Tag Archives: red hood

DC Rebirth Recap And Review For Comics Released 8/30

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

BM_Cv30_open_order_varBatman #30 Another interlude issue in the War Of Jokes And Riddles arc that has been pitting Joker against the Riddler. Last issue had Bruce Wayne hosting the two at a dinner party to ostensibly  try and make them see sense in some way, but the twist ending is that he was deciding which side Batman would join. With the first interlude we were treated to a phenomenal character study for Kite Man, so I went in expecting two things; that this would be a great read and a Friendly  comic. I was not disappointed. This is utterly phenomenal. 9/10

Cyborg #16 The aftermath of an intensely long and involved story is here, and because I haven’t  really been keeping up with the series I’m a little lost here. I think Cyborg’s in an alternate reality where he’s facing off against an evil version of himself. As this is the aftermath of the current arc (although it really doesn’t feel that way) the issue isn’t all that friendly. But it’s pretty good. 7/10

Deathstroke #23 Deathstroke is trying to become a hero, of sorts, and has formed a team, Defiance, that he’s training. I’ve missed a few of the last couple issues (at least one) and so I’m not really too clear on the rest of the details, but this issue is Friendly enough once you know about Slade’s change of heart. 7/10

Green Arrow #30 So this issue is the fifth part in the current story arc, and it’s actually GA_Cv30_dspretty Friendly. What won’t make sense to you? Ollie Queen has been framed for murder, but he’s skipped town. Black Canary and Red Arrow are trying to find the woman Ollie was accused of killing who may or may not have been kidnapped by human traffickers. Basically that’ll be all you need to enjoy this wonderfully illustrated issue. 8.5/10

Green Lanterns #30 Alright so Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz have been sent ten billion years in the past by Volthoom, the First Lantern, who really just wants to go home. Whilst there they came across the first seven Green Lanterns, only to find out they needed to train and introduce them to the Oath before heading off to fight a literal planet killing threat: a much younger Volthoom. Oh, and Simon’s ring exploded before they arrived in the past. 8/10

Harley Quinn #27 Full disclosure: I am far from a fan of Harley Quinn as  solo star. That said, this is a Friendly standalone story featuring the former psychologist. While it wasn’t really my cup of tea, you may enjoy it. 6.5/10

Justice League #28 The Justice League’s children have come from the future to stop something cataclysmic from happening, and Future Aquaman (who wears Cyborg’s body as armour) has followed them back to the present – probably to kill them. Last issue he beat the hell out of Batman… If you’re into time travel style stories then there’s a lot here to like. This isn’t the most accessible comic (it’s barely Friendly) but if you grab last issue you’ll be fine. 8/10

Nightwing #28 The finale to the current arc is fairly Friendly courtesy of Nightwing’s recap at the beginning of the issue. Honestly, though, while you can certainly jump on board here I’d almost recommend waiting to the next issue so you can start with the first part of an arc. 7/10

Superman #30 Last issue Superman got possessed by the Fear entity Parallax (think the god of fear that is the source of power for the Yellow Lanterns. Kind of. Not really. But Parallax is evil) while trying to save a bunch of children that the monster ha begun controlling. Now, Sinestro is back to capture Parallax… so oddly we’re rooting for the longtime Green Lantern villain this issue, right? This kinda sorta Friendly issue is a nice interlude as Superman faces off against an enemy that I’m not used to seeing him go up against. 7.75/10

 

DC Rebirth Recap And Review For Comics Released 8/30

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

It’s a short week this week as there were only five comics released under the Rebirth banner, two of which are annuals.

ASBM_Cv13_dsAll-Star Batman #13 In a look at Alfred’s past, we see Batman face off against the man that Alfred was training to become. This is a really interesting story, and while I won’t be able to give you all the details in this blurb, you should know that the comic is worth reading. Bordering on Unfriendly, this is another win from Scott Snyder. 7.25/10

Justice League Of America #13 Ray Palmer, the original Atom is lost in the Microverse, and most of the JLA have gone in to find him. This is a pretty Friendly issue when all is said and done. 7/10

Red Hood And The Outlaws Annual #1 The beauty of this annual is that it’s a solid standalone (and Friendly) story featuring the Outlaws and Nightwing. This was genuinely a fun read, and a good introduction to the team. 8/10

Supergirl Annual #1 Unlike the above annual, this comes directly from the previous issues of Supergirl, which I didn’t read, and is far from a standalone story. Despite this, the annual is (just) Friendly6.75/10

Wonder Woman #29 There’s a contract out on Wonder Woman’s head, and a whole bunch of assassins looking to collect. The problem? Diana is currently looking after her injured friend, so the assassins have more to deal with than they bargained for…. this is a Friendly issue, and one of the more enjoyable from the new creative team. 7.5/10

DC Rebirth Recap And Review For Comics Released 7/12

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for

new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

AC_Cv983_open_order_varAction Comics #983 Superman has been attacked by his greatest enemies, and they;ve beaten seven shades of shit out of the Man Of Steel (it doesn’t help that he’ currently blind). Before the final blow came, the cavalry arrived…. it’s a Friendly comic. And really fun.s

Dark Days: The Casting #1 Just… not the best place to jump in. Unfriendly.

Detective Comics #960 I’ve never really been all that familiar with Azreal, nor his backstory, and this arc is pretty heavily steeped in both. An android/dude-in-a-mechsuit with a connection to Azreal’s former bosses has killed a bunch of ex-monks… and Batman’s talking to Zatanna. On the whole this is borderline Unfriendly.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #24  A Green Lantern murdered a Yellow Lantern, and Corps Leader Stewart just found out that a criminal was using this information to blackmail the murderous lantern – and threaten the precarious peace between the two corps.. This issue is Friendly enough.

Justice League Of America #10 Another first part, another chance for you to hop into a series that, personally, I dread reading every month. But you may like it, and if you do you, then I’m pleased for you.

New Super-Man #13 A wonderfully written series, New Super-Man finds our young heroes coming to grips with a foe that’s more powerful than any one of them – Emperor REDHOTO_Cv12.inddSuper-Man! This Friendly issue won’t be the easiest place to jump on, but it’s certainly doable.

The Flash #26 Uh… in a nutshell, Reverse Flash pulled the Flash into the future, revealed his identity to Iris and then decided to show him stuff. Depending on how you like your timey-wimey travel stuff done this is either Friendly and worth reading or best avoided. Personally, I enjoyed it.

Red Hood And The Outlaws #12 You can probably tell what the issue is about by the cover, and it’s homage to the Death Of Superman arc from the 90’s. Bizarro is suffering from cellular degeneration due to his limited life span as a clone, and his teammates aren’t too sure what to do. A Friendly issue in one of the most exciting Batbooks.

Titans #13 The Titans are currently attacking a facility to find Bumble Bee’s memories after they were siphoned off and emailed (or something) somewhere else. What results is an entertaining battle that feature’s a character eerily reminiscent of Valiant’s H.A.R.D. Corps. Is it Friendly kinda.

Wonder Woman #26 The first part of a new arc is always a decent place to hop on board, and this issue is no exception. Assuming you know who Wonder Woman is, this is a Friendly issue.

A New Injustice 2 Trailer Welcomes Red Hood

Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and DC Entertainment today revealed the first gameplay for the next character to be released for its critically acclaimed Injustice 2Red Hood, AKA Jason Todd. Players can see Batman’s second protégé “Robin” turned vigilante in action today in a new trailer. Red Hood will be the first character in Fighter Pack #1 to be released and will be available in June for players who have purchased the Injustice 2 Ultimate Edition, Injustice 2 Digital Deluxe Edition, or Injustice 2 Ultimate Pack.  The character is also available for purchase a la carte.

Developed by the award-winning NetherRealm Studios, Injustice 2 features a massive roster of DC Super Heroes and Super-Villains and allows players to build and power up the ultimate version of their favorite DC characters. The game is currently available for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

DC Rebirth: Recap And Review For 2/8’s Releases

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

There were a lot of new story arcs starting this week, so expect a smaller post as many of the comics didn’t need to much of a recap.


 

dtc_cv950_ds

Action Comics #973 The funny thing about this comic, is that some of the events you’ll need to have a passing familiarity with didn’t actually happen in this issue. Lois Lane and Superman are from the Pre-New 52 DCU, and have found themselves in the post Rebirth world. Now Lois has taken her doppelganger’s place due to a slight case of death but who is the human Clark Kent running around? Meanwhile Superwoman is weakened  and in need of Superman’s help (the reasons why are explained in her own series; Superman doesn’t know why). It’s Friendly, more or less.

All-Star Batman #7 Mr. Freeze released a deadly bacteria last issue, and who better to help with that than a botanist? I actually forgot what was going on in this series and was still able to follow this comic well enough to make it Friendly.

Batgirl And The Birds Of Prey #7 Another Friendly comic. I say this without a recap because I don’t actually remember what happened last issue but I was more than able to follow along here.

Detective Comics #950 The big anniversary issue, and the start of a new arc, so what better place to attract new readers, right? With a bumper sized issue that fleshes out some of the quieter, or lesser known, members of Batman’s new team we get on of the most easily accessible issues in a long time. Each story within is solid is both Friendly, and really quite good.

Flash #16 I didn’t read the last issue, so I can’t really give you much of a recap. Fortunately, the comic does a good job of that on its own, making this an effortlessly Friendly comic.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #14 Part one of a new arc that finds the Green and Yellow Lanterns trying to forge a partnership for the betterment of the cosmos after their numbers were drastically reduced over the course of the last 13 or so issues. This is another Friendly place for you to delve in.

Justice League Of America: Rebirth #1 As with all of the Rebirth specials, this is going to be easy for you to pick up. There seems to be something brewing in the DC Universe, and I’m thinking that with all the hints laced throughout the Batman titles over the past few months, the Batman/Flash series is going to have a part to play in that. Despite my sidetrack, though, this is Friendly.

redhoto_cv7_ds-666x1024Red Hood And The Outlaws #7 All you need to know is that this is a Friendly issue. It’s also relatively standalone, too.

Suicide Squad #11 After the events of the Justice League Vs The Suicide Squad miniseries, Amanda Waller is under investigation for allegedly setting up the whole thing.The Squad are regrouping, but Waller’s up to something. This is a Friendly issue, but only barely.

Supergirl #6 Wraps up an arc in which Supergirl had to choose between resurrecting her family and people or saving her new home. I’m sure you can guess where her loyalties were, which means that if you do grab this issue then you can enjoy the Supergirl vs Cyborg Superman fight – oh, the Cyborg Superman is Supergirl’s father trying to resurrect Kryptonians with a mix of cybernetics and human life force.

Superwoman #7 Lex Luthor is trapped in his armour as his sister wages war with her super powers, and I have no idea what’s happening.

Titans #8  Now that the Titans are reunited with Wally West and settled in Manhattan, this issue sees a new arc kicking off. Because I have next to no experience reading Titans or Teen Titans comics prior to Rebirth, there are some thing I’m not familiar with, such as who a certain character is, but there’s editors notes that let you know where to go to learn more. Overall, this is a Friendly comic.

Wonder Woman #16 The beginning of a new arc finds us at an almost…. Unfriendly  place because I don’t know quite what’s happening, other than I really enjoyed the issue. I’d still suggest you pick this up if you’re curious about the series.

 

Review: Batman and Robin Eternal #3

BMRBET-03-300-001-HD-1-cad48“While the Bat’s away”

So we enter into week three of the half-year epic Batman & Robin Eternal, and while I appreciate that it must be quite a daunting task for any creative team to sustain interest and high level of creativity, it’s important to me as a reader that they don’t simply phone it in.

Each issue should be constructed almost like an episode of a season of a tv show with individual events but a long reaching overall story arc. While the first week was a big splash right out the gate and last weeks was lackluster, this one was somewhere right in the middle.

The theme that all of Batman’s former young proteges are being targeted from a secret menace from his past is very intriguing. The new villain “Mother” could have lots of promise if handled properly. I have been thoroughly impressed with the “Bat books” since the rebirth of the New 52 a few years ago. So many concepts were revamped and updated with great achievement. Sure it’s a bit wacky that we are to believe in the new condensed continuity that Batman has had four Robins (Dick, Jason, Tim and Damian) in just 5 years (Talk about not longstanding job security) but hey that’s comics.

So on to the issue. The skinny here, is that Mother has a list, and all the Robins and former teenage sidekicks and even one current one (Harper Row) are on it. It’s not a good list, like the Dean’s list. This is bad news indeed.

Last issue we were treated to a yawn of a slugfest with a new villain named The Orphan, kicking our heroes collective butts, with no real explanation. This week we open up with the resident hothead of the Robin’s: Jason Todd, now known as Red Hood about to execute the ninja newbie Cassandra Cain. To Jason’s surprise she is more than ready for him. As Jason gets the upper hand though, big brother Robin, Dick Grayson aka Nightwing aka Agent 37 (Seriously Dick, pick one) steps in with words of peace to calm this kill fest down.

Red Robin (These guys sure love colors in their names) suggests if they are going to try to solve a mystery like the old days, there’s only one place to go: The Batcave. When they arrive in an effort of complete transparency (guess we are not in Congress) Dick plays Bruce’s secret message for his team. Team Robin tries to make heads or tails of it but with no real results. All they know is that “Mother” is some kind of teen agent human trafficker with deadly intentions and very vast resources.

Like the TV show Arrow, This story makes common use of flashbacks to give us crumbs to follow to piece the mystery together. (At this point though, you can yank my junior detective badge because I got squat) 

What we are shown in the flashback is more details of a case that Bruce and Dick worked on very early in their crime fighting careers as Batman and Robin. This one particular tidbit comes from the Dynamic Duo’s legendary first tussle with Dr. Jonathan Crane aka The Scarecrow. Robin (Dick) has been exposed to The Scarecrow’s “fear toxin” and nothing is seeming to shake the effects. In an effort to restore his partner to sanity, Bruce removes his Batman cowl and ask Dick what he’s seeing. In short Dick explained to him that the toxin makes him see his greatest fears and his fear of being a failure to Batman. Basically a failure that could resonate in any loving father-son relationship.

Just as Robin pours his heart out, Batman slips the cowl back on and heads out on the case.(wow a bit harsh in my view, but he is Batman after all) 

Here’s where it gets dicey. Batman was exposed to the fear toxin, the same as Robin, however he tells him that he was not effected at all. Hmm, I’m sure this will come into play later but for now I’m stumped. Perhaps at this stage in The Scarecrow’s career the “toxin” only effects adolescents? I’m not quite sure but they put bait on the hook because the writers got me here.

As for the rest of the issue we are treated a look at the non Bat- Bruce Wayne and left with yet another cliffhanger. I really wish the creative team would get us back the the great cliffhanger bomb they dropped on us back in issue one but I guess a modicum of patience is required.

Overall: As I pointed out this is a weekly story and takes time to build. However a weekly saga needn’t be a “weak” saga. I like the flashback scenes so far and that issue one cliffhanger was killer. I’m just not properly feeling it yet. At least the writers have another 23 weeks to turn me around. On the plus side, the art by Paul Pelletier and Scot Eaton was very polished and dynamic. I feel they have a terrific handle on the look of these characters without making them look juvenile. I particularly love the revamped design of Dick Grayson’s Robin costume for this era. It invokes a lot of the original Tim Drake costume design from the early 1990’s (One of my personal favorites) and there is nothing wrong with that. While I’m not floored yet at this juncture, like a loyal fan I will see how this plays out. So for the foreseeable future you can catch my weekly review here. Press the tights and check the utility belts, till next week same Bat .. err bird time, same bird channel!

Story: James Tynion IV, Tim Seeley, and Scott Snyder  Art: Paul Pelletier, Scott Eaton
Story: 6 Art: 8 Overall 6.5 Recommendation: Read

Review: Red Hood/Arsenal #1

rha001Following on the potential for the mini-reboot in the post-Convergence DC Universe comes this series, ostensibly what is left of Red Hood and the Outlaws after Starfire was split off for her own series.  The series of Red Hood and the Outlaws followed a strange course.  The first issue was one of the most discussed about issues in modern history, up there with the first issue of Spider-Woman, and specifically because of its portrayal of its female main character.  While the series maintained what was usually a sophomoric approach to story telling, it did improve over time, and the initial controversy faded over what became the three characters gelling together.

While the idea to split off Starfire is perhaps an odd one considering that her own new series seems a bit directionless at the moment, the remainder of the team is what it is, even if it is a bit light on members.  The introduction is even lighter.  With Starfire gone Roy is working on his own, in the middle of the desert tracking a prisoner handover between a drug cartel and the U.S. government.  Roy is a little lost in his thoughts at times as he is dealing with the departure of Kory, and things get worse when the outcome of the handover is not as planned, or at least not by everyone except for Roy.  It is a fairly basic and straightforward introduction to the character, but it does allow to get the ball rolling with the return of what is left of the team.

Part of the problem with this series as it has been before in the new 52 was its lack of interest to those who were not fans of the two characters.  As it stands it doesn’t seem as though they have managed to break that trend.  While this is a decent enough introduction to the characters for those looking to jump on board for a #1, it also ends up feeling a bit like an inside joke as the series often has before.  It would do better to reach out to a broader base of fans, as the characters are fun, but by not doing so it ends up being a bit mediocre.

Story: Scott Lobdell  Art: Dennis Medri 
Story: 7.2 Art: 7.2  Overall: 7.2  Recommendation: Pass

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