Tag Archives: san diego comic-con

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are you excited for? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Beat – DC’s new “eSports” publisher, Pam Lifford’s plans and more fallout from Bloodbath Monday – If you want one of the better takes on the changes at DC.

Book Riot – Our Favorite San Diego Comic-Con Panels to Watch at Home – Which panels did you enjoy?

Reviews

CBR – Canto II: Hollow Men
Comics Bulletin – Strange Skies Over East Berlin

Strange Skies Over East Berlin

Those Two Geeks Episode Seventy Six: Comic-Con at Home – Yay or Nay?

Join Alex and Joe as they talk about Comic-Con at home and Tom King’s tweets regarding Jae Lee and a certain internet hate group. It’s important to note that given then time between recording and publication, Tom King has addressed the tweets and the actions he took.

As always, Alex and Joe can be found on twitter respectively @karcossa and @jcb_smark if you feel the need to tell them they’re wrong individually, or @those2geeks if you want to yell at them together on twitter, or by email at ItsThose2Geeks@gmail.com.

Around the Tubes

It was a pretty quiet Wednesday when it came to comic news (seriously where are all of the reviews!?). But, here’s an interesting article and a review you might have missed courtesy of our morning roundup!

Book Riot – I Watched the SDCC Small Press Panel and Now I am 86% Rage Bees – These were all pre-taped videos. There’s no excuse for this at all. There was also a CG member on a panel as well…

Review

The Beat – Giant-Size X-Men Fantomex #1

Giant-Size X-Men Fantomex #1

SDCC 2020: Todd McFarlane Reveals a New Creature Line RAW10

McFarlane Toys has announced a new McFarlane designed creature toy line RAW10 coming exclusively to Walmart.  McFarlane and the award-winning McFarlane Toys’ design team have created a brand-new toy line and online comic series for creature and monster fans of all ages.

In the near future, the worlds of Super-Science and Primal Savagery have merged. Hidden away from prying eyes, the secret laboratories of RAW10 have created powerful warriors: part beast, part machine! But some have rebelled against their creator and have chosen to fight on the side of Humanity! Who will prove to be the strongest!

The first line of RAW10 toys features McFarlane’s classic and fan-favorite comic gorilla CY-GOR, and brand-new McFarlane designed monsters and creatures.  McFarlane Toys RAW10 creature toy line is available exclusively at Walmart. The line is available for pre-order now at Walmart.com and coming to store shelves on August 1.

CODENAME: CY-GOR
SPECIES: Silverback Gorilla
ATTACKS: Power Slam, Monkey Punch, Rage Attack

The CY-GOR large set features moveable arms, legs, and head and comes with a FREE CY-GOR mini-comic poster. MSRP $19.99

CY-GOR is the pinnacle of the Robotic Animal Weapon (RAW) labs’ science. He is the perfect combination of beast and machine. Designed as a test subject for RAW’s newest cybernetic enhancements, CY-GOR exceeded his potential to become RAW’s greatest success. His brute strength is augmented with metallic muscles, and his intellect, instincts, and reflexes are perfectly tuned with his built-in combat matrix. He was created to be a next-gen warrior. Now, the perfect weapon is on the loose and out of control.

CODENAME: FREN-Z
SPECIES: Great White Shark
ATTACKS: Power Jaws, Frenzy Strike, Fin Attack

The FREN -Z large set has an articulated tail and moveable jaw and comes with a FREE FREN-Z mini-comic poster.  MSRP $9.99

FREN-Z is the king of the ocean—every ocean. He is a mix of robotics and the DNA of a Great White Shark combined with the prehistoric Megalodon Super Shark for extra terror. FREN-Z was created to be the prototype for a new breed of aquatic weaponry. But the dangerous minds at the Robotic Animal Warrior (RAW) labs did their job too well, and FREN-Z escaped. Now he stalks the oceans, an unstoppable hunter—part-shark, part-machine, all-deadly.

CODENAME: RAPTAR
SPECIES: Velociraptor Dinosaur
ATTACKS: Claw Strike, Tail Whip, Power Bite

The RAPTAR features movable arms, legs, and head and comes with a FREE RAPTAR mini-poster. MSRP $9.99.

RAPTAR, and his wicked velociraptor brothers, were created in the top-secret Robotic Animal Warrior (RAW) labs. Combining ancient dinosaur DNA with advanced cybernetic machinery, the mad scientists in charge of RAW labs wanted to create the ultimate hunting party. The result was a trio of vicious beasts led by RAPTAR. Using linked intelligence coding, the brothers hunt as one, taking their commands from RAPTAR, and can track any target over any terrain. Alone they are dangerous. Together, they are unstoppable.

CODENAME: BATTLESNAKE
SPECIES: King Cobra / Rattlesnake hybrid
ATTACKS: Coil Strike, Fang Strike, Hypno Gaze

The BATTLESNAKE small set comes with a flexible tale, moveable jaw, and articulated slide-out tongue and a FREE BATTLESNAKE mini-comic poster. MSRP $9.99

BATTLESNAKE is the product of mad science. Fusing reptile DNA with radical cyber-technology and self-powered Ion Core Energy systems, the engineers in the top-secret Robotic Animal Warrior (RAW) labs created a real monster. Possessing genius-level intelligence and futuristic combat programming, BATTLESNAKE can hypnotize his prey before striking with his piercing “techno fangs.” His super-steel underbelly and reinforced hood protect him from attacks, and his sinister mind makes him a threat to all living things.

SDCC 2020: Hero Collector announces brand new ships from The Orville

Hero Collector have announced that their line of collectible starships from The Orville are now available to pre-order!

These die-cast miniatures perfectly capture the ships of the show in exacting detail, each accompanied by a magazine filled with concept art, interviews, and behind-the-scenes details for Seth MacFarlane’s live-action, science fiction TV hit.

First announced during The Orville panel at last year’s San-Diego Comic Con, these high-quality collectible starships measure approximately 5 inches in length, with a special XL version of the USS Orville that comes in at over 10 inches.

  • USS Orville (ECV-197), the eponymous vessel of The Orville! This Exploratory-class vessel was designed for long voyages into uncharted space, carrying nearly 300 crew members and their families.
  • Union Shuttle (ECV-197-1), the sleek shuttlecraft used by the USS Orville’s crew to ferry themselves to other ships and the surfaces of alien planets.

Of course, The Orville is packed with numerous spacefarers from outside of the Planetary Union – from the militarized Moclans to the synthetic Kaylon or fanatical Krill – and after the overwhelming response to this first wave, Hero Collector can confirm that more ships will be joining The Orville Starship Collection in 2021!

SDCC 2020: V. E. Schwab Reveals New Comics Set in the Villains Universe

Extraordinary

Titan Comics and V. E. Schwab have announced Extraordinary – a new comics series set in the world of the internationally-acclaimed fantasy novels Vicious and Vengeful – and slated for release in 2021. The news was revealed the news during the Shades of Magic panel at San Diego Comic-Con on Sunday, July 26.

The new comic series is set in the Villains novel universe during the five years between Schwab’s critically acclaimed Vicious (2013) and the sequel novel Vengeful (2018), and  follows Eli “Ever” Cardale, as he takes on a sinister new role hunting down Extraordinaries, or E.O.s, as they grapple with their newfound powers.

Extraordinary continues the collaboration between Titan Comics and author V. E. Schwab, which began with the Shades of Magic: The Steel Prince graphic novel trilogy. Reaching the final round of the GoodReads Choice Awards 2019, the trilogy – The Steel Prince (2019), The Night of Knives (2019) and The Rebel Army (July 2020) – is a prequel to her phenomenally popular novel series Shades of Magic and features art by Andrea Olimipieri, Budi Setiawan and Enrica Eren Angiolini.

The Shades of Magic panel is available to watch in full on the San Diego Comic Con YouTube Channel now or below.

SDCC 2020: The 2020 Will Eisner Comic Industry Award Winners Announced

During a pre-recorded ceremony as part of Comic-Con@Home, the winners of the 2020 Will Eisner Awards were announced.

The ceremony was hosted by Phil Lamarr and was a streamlined ceremony. This year’s Eisner Hall of Fame inductees, as announced by cartoonist Sergio Aragones, include judges’ choices Nell Brinkley and E. Simms Campbell, plus voter choices Alison Bechdel, Howard Cruse, Stan Sakai, Louise Simonson, Don & Maggie Thompson, and Bill Watterson.

Ruth Clampett, daughter of animator Bob Clampett, announced the winners for this year’s Bob Clampett Humanitarian Awards which included The Hero Initiative, creators4comics, and the Comic Book United Fund. All of whom provided relief to comic creators and retailers impacted by COVID-19.

Check out the full list of winners, denoted in bold, below.


Best Short Story

Best Single Issue/One-Shot
  • WINNER: Our Favorite Thing Is My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, by Emil Ferris (Fantagraphics)
  • Coin-Op No. 8: Infatuation, by Peter and Maria Hoey (Coin-Op Books)
  • The Freak, by Matt Lesniewski (AdHouse)
  • Minotäar, by Lissa Treiman (Shortbox)
  • Sobek, by James Stokoe (Shortbox)

Best Continuing Series
  • WINNER: Bitter Root, by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene (Image)
  • Criminal, by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)
  • Crowded, by Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt (Image)
  • Daredevil, by Chip Zdarsky and Marco Checchetto (Marvel)
  • The Dreaming, by Simon Spurrier, Bilquis Evely et al. (DC)
  • Immortal Hulk, by Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, and Ruy José et al. (Marvel)

Best Limited Series
  • WINNER: Little Bird by Darcy Van Poelgeest and Ian Bertram (Image)
  • Ascender, by Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen (Image)
  • Ghost Tree, by Bobby Curnow and Simon Gane (IDW)
  • Naomi by Brian Michael Bendis, David Walker, and Jamal Campbell (DC)
  • Sentient, by Jeff Lemire and Gabriel Walta (TKO)

Best New Series
  • WINNER: Invisible Kingdom, by G. Willow Wilson and Christian Ward (Berger Books/Dark Horse)
  • Doctor Doom, by Christopher Cantwell and Salvador Larocca (Marvel)
  • Once & Future, by Kieron Gillen and Dan Mora (BOOM! Studios)
  • Something Is Killing the Children, by James Tynion IV and Werther Dell’Edera (BOOM! Studios)
  • Undiscovered Country, by Scott Snyder, Charles Soule, Giuseppe Camuncoli, and Daniele Orlandini (Image)

Best Publication for Early Readers
  • WINNER: Comics: Easy as ABC, by Ivan Brunetti (TOON)
  • Kitten Construction Company: A Bridge Too Fur, by John Patrick Green (First Second/Macmillan)
  • The Pigeon HAS to Go to School! by Mo Willems (Hyperion Books)
  • A Trip to the Top of the Volcano with Mouse, by Frank Viva (TOON)
  • ¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market, by Raúl the Third (Versify/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
  • Who Wet My Pants? by Bob Shea and Zachariah Ohora (Little, Brown)

Best Publication for Kids
  • WINNER: Guts, by Raina Telgemeier (Scholastic Graphix)
  • Akissi: More Tales of Mischief, by Marguerite Abouet and Mathieu Sapin (Flying Eye/Nobrow)
  • Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls, by Dav Pilkey (Scholastic Graphix)
  • New Kid, by Jerry Craft (Quill Tree/HarperCollins)
  • This Was Our Pact, by Ryan Andrews (First Second/Macmillan)
  • The Wolf in Underpants, by Wilfrid Lupano, Mayana Itoïz, and Paul Cauuet (Graphic Universe/Lerner Publishing Group)

Best Publication for Teens
  • WINNER: Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me, by Mariko Tamaki and Rosemary Valero-O’Connell (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass, by Mariko Tamaki and Steve Pugh (DC)
  • Hot Comb, by Ebony Flowers (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Kiss Number 8, by Colleen AF Venable and Ellen T. Crenshaw (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Penny Nichols, by MK Reed, Greg Means, and Matt Wiegle (Top Shelf)

Best Humor Publication
  • WINNER: The Way of the Househusband, vol. 1, by Kousuke Oono, translation by Sheldon Drzka (VIZ Media)
  • Anatomy of Authors, by Dave Kellett (SheldonComics.com)
  • Death Wins a Goldfish, by Brian Rea (Chronicle Books)
  • Minotäar, by Lissa Treiman (Shortbox)
  • Sobek, by James Stokoe (Shortbox)
  • Wondermark: Friends You Can Ride On, by David Malki (Wondermark)

Best Anthology
  • WINNER: Drawing Power: Women’s Stories of Sexual Violence, Harassment, and Survival, edited by Diane Noomin (Abrams)
  • ABC of Typography, by David Rault (SelfMade Hero)
  • Baltic Comics Anthology š! #34-37, edited by David Schilter, Sanita Muižniece et al. (kuš!)
  • Kramer’s Ergot #10, edited by Sammy Harkham (Fantagraphics)
  • The Nib #2–4, edited by Matt Bors (Nib)

Best Reality-Based Work
  • WINNER: They Called Us Enemy, by George Takei, Justin Eisinger, Steven Scott, and Harmony Becker (Top Shelf)
  • Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations, by Mira Jacob (One World/Random House)
  • Grass, by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translation by Janet Hong (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Kid Gloves: Nine Months of Careful Chaos, by Lucy Knisley (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Moonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of Spaceflight, by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm (Hill & Wang)
  • My Solo Exchange Diary, vol. 2(sequel to My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness), by Nagata Kabi, translation by Jocelyne Allen (Seven Seas)

Best Graphic Album—New
  • WINNER: Are You Listening? by Tillie Walden (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Bezimena, by Nina Bunjevac (Fantagraphics)
  • BTTM FDRS, by Ezra Claytan Daniels and Ben Passmore (Fantagraphics)
  • Life on the Moon, by Robert Grossman (Yoe Books/IDW)
  • New World, by David Jesus Vignolli (Archaia/BOOM!)
  • Reincarnation Stories, by Kim Deitch (Fantagraphics)

Best Graphic Album—Reprint
  • WINNER: LaGuardia, by Nnedi Okorafor and Tana Ford (Berger Books/Dark Horse)
  • Bad Weekend by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips (Image)
  • Clyde Fans, by Seth (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Cover, vol. 1, by Brian Michael Bendis and David Mack (DC/Jinxworld)
  • Glenn Ganges: The River at Night, by Kevin Huizenga (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Rusty Brown, by Chris Ware (Pantheon)

Best Adaptation from Another Medium
  • WINNER: Snow, Glass, Apples, by Neil Gaiman and Colleen Doran (Dark Horse Books)
  • Giraffes on Horseback Salad: Salvador Dali, the Marx Brothers, and the Strangest Movie Never Made, by Josh Frank, Tim Hedecker, and Manuela Pertega (Quirk Books)
  • The Giver, by Lois Lowry and P. Craig Russell, (HMH Books for Young Readers)
  • The Handmaid’s Tale: The Graphic Novel, by Margaret Atwood, adapted by Renee Nault (Nan A. Talese)
  • HP Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness, vols. 1–2adapted by Gou Tanabe, translation by Zack Davisson (Dark Horse Manga)
  • The Seventh Voyage, by Stanislaw Lem, adapted by Jon Muth, translation by Michael Kandel (Scholastic Graphix)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material
  • WINNER: The House, by Paco Roca, translation by Andrea Rosenberg (Fantagraphics)
  • Diabolical Summer, by Thierry Smolderen and Alexandre Clerisse, translation by Edward Gauvin (IDW)
  • Gramercy Park, by Timothée de Fombelle and Christian Cailleaux, translation by Edward Gauvin (EuroComics/IDW)
  • Maggy Garrisson, by Lewis Trondheim and Stéphane Oiry, translation byEmma Wilson (SelfMadeHero)
  • Stay, by Lewis Trondheim and Hubert Chevillard, translation by Mike Kennedy (Magnetic Press)
  • Wrath of Fantômas, by Olivier Bouquet and Julie Rocheleau, translation by Edward Gauvin (Titan)

Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia
  • WINNER – TIE: Cats of the Louvre, by Taiyo Matsumoto, translation by Michael Arias (VIZ Media)
  • WINNER – TIE: Witch Hat Atelier, by Kamome Shirahama, translation by Stephen Kohler (Kodansha)
  • BEASTARS, by Paru Itagaki, translation by Tomo Kimura(VIZ Media)
  • Grass, by Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, translation by Janet Hong (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Magic Knight Rayearth 25th Anniversary Edition, by CLAMP, translation by Melissa Tanaka (Kodansha)
  • The Poe Clan, by Moto Hagio, translation by Rachel Thorn (Fantagraphics)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Strips
  • WINNER: Krazy Kat: The Complete Color Sundays, by George Herriman, edited by Alexander Braun (TASCHEN)
  • Cham: The Best Comic Strips and Graphic Novelettes, 1839–1862, by David Kunzle (University Press of Mississippi)
  • Ed Leffingwell’s Little Joe, by Harold Gray, edited by Peter Maresca and Sammy Harkham (Sunday Press Books)
  • The George Herriman Library: Krazy & Ignatz 1916–1918, edited by R.J. Casey(Fantagraphics)
  • Madness in Crowds: The Teeming Mind of Harrison Cady, by Violet and Denis Kitchen (Beehive Books)
  • PogoVol. 6: Clean as a Weasel, by Walt Kelly, edited by Mark Evanier and Eric Reynolds (Fantagraphics)

Best Archival Collection/Project—Comic Books
  • WINNER: Stan Sakai’s Usagi Yojimbo: The Complete Grasscutter Artist Select, by Stan Sakai, edited by Scott Dunbier (IDW)
  • Alay-Oop,by William Gropper (New York Review Comics)
  • The Complete Crepax, vol. 5: American Stories, edited by Kristy Valenti(Fantagraphics)
  • Jack Kirby’s Dingbat Love, edited by John Morrow (TwoMorrows)
  • Moonshadow: The Definitive Edition, by J. M. DeMatteis, Jon J Muth, George Pratt, Kent Williams, and others (Dark Horse Books)
  • That Miyoko Asagaya Feeling, by Shinichi Abe, translation by Ryan Holmberg, edited by Mitsuhiro Asakawa (Black Hook Press)

Best Writer
  • WINNER: Mariko Tamaki, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (DC); Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me (First Second/Macmillan); Archie (Archie)
  • Bobby Curnow, Ghost Tree (IDW)
  • MK Reed and Greg Means, Penny Nichols (Top Shelf)
  • Lewis Trondheim, Stay (Magnetic Press); MaggyGarrisson (SelfMadeHero)
  • G. Willow Wilson, Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse); Ms. Marvel (Marvel)
  • Chip Zdarsky, White Trees (Image); Daredevil, Spider-Man: Life Story (Marvel); Afterlift (comiXology Originals)

Best Writer/Artist
  • WINNER: Raina Telgemeier, Guts (Scholastic Graphix)
  • Nina Bunjevac, Bezimena (Fantagraphics)
  • Mira Jacob, Good Talk (Random House); “The Menopause” in The Believer (June 1, 2019)
  • Keum Suk Gendry-Kim, Grass (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • James Stokoe, Sobek (Shortbox)
  • Tillie Walden, Are You Listening? (First Second/Macmillan)

Best Penciller/Inker or Penciller/Inker Team
  • WINNER: Rosemary Valero-O’Connell, Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me (First Second/Macmillan)
  • Ian Bertram, Little Bird (Image)
  • Colleen Doran, Snow, Glass, Apples (Dark Horse)
  • Bilquis Evely, The Dreaming (DC)
  • Simon Gane, Ghost Tree (IDW)
  • Steve Pugh, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass (DC)

Best Painter/Digital Artist
  • WINNER: Christian Ward, Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse)
  • Didier Cassegrain, Black Water Lilies (Europe Comics)
  • Alexandre Clarisse, Diabolical Summer (IDW)
  • David Mack, Cover (DC)
  • Léa Mazé, Elma, A Bear’s Life, vol. 1: The Great Journey (Europe Comics)
  • Julie Rocheleau, Wrath of Fantômas (Titan)

Best Cover Artist
  • WINNER: Emma Rios, Pretty Deadly (Image)
  • Jen Bartel, Blackbird  (Image Comics)
  • Francesco Francavilla, Archie, Archie 1955, Archie Vs. Predator II, Cosmo (Archie)
  • David Mack, American Gods, Fight Club 3 (Dark Horse); Cover (DC)
  • Julian Totino Tedesco, Daredevil (Marvel)
  • Christian Ward, Machine Gun Wizards (Dark Horse), Invisible Kingdom (Berger Books/Dark Horse)

Best Coloring
  • WINNER: Dave Stewart, Black Hammer,B.P.R.D.: The Devil You Know, Hellboy and the BPRD(Dark Horse); Gideon Falls (Image); Silver Surfer Black, Spider-Man (Marvel)
  • Lorena Alvarez, Hicotea (Nobrow)
  • Jean-Francois Beaulieu, Middlewest, Outpost Zero (Image)
  • Matt Hollingsworth, Batman: Curse of the White Knight, Batman White Knight Presents Von Freeze (DC); Little Bird, November (Image)
  • Molly Mendoza, Skip (Nobrow)

Best Lettering
  • WINNER: Stan Sakai, Usagi Yojimbo (IDW)
  • Deron Bennett, Batgirl, Green Arrow, Justice League, Martian Manhunter (DC); Canto (IDW); Assassin Nation, Excellence (Skybound/Image); To Drink and To Eat, vol. 1 (Lion Forge); Resonant (Vault)
  • Jim Campbell, Black BadgeCoda (BOOM Studios); Giant DaysLumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship (BOOM Box!); Rocko’s Modern Afterlife (KaBOOM!); At the End of Your Tether (Lion Forge); Blade Runner 2019 (Titan); Mall, The Plot, Wasted Space (Vault)
  • Clayton Cowles, Aquaman, Batman, Batman and the Outsiders, Heroes in Crisis, Superman: Up in the Sky, Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen (DC);Bitter Root, Pretty Deadly, Moonstruck, Redlands, The Wicked + The Divine (Image); Reaver  (Skybound/Image); Daredevil, Ghost-Spider, Silver Surfer Black, Superior Spider-Man, Venom (Marvel)
  • Emilie Plateau, Colored: The Unsung Life of Claudette Colvin (Europe Comics)
  • Tillie Walden, Are You Listening? (First Second/Macmillan)

Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism
  • WINNER: Women Write About Comics, edited by Nola Pfau and Wendy Browne, www.WomenWriteAboutComics.com
  • Comic Riffs blog, by Michael Cavna, www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/comics/
  • The Comics Journal, edited by Gary Groth, RJ Casey, and Kristy Valenti(Fantagraphics)
  • Hogan’s Alley, edited by Tom Heintjes (Hogan’s Alley)
  • Inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society, edited by Qiana Whitted(Ohio State University Press)
  • LAAB Magazine, vol. 4: This Was Your Life, edited by Ronald Wimberly and Josh O’Neill (Beehive Books)

Best Comics-Related Book
  • WINNER: Making Comics, by Lynda Barry (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • The Art of Nothing: 25 Years of Mutts and the Art of Patrick McDonnell(Abrams)
  • The Book of Weirdo, by Jon B. Cooke (Last Gasp)
  • Grunt: The Art and Unpublished Comics of James Stokoe (Dark Horse)
  • Logo a Gogo: Branding Pop Culture, by Rian Hughes (Korero Press)
  • Screwball! The Cartoonists Who Made the Funnies Funny, by Paul Tumey (Library of American Comics/IDW)

Best Academic/Scholarly Work
  • WINNER: EC Comics: Race, Shock, and Social Protest, by Qiana Whitted (Rutgers University Press)
  • The Art of Pere Joan: Space, Landscape, and Comics Form, by Benjamin Fraser (University of Texas Press)
  • The Comics of Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets, by Kevin Haworth (University Press of Mississippi)
  • The Peanuts Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life, edited by Andrew Blauner (Library of America)
  • Producing Mass Entertainment: The Serial Life of the Yellow Kid, by Christina Meyer (Ohio State University Press)
  • Women’s Manga in Asia and Beyond: Uniting Different Cultures and Identities, edited by Fusami Ogi et al. (Palgrave Macmillan)

Best Publication Design
  • WINNER: Making Comics, designed by Lynda Barry (Drawn & Quarterly)
  • Grunt: The Art and Unpublished Comics of James Stokoe, designed by Ethan Kimberling (Dark Horse)
  • Krazy Kat: The Complete Color Sundays, by George Herriman, designed by Anna-Tina Kessler (TASCHEN)
  • Logo a Gogo, designed by Rian Hughes (Korero Press)
  • Madness in Crowds: The Teeming Mind of Harrison Cady, designed by Paul Kopple and Alex Bruce (Beehive Books)
  • Rusty Brown, designed by Chris Ware (Pantheon)

Best Digital Comic
  • WINNER: Afterlift, by Chip Zdarsky and Jason Loo (comiXology Originals)
  • Black Water Lilies, by Michel Bussi, adapted by Frédéric Duval and Didier Cassegrain, translated by Edward Gauvin (Europe Comics)
  • Colored: The Unsung Life of Claudette Colvin, by Tania de Montaigne, adapted by Emilie Plateau, translated by Montana Kane (Europe Comics)
  • Elma, A Bear’s Life, vol. 1: The Great Journey, by Ingrid Chabbert and Léa Mazé, translated by Jenny Aufiery (Europe Comics)
  • Mare Internum, by Der-shing Helmer (comiXology; gumroad.com/l/MIPDF)
  • Tales from Behind the Window, by Edanur Kuntman, translated by Cem Ulgen (Europe Comics)

Best Webcomic

SDCC 2020: Constantine and the Fantastic Four come to Mezco’s One:12 Collective

During their Saturday reveals, Mezco Toyz has shown off the upcoming Constantine figure as part of their One:12 Collective line.

Also revealed, the Fantastic Four! Yes, Marvel‘s first family is also getting the One:12 Collective treatmet. No figures have been shown but this is a set of figures that have been requested for some time. Can Doctor Doom be far behind?

SDCC 2020: Comics as a Conduit panel, an essential watch

San Diego Comic Con 2020 has been forced down the road of remote programming due to current COVID-19 concerns, but it’s taken the opportunity to present some high quality, highly important pre-recorded panel discussions that people can access whenever they want after they’ve been made available via the SDCC at Home schedule website. One such panel took place on opening day (Wednesday, July 22 ,2020), called Comics as a Conduit, and it immediately set a high bar with an urgent tone and an infectious sense of excitement when it comes to dealing with History as a current and present problem that comics can and should address.

Moderated by Chloe Ramos, Comics as a Conduit centered on the specific uses and intentions of real world developments in comics to inform and engage with the problems currently on display in our streets today. Henry Barajas (author of La Voz de M.A.Y.O.: Tata Rambo), Rodney Barnes (author of Killadelphia), Darcy Van Poelgeest (author of Little Bird: The Fight for Elder’s Hope), and David F. Walker (author of Bitter Root) participated in the panel as their comics are, essentially, great examples of the very conduits under question.

I’ll go through some of the highlights as the panel is up on YouTube in its entirety for anyone interested. I truly recommend taking the time to see it to get everything straight from the source. It was a powerful panel and a great conversation.

Chloe Ramos had an impressive set of incisive questions that didn’t settle for simple answers. In general, they homed in on the expectations that come with incorporating history into a comic and what type of reactions or expectations creators aim for when presenting their extensively researched stories to the public.

Barnes spoke to the necessity of making racism a more complicated type of discussion in media as a whole to really get to explore the actual ramifications of it. His Philadelphia vampire comic, Killadelphia, approaches this idea through the politics of poverty and how it shows apathy and displacement to be a product of a racist history. With such a dense point of view, Barnes also mentioned the importance of making history “not seem like medicine” in comics, so that everyone can get into it.

Van Poelgeest, creator of Little Bird, went a similar route. He emphasized the importance of making books that don’t keep readers out of the loop and, thus, unable to engage with these type of stories. Poelgeest said that accessibility keeps readership diverse and that the opposite “keeps a lot of people out of the world of reading.” This is perhaps one of the most important things mentioned in the panel and it really hits home when considering how certain works of non-fiction stay within the realm of academia without setting up different avenues for dialogue with the world outside of it.

Barajas’ interventions also expanded on this point as his book is a work of comics journalism whose intention is to shed light on a history that doesn’t make it into popular history books. The story of Tata Rambo deals with generational trauma and how it led to a movement that fought for better working and living conditions for the Pascua Yaqi Tribe in Toucson, Arizona. One of the things Barajas added to the conversation considered the inclusion of supplemental material in these type of books. Getting people in touch with actual documents and news clippings can only further the learning process, something La Voz de M.A.Y.O. does very well.

For Walker, a self-proclaimed research junkie (which wonderfully shows in his writing), looking at the Harlem Renaissance for his monster hunting book Bitter Root was an exercise in looking beyond the romantic version of history and into the aberrant racism of early 20th century America. The concept of entertainment as a conduit came to him when he watched George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead and saw how a movie about zombies could say so much about race relations and war. He also mentioned that there’s an interesting discussion to be had with horror in terms of responsibility and who’s supposed to fight the monsters. This is a running theme in the genre, across all mediums, and one that Bitter Root explores well. If you haven’t read it yet, now’s a good time to do so.

Again, these blurbs are meant to offer a taste of the panel rather than a summary of it. I whole-heartedly recommend giving it a watch as it says a lot about how we as readers learn through comics and how we can be doing more of it.

For the full Comics as a Conduit panel, click here.

SDCC 2020: Fear the Walking Dead Season 6 Premieres October 6

During AMC‘s Walking Dead panel for Comic-Con@Home, the network revealed the sixth season of Fear the Walking Dead will premiere Sunday, October 11 at 9 pm. The show also got its first trailer for the season that you can watch below.

It was also revealed that cast member Lennie James will be making his directorial debut in season six, joining fellow cast member Colman Domingo, who will be directing his third episode this season.

Domingo also announced his digital series on Youtube.com/TheWalkingDead and AMC.com, Bottomless Brunch at Colman’s, has been picked up for an additional six episodes. The 20-minute video-chat-based show, hosted by Domingo from his home in Los Angeles, taps into his favorite way to stay connected to his community of family and friends – brunch – and takes it virtual. The series returns Sunday, August 23.

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