), David Finch (Batman: The Dark Knight), Scott Snyder (Detective Comics), Peter Tomasi (Batman & Robin) Patrick Gleason (Batman & Robin), Gail Simone (Batgirl), Judd Winick (Batwing, Catwoman) and others answer your questions at this exclusive Bat-panel! Room 6DE

5:45-6:45 Vertigo Editorial
Moderator: Karen Berger/John Cunningham
They come from the cutting edge of comics… and Vertigo has never been edgier, with thought-provoking titles from some of comics’ most acclaimed creators. Don’t miss this panel featuring Bill Willingham (Fables) Scott Snyder (American Vampire), Jeff Lemire (Sweet Tooth) Michael Allred (iZombie), Mark Buckingham (Fables), Les Klinger (Annotated Sandman), Rebecca Guay (A Flight of Angels), Colleen Doran (Gone to Amerikay), and many others – this is your opportunity to learn more about the entire Vertigo line! Hosted by Vertigo Executive Editor Karen Berger. Room 6DE

Friday, July 22

10:00-11:00 DC: Talent Search
Moderators: Mark Chiarello
Join DC’s Editorial Art Director, Mark Chiarello, for an informative orientation session that will explain how DC’s Talent Search works and discuss the different needs of the DC Comics, Vertigo and MAD Magazine. If you want to learn what DC Comics looks for in artists and how to improve your chances of becoming a working professional, then this is the panel for you! In order to have your work reviewed, attendance at this orientation session is mandatory. (Please note: Not all attendees are guaranteed a one-on-one review.) Room 12

10:00-11:00 DC: MAD Screening and Q&A
Moderator: John Ficarra
Often imitated but never duplicated, MAD is more than just the country’s best-selling humor magazine – it’s also the inspiration for the outrageous animated series from Warner Bros. Animation. Featuring short animated parodies, crazy commercials, pretend promos and classic gags inspired by the iconic magazine, MAD is currently one of the highest-rated series on Cartoon Network … and back at Comic-Con to share more laughs and explore the world of MAD. Join MAD Magazine editor John Ficarra, art director Sam Viviano and “Spy vs. Spy” artist Peter Kuper, along with MAD series producers Kevin Shinick and Mark Marek, for a sizzle reel of laughs from season one, a sneak peek at season two and a wise-cracking Q&A that’s bound to be, well, MAD. MAD airs Mondays at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on Cartoon Network. Room 25ABC

11:15-12:15 DC Comics – The New 52
Moderator: John Cunningham Editor: Bob Harras/Eddie Berganza
The DC Universe explodes in September with 52 new number one issues and one panel is not enough to cover it! With a ‘DC Comics – The New 52’ panel each day, there’s sure to be something for everyone! Join Bob Harras, DC’s Editor-in-Chief, and DCU Executive Editor, Eddie Berganza, for an up-close look at this unprecedented wave of new series, from the first-ever re-launches of Action Comics and Batman titles to the latest thrills from comics’ cutting-edge! Join Bob, Eddie and some of the industry’s top writers and artists as we make history together. Room 6DE

3:00-4:00 DC Superman
Moderator: John Cunningham Editor: Matt Idelson
How does The Man of Tomorrow fit into the new DC Universe that rises in September? Find out as Group Editor Matt Idelson joins new Action Comics writer Grant Morrison (All Star Superman, Batman Incorporated) and author of the best-selling Superman: Earth One graphic novel J. Michael Straczynski (Superman, Wonder Woman) to take fans new and old up, up and away to give readers a sneak peak at what’s in store for Superman. Room 6DE

4:15-5:15 DC: Justice League
Moderator: Bob Wayne Editor: Eddie Berganza
Comics’ top talents – writer Geoff Johns and artist Jim Lee – team up for the first time ever to bring you the new Justice League, making its debut as part of the new DC Universe! Join Johns, Lee and DC Executive Editor Eddie Berganza as they bring together the talents behind the new JLA titles, including writers Dan Jurgens (Justice League International), JT Krul (Green Arrow), Eric Wallace (Mister Terrific), artists Francis Manapul (The Flash), Brian Buccellato (The Flash), Philip Tan (The Savage Hawkman) and more! Room 6DE

5:30-6:30 Vertigo: American Vampire
Moderator: John Cunningham Editor: Mark Doyle
The acclaimed Vertigo series American Vampire – nominated for a 2010 Eisner Award as “Best New Series” – introduced Skinner Sweet and a whole new type of undead, blazing a blood-drenched new trail! Join the creator of this series, as well as the new miniseries American Vampire: Survival of the Fittest for an undead discussion with writer Scott Snyder, artist Rafael Albuquerque and Editor Mark Doyle. Room 6DE

Saturday, July 23

10:00-11:00 DC: Talent Search
Moderators: Mark Chiarello
Join DC’s Editorial Art Director, Mark Chiarello, for an informative orientation session that will explain how DC’s Talent Search works and discuss the different needs of the DC Comics, Vertigo and MAD Magazine. If you want to learn what DC Comics looks for in artists and how to improve your chances of becoming a working professional, then this is the panel for you! In order to have your work reviewed, attendance at this orientation session is mandatory. (Please note: Not all attendees are guaranteed a one-on-one review.) Room 12

10:00-11:00 DC: Green Lantern
Moderator: John Cunningham EDITOR: Eddie Berganza
Enlist in the Corps at DC’s annual Green Lantern panel! Join DCU Executive Editor Eddie Berganza, Green Lantern Corps writer Peter Tomasi, Red Lanterns artist Ed Benes and others for a look at the aftermath of “War of the Green Lanterns” and more! It’s one of the most exciting panels you’ll ever see! Room 6DE

11:15-12:30 DC Comics – The New 52
Moderator: Bob Wayne EDITOR: Bob Harras
The DC Universe explodes in September with 52 new number one issues and one panel is not enough to cover it! With a ‘DC Comics – The New 52’ panel each day, there’s sure to be something for everyone! Join Bob Harras, DC’s Editor-in-Chief, for an up-close look at this unprecedented wave of new series, from the first-ever re-launches of Action Comics and Batman titles to the latest thrills from comics’ cutting-edge! Join Bob and some of the industry’s top writers and artists as we make history together. Room 6DE

12:45-1:45 DC: The Dark and The Edge
Moderator: John Cunningham EDITOR: Pat McCallum
From the shadowy corners of the new DC Universe comes a startling array of new series featuring some of comics’ top creators! Join DC Editor Pat McCallum and get acquainted with new DC titles from “The Dark” and “The Edge,” including Swamp Thing, written by Scott Snyder, Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. and Animal Man, written by Jeff Lemire, Deathstroke, written by Kyle Higgins, Demon Knights and Stormwatch, written by Paul Cornell, I, Vampire written by Josh Fialkov, Suicide Squad written by Adam Glass, Swamp Thing, drawn by Francesco Francavilla, All Star Western by Jimmy Palmiotti, Justin Gray and Moritat, and more! Room 6DE

4:30-5:30 DC Focus: Jim Lee
Moderator: Bob Wayne EDITOR: Dan DiDio
Jim Lee is by far the most in-demand artist in comics, from his spectacular work on Batman, Superman, WildC.A.T.S. and so many other comics to his groundbreaking designs for the DC Universe MMO game. Now, as Co-Publisher of DC Comics, Jim has led the way to the start of the new DC Universe with his exciting new looks for the World’s Greatest Super Heroes. Join Jim and his fellow Co-Publisher, Dan DiDio, for a profile of the artist who’s setting the tone for the entire DCU! Room 6DE

7:00-8:00 Vertigo: Fables
Moderator: Shelly Bond/John Cunningham
The annual Fables panel has become a Comic-Con tradition – and with the original graphic novel Fables: Werewolves of the Heartland on the way this fall, there’s no better time to hear what Bill Willingham, creator of the multi-Eisner Award winning series, has to say. Join Bill, artists Mark Buckingham and Steve Leialoha, Group Editor Shelly Bond and others for a panel that is truly legendary. Room 6DE

Sunday, July 24

12:00-1:00 DC Focus: Jeff Lemire
Moderator: John Cunningham
Jeff Lemire
first made an impression on the world of comics with his award-winning Essex County graphic novel trilogy. He soon made the move to DC Comics, with the graphic novel The Nobody and comics including Superboy and the distopian epic Sweet Tooth. Lemire recently wrote the miniseries Flashpoint: Frankenstein and the Creatures of the Unknown, and will make a splash in September with the new, continuing series Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. and Animal Man. Join Jeff for a special chat about his work for DC Comics and Vertigo. Room 7AB

1:45-2:45 Designing the New DCU
Moderator: Bob Wayne EDITOR: Jim Lee
What does it take to remake a universe? There are new stories, new characters, and especially new designs! Join DC’s Co-Publisher Jim Lee, VP – Art and Design Mark Chiarello, exclusive artist Cully Hamner and others for a look as they discuss their visual approach to reshaping the DC Universe! Room 6DE

3:00-4:00 DC Comics – The New 52
Moderator: John Cunningham EDITOR: Mike Marts, Matt Idelson
The DC Universe explodes in September with 52 new number one issues and one panel is not enough to cover it! With a ‘DC Comics – The New 52’ panel each day, there’s sure to be something for everyone! Join DCU Group Editors Matt Idelson and Mike Marts for an up-close look at this unprecedented wave of new series, from the first-ever re-launches of Action Comics and Batman titles to the latest thrills from comics’ cutting-edge! Join Matt, Mike and some of the industry’s top writers and artists as we make history together. Room 6DE

4:00-5:00 Art Masters: Drawing DC
Moderator: Mark Chiarello
Superstar artists share their secrets of drawing the DC Universe with a special projector designed so you can see their every master stroke. Check out this unique presentation that will surely draw ‘oohs’ and ‘ahhs’ amongst the gathered masses! Room 30CDE

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