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NYCC 2016: Talking Lion Forge’s Catalyst Prime with Joe Illidge

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Ever since Lion Forge announced a new line-up of hires, it’s been a company to watch. You don’t bring on that sort of talent without having a bigger plan and something up your sleeve.

I’ve watched intently parsing every word said by staff and every hint dropped to try and figure out what exactly what was being worked on.

At New York Comic Con, we found out what that was.

At their panel Sunday, Lion Forge announced “Catalyst Prime,” a new superhero universe with a killer amount of talent writing, drawing, coloring, and lettering, and diversity on the page and behind the scenes. But, impressively it’s also established and new talent alike working together to create this new world. That’s something that’s important for the company, to bring together old and new voices.

Along with the creative talent it was announced that Desiree Rodriguez is joining the company as an editorial assistant for the new line. Rodriguez is a freelancer for Nerds of Color who wrote this fantastic piece about being Latinx in comics.

Before the panel, I got to speak with Senior Editorial Manager Joe Illidge and got the details as to what we can expect.

Graphic Policy: It’s been months of teasing and hints and I know I’m excited to hear the details. What’s the scoop as to what Lion Forge has announced at New York Comic Con 2016?

Joe Illidge: We’re announcing the creation of a new superhero universe which will be under the title of “Catalyst Prime.” There will be seven monthly books and the line will launch in May of 2017.

GP: Who’s the talent that’ll be involved that you can announce?

JI: For the kick off book it’s going to be mainly written by Christopher Priest, co-written by myself with the art by Marco Turini, letterer Deron Bennett, and colorist Jessica Kholine. For the first ongoing series with a Black male lead, the writer is Brandon Thomas, artist Ken Lashley, letters by Saida Temofonte, and colorist Juan Fernandez. The second main book about an interracial duo, it’s co-written by David Walker and Dr. Sheena Howard, illustrated by Chuck Collins, and colored by Veronica Gandini. The third book is written by Joe Casey, illustrated by Damion Scott, lettered by Janice Chiang, and will be colored by John Rauch. The fourth book will be a team book written by Joe Casey with story consultation by Ramon Govea who created the concept, illustrated by Larry Stroman and Rob Stull, and colored by Snakebite Cortez. For the fifth title with a British male lead which is a science fiction thriller, it’ll be written by Joe Casey, illustrated by Jefte Palo who is well known for illustrating the Black Panther Secret Invasion storyline in which the Wakandans held back the Skrull invasion, it’ll be colored by Chris Sotomayor, and lettered by a legendary letterer. The letterer of the Hugo award winning Sandman Overture graphic novel, Todd Klein. The sixth title with a White male lead will be written by Alex De Campi, illustrated by Pop Mhan, and lettered by Deron Bennett. Deron Bennett is doing a bunch of DC “Rebirth” books. One prominent one is Batgirl. The seventh title with a lesbian lead character will be written by Amy Chu, illustrated by Jan Duursema, colored by Kelly Fitzpatrick, and lettered by Deron Bennett.

GP: That’s impressive you can remember and name all of them. So what can you tell us specifically about the series?

JI: Well basically the whole universe is started from an asteroid heading to Earth and a private corporation called the Foresight Corporation, which produced our teaser memo, they send four astronauts on a suicide mission to stop the asteroid. What happens leads to the emergence of super humans on our world. After that, most of the books will take place one year after that.

GP: As far as the comics, how are they kicking off, a mini-series and then everything launches from there?

JI: It’s going to start with a one-shot co-written by Christopher Priest and myself, coming out the first week of May 2017. And then we’ll be rolling out the books from there, from May through December.

GP: That’s an amazing group of talent working on the comic that’s very diverse, what about the characters?

JI: The characters are diverse. Of the four astronauts, you have two women, one of whom is lesbian, one of whom is Black. The two men, one is Black and one is British. The other three are American. Then there’s also a Chinese woman who is part of mission control who is supervising the mission in space, but was not one of the four astronauts.

GP: That certainly is diverse. When putting the series together, was this a priority and thought through?

JI: It was thought through in the sense that the owner David Steward II, the President Geoff Gerber, and I are really committed to creating a universe that invites everyone. Diversity is a buzzword that has become obsolete because it’s been used for a lot of PR. Diversity should be intrinsic if you have an expanded mindset and worldview so when you’re going to creators they’re not all heterosexual, they’re not all Caucasian males. They might not all be from the United States. They’re from different industries. They have different political backgrounds. Diversity is automatic. But we want to create something new and exciting that doesn’t have a burden of decades of continuity. We want everyone to feel invited to this world and this world will evolve into a world that will more accurately reflect the demographics of the one that we live more than a lot of other fictional superhero comic universes.

GP: When it comes to the writers… there’s a habit lately that writers are pigeonholed into what they write based on the color of their skin or their gender, in November out of 13 female writers for the big two only one was writing a comic with a male lead as an example, are you breaking that mold?

JI: I am breaking that mold. The book that is going to have the latino teenager lead is going to be written by Joe Casey whom is neither Latino nor a teenager. But, Joe Casey has clearly been an advocate for variety in superhero comic books, in creator owned comic books. And frankly he’s the co-creator of America Chavez. To me, that right there, America Chavez is one of the most beloved Latinx characters of our time. So I’m comfortable with him writing a Latinx character considering he created one of the most popular ones right now.

GP: He’s shown he can do it.

JI: Exactly.

GP: One of the things that caught my eye in your teases was a woman writing a male character, so it’s either Dr. Sheena Howard, Amy Chu, or Alex De Campi.

JI: What it is, the book that will be co-written by David Walker and Dr. Sheena Howard is an interracial team book written by a man and a woman featuring a man and a woman. That really came down to whom I feel David and Sheena are as people. Due to their academic backgrounds. Due to their vast social and cultural knowledge. Due to the fact they are both social crusaders, they are expertly qualified to tell this story.

Amy Chu is going to be writing a story about a Caucasian lesbian. Alex De Campi will be writing a story with a white American male lead. So you don’t have to keep these straight lines. Some of them won’t be straight for the sake of being straight. I really tried to see who were the best creators to tell these stories book by book.

GP: With the baggage that comes with continuity and years of stories, are you thinking through that as you put together this universe and series? A perfect example is Valiant that has continuity but you can read just one series, step into a new story arc, there’s clear starting points, or you can enjoy it all.

JI: Absolutely. No two books will be alike aesthetically. We want readers to be able to read a book and not feel like they are trapped or tricked into reading other books. If you read other books and you keep moving forward, you start seeing connected threads, and you get the benefit of the worldview of this entire thing. If you choose just one book, or two books, or four books, you can have individual experiences and as we look forward to the first crossover event, which will probably take place in 2018, that will be a story in of itself. If you choose to keep reading your book, you can do that. It’s very important for us that the reader not feel interrupted in the book, or books, that they like. It’s also important that when we collect these books we really want to engage the book market. We want to create volumes where a new reader can pick up any volume and get into that world. Whether it’s across titles or whether they pick up volume two of any series and we hope that they don’t feel like that have to pick up volume one but instead that they’ll want to pick up and read volume one.

It really comes down to characters. Characters are the underpinning of all stories. We want to create characters that the readers will care about. We want you to come along on the journey with these characters. So, by defining the characters, making them compelling, and making them relatable, is the ultimate way that we can invite readers, old and new, into the universe.

GP: Is the universe set in our world or slightly off? Do we get fake countries or ones that actually exist?

JI: It’s going to be our world geographically, all the identifications will match up to Earth. I look at this as the love child of Darwyn Cooke’s DC New Frontier and Vertigo Year One and the brilliance of Karen Berger in using Animal Man, Doom Patrol, Shade, the Changing Man, Black Orchid, and Kid Eternity as the foundation for a truly imaginative and impressive body of books. These will be super hero genre books, but they’ll also engage in other genres like science fiction, techno thriller, young adult, action adventure, teen adventure, social drama, so that is how I see it. For that to be the case, it had to take place in a world like ours.

GP: Since it is taking place in a world familiar to ours, there’s the debate as to whether comics should just be entertainment or if it should touch upon social justice issues being waged. Will the comics touch upon real world issues? From the characters and what you’ve described it sounds like social issues will be a natural thing for the series, but is it a goal and point?

JI: You know, we don’t see it as a hard agenda. It’s not something we’re going to beat the audience over the head with as far as the stories. When you’re talking about social justice, art has always been a vehicle for social justice.

GP: Comics always have.

JI: Exactly. We’re at a time where we are vulnerable in so many other areas. Our bodies are vulnerable. We’re being told what bathrooms we can use. We have political icons engaging in reprehensible behavior, xenophobia, and sexism. Art may be one of the last frontiers that is bullet proof. If you’re going to do a universe, and you’re going to engage the super hero and what the super hero can do, how can you not engage in social justice?

GP: How long has this been in the works?

JI: It’s funny, there has been different stages. I started working at Lion Forge in June and I really expanded it. The origins of the “Catalyst Prime” super hero universe starts with the owner of Lion Forge, David Steward II. As someone highly influence by Milestone, we are obviously simpatico on that front, myself being a Milestone alumni, Geoff Gerber the President of Lion Forge being an advocate for social justice, the three of us together really wanted this to be something special that would invite everybody. It started with the owner, but when I came in I took the nucleaus and put together a team of writers. We did a writers retreat where we all sat down in a room and spent a day and basically nurtured this universe to life and that kind of creativity, that imaginative osmosis, the results of that are really going to be seen in the books. You’re going to see us subvert some familiar archetypes. You’re going to see some characters of ethnic backgrounds that you never thought you’d equate with roles of power. We’re really looking to give you the kind of familiar things you want with super hero comic books, but we want to return fun and imagination to super hero comic books.

It feels like right now we’ve hit a critical mass in terms of cynicism, in terms of doubt, in terms of dissapointment, for the faith and investment of time we have given. I want this super hero unvierse be a return to fun and imagination and the consumer being rewarded for their time and love of this genre and this medium.

GP: With starting a comic line now, it feels like it’d be different because it’s no longer just print you’re dealing with. There’s digital, there’s mobile, there’s web, the avenues and distribution is so different. Is that in your thoughts in putting it together, looking at the big picture and how different people will interact differently with the material?

JI: Absolutely. It’s very important for us that anyone who wants to get our books will be able to get our books. Whether it is comic book stories in the direct market. Whether it’s book stores and collections in the trade market. Whether it’s digital. We have been looking at a lot of metrics and data in regards to digital comics. Some of those discoveries will impact how we put together and provide these books. And it’s very important to us that if you’re unfortunately living in a place that’s a comic store desert, you can still get the book. It’s important to us that if you feel there’s a local environment that’s not welcoming to you as a consumer that you can still get our book. It’s important to us that we engage in a discussion with retailers and consumers about pre-ordering so that we expand the vocabulary and help consumers get our books.

GP: Any final thoughts?

JI: It’s exciting for us to start this new thing. I think culturally that we are at a high point of the popularity and the agency of the super hero as a genre and so there’s no better time to start a new universe than right now. I firmly believe, and the creators that I’ve assembled, we all firmly believe that ultimately people want good stories. It’s not about what genre it is. It’s about good stories and good characters.

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Preview: Revolution: The Road to Revolution 100-Page Special #1

Revolution: The Road to Revolution 100-Page Special #1

Simon Furman, Chuck Dixon, John Barber, James Roberts, Mairghread Scott, Karen Traviss (w) • Robert Atkins, Brendan Cahill, Guido Guidi, E.J. Su, Steve Kurth, Andrew Griffith, Alex Milne, Sara Pitre-Durocher, Sarah Stone (a) • Pop Mhan (c)

Ten years of TRANSFORMERS and G.I. JOE comics have led to this month’s REVOLUTION! This bargain-priced bonanza presents five key stories that have paved the road to the universe being born this month! From the first-ever IDW Transformers comic to the Karen Traviss G.I. JOE, the building blocks of this universe have been growing for years!

FC • 100 pages • $7.99

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The Adventures of Supergirl Gets a Print Edition, Twice Monthly

2E449F00-4058-416F-B4C7-F62F6DDC5011[7]Due to popular demand, DC Entertainment will now be offering The Adventures of Supergirl as a limited-run six-issue periodical, prior to the collected edition release this fall.The Adventures of Supergirl will now ship twice monthly for three months, beginning with The Adventures of Supergirl #1 (collecting Digital First chapters 1-3) on May 11th, 2016.

The Adventures of Supergirl is a Digital First comic book series that launched online in January 2016, inspired by the CBS hit TV series Supergirl. Critically acclaimed series writer Sterling Gates is joined by a cast of rotating artists including Bengal, Jonboy Meyers, Pop Mhan, Emanuela Lupacchino, Carmen Carnero, Cat Staggs and Emma Vieceli.

Paralleling but not duplicating storylines from the Monday night TV show, The Adventures of Supergirl introduces fans to Kara Zor-El, who is determined to grow into the super-hero her powers promise. But are dark forces pushing her to improve faster than is safe? As Supergirl faces classic DCU villains like Rampage, Vril Dox and Psi, she’s got no reason to suspect that their attacks have been coordinated, but when the final battle comes to a head, she’ll need to use all of her training, her DEO contacts, her friends’ talents and her sister’s love and support to get through it all!

Check out the first four covers by Cat Staggs, two of which make their debut, with two more to come! Look for The Adventures of Supergirl both online now and soon in your local comic book shop.

The Adventures of Supergirl digital chapters are available for download bi-weekly on Monday via the DC Comics App, Readdcentertainment.com, iBooks, comiXology.com, Google Play, Kindle Store, Nook Store, and iVerse ComicsPlus.

Review: He-Man: The Eternity War #15

HEMEW 15 Print CoverI am Adam Prince of Eternia and defender of the secrets of Castle Greyskull. This is Cringer, my fearless friend. Fabulous secret powers were revealed to me the day I held aloft my magic sword and said “By the power of Greyskull!”, “I have the power!”, Cringer became the Mighty Battle Cat, and I became He-Man the most powerful man in the Universe. Only a few others share this secret, our friends: the Sorceress, Man-At-Arms and Orko. Together we defend Castle Greyskull from the evil forces of Skeletor.

The Eternity War against Skeletor is over. He-Man finally has defeated his arch nemesis but at a great cost. Many of He-Man’s friends and family have perished. Prince Adam has dreams of the future right after the Eternity War, dreams of eventually rebuilding the “Masters of the Universe.” Now several months after the war, the survivors are migrating to Castle Greyskull to live their lives and to re-build. Prince Adam has a plan to help the people and together with Teela and Stratos, Eternia will be alive and well again.

I read this issue three times as I wanted to look at every detail and read every word to really get it’s full impact. The story line was great. Dan Abnett did a great job in this issue of talking bout the present and the future of He-Man and Eternia. It was great to see She-Ra, I don’t think she get enough credit in the comic book world but she is a great character.

The one thing I do wish is that they would talk more about those who perished. I know that there is only so many pages to work with in a comic book, but I think there should have been a homage somewhere. I also like seeing Prince Adam in a more defining role instead of the lazy Prince who doesn’t like to train to fight much like in the beginning of the original 1980’s cartoon series.

Visually it was spectacular! Artist Pop Mhan and colorist Mark Roberts, did a fantastic job in this book. Everything was spot on from Prince Adam’s attire, to Teela and She-Ra’s Armour. The colors really popped and and was really appeasing to the eye.

I thoroughly enjoyed this comic and I can’t wait to read the next one. I was hoping it wasn’t too far removed from what I grew up with as a child and it definitely was all there. Go out and get a copy immediately!

Story: Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan Colors: Mark Roberts
Story:9 Artwork 10 Overall 9.5 Recommendation: Read

Exclusive Preview: He-Man: The Eternity War #15

He-Man: The Eternity War #15

Written by: Dan Abnett
Art by: Pop Mhan
Cover by: Szymon Kudranski

After issue #14’s shocking conclusion, the victors of the Eternity War rise from the rubble…to rebuild the future! Who has lived? Who has died? What is the future of the Masters of the Universe saga? Find out in this rousing epilogue to the modern day He-Man epic, “The Eternity War”!

HEMEW 15 Print Cover

Exclusive Preview: He-Man: The Eternity War #10

He-Man: The Eternity War #10

Written by: Dan Abnett
Art by: Pop Mhan
Cover by: Pop Mhan

I am Skeletor, devil of Eternia and raider of the secrets of Castle Grayskull. Fearsome powers were revealed to me the day I held aloft my frightful sword and said, ‘By the power of Grayskull, I am the power!’

He-Man: The Eternity War #10 is out this Wednesday, September 23.

HEMEW 10 Print Cover

Review: He-Man Eternity War #8

ew008Eternity War, the latest He-Man story arc, has had some ups and downs during its series.  This is to be somewhat expected, as for every big moment, there is some time required to set it up and to build the characters into pertinent actors for the script.  The previous issue of Eternity War could be said to be one which had some big moments, although these were more like big character developments which focused around She-Ra’s and Skeletor’s past.  With these big developments right behind it, it probably left many wondering what was immediately ahead for the series.

The story is related in parts to the previous issue, but also throws in a bit of extra unexpected developments.  Adam has chosen to become depowered, and is keen on returning Eternos to his control.  Such is done by a costly victory over the forces of Hordak, the villain who clearly has bigger plans to follow as opposed to immediately stopping Adam.  This leads to the strongest dramatic point for the issue, although it is mirrored in the travels of Skeletor and She-Ra.  Skeletor has led her to the dark dimension, but he has plans of his own, not exactly in line with what he had told her in the previous issue.

While the series is still running at its best, it still feels like this issue is a bit of an intermission.  With so many new developments it is necessary to reposition the players so that they can be put into places where their true heroism can shine through.  That is what is happening here, and it feels a bit more sedate than other issues in this series, mostly because it cannot rely on any of these big moments, but instead has to get by on some other plot developments which while fun, are also a bit ordinary.  The same format has been used before in this series to set up its big moments, as for instance the mostly action second issue showed that there was still a lot of other great moments to follow.  Such would most likely be the moment here, as there are no big moments, but there promises to be in issues to come.

Story: Rob David and Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Comic Art House Hosts Talent at the 2015 Baltimore Comic-Con

Comic Art HouseBuy your VIP and General Admission Tickets now the 2015 Baltimore Comic-Con, taking place the weekend of September 2527, 2015 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Baltimore Comic-Con is welcoming a slew of creators from their friends at Comic Art House.

Comic Art House, owned and operated by Bob Shaw, Kim Shaw and Jarrett Melendez, was founded in 2007 in Manchester, NH. In those early days, the company started small, representing ten professional comic artists. Now, just 8 years later, Comic Art House boasts more than 65 of the industry’s most talented artists. Their crew’s artwork has graced the pages of countless publications produced by Marvel, DC, Image, IDW, Dark Horse, Dynamite, BOOM! Studios, Archie Comics, and more. Join them in Baltimore’s beautiful Inner Harbor for a weekend of comic excitement.

Scott Ambruson artist, The Collectors, Trailer Park of Terror, Crime Wave Anthology, AZTECA and Destiny, Queen of Thieves.

Talent Caldwell artist, Action Comics, Batgirl, Gen13, Spectacular Spider-Man, and X-Men: Age of Apocalypse.

Chris Campana artist, Kantara, First World, Vigilante Project, and Realm of the Underworld.

Katie Cook writer/artist, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, Fraggle Rock, and Gronk.

Joe Eisma artist, Morning Glories, Archer and Armstrong, Archie, Bill and Ted’s Most Triumphant Return, and Hoax Hunters.

Keron Grant artist, New X-Men, Iron Man, and Spider-Man.

Laura Guzzo artist, Roadkill du Jour, Shakespeare Shaken, and PrinceLess: Short Stories for Warrior Women.

h-eri artist, Dominion and Shadowfist.

Ken Hunt artist, Bloodlines and Talon.

Mike Lilly artist, Nightwing, Vampirella, X-Men Unlimited, Quasar, Catwoman, Punisher, and Grimm Fairy Tales.

Pop Mhan artist, Amazing Spider-Man, Batgirl, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, and All-New X-Factor.

NEN artist, Legend of the Five Rings and Shinobi Clans, The Memory Collectors, Aspen’s Damsels in Excess, and Justice League.

Brent Peeples artist, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,TMNT/Ghostbusters, X-O Manowar, Godzilla Cataclysm, and Legenderry: Green Hornet.

Andy Price artist, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, Adventure Time, Littlest Pet Shop, and Wordgirl.

Sara Richard artist, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, Deadpool, and Jem and the Holograms.

Craig Rousseau creator, The Perhapanauts, and Kyrra: Alien Jungle Girl; artist, Impulse, Batman Beyond, Gotham Adventures, Harley Quinn, and Captain America.

Matt Slay artist, TMNT/Ghostbusters crossover and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Micro Series: Leonardo.

Ben Templesmith artist Fell, Wormwood: Gentleman Corpse, Gotham by Midnight, 30 Days of Night, The Squidder, and Dagon.

Mark ‘Tex’ Texeira artist, Wolverine, Punisher, Ghost Rider, Sabretooth, Moon Knight, and Space Punisher.

Jeremy Treece artist, Flash Gordon, Hero@Large, Marvel Zombies: Christmas Carol, and Mandrake the Magician.

Rich Woodall creator, Johnny Raygun, Kyrra: Alien Jungle Girl, Zombie Bomb! Comic Anthology; artist, Powerpuff Girls and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

Review: He-Man and the Masters of the Universe #18

she-raAlthough introduced fairly early into the stories of He-Man there has never been a very good way to overlap the stories of his sister with his own.  He-Man was at first a toy and then later a television series and comic, which was wildly popular among boys in the early 1980s.

Seeing the success of the franchise in one demographic, the creators tried their hand at a related franchise that would appeal to girls and they came up with She-Ra.  Although the animated show had some success, with two seasons compared to He-Man’s three, it never gained the same traction in terms of a fan base.  The characters were a weird mix of dolls and action figures, with the main character Adora/She-Ra focused equally on love as on fighting her mortal enemy, Hordak.   I remember as a young boy eager to fill out my own collection of action figures, that I took one look at a discounted Bow and scoffing and walking away, such a blatant romantic interest that he has a heart on his chest.  Equally although there must have been some, I never met a girl that collected She-Ra figures.   She-Ra has always been a character in need of a home and never really able to find one.

He-Man and the related characters now exist in popular culture primarily as comic book characters and since the relaunch of DC Comics into the new 52, has formed one of the sole ongoing and reliable series not tied to the main universe.  As a comic franchise it has had its ups-and-downs, though one constant has been an attempt to integrate She-Ra into the storylines.  The conclusion of the Blood of Grayskull story line introduces the character into He-Man universe as well as has probably ever been done.   Gone are the somewhat hoaky aspects of the character, replaced only by a strong story, which spanned 6 issues of the series and 1000 years of comic book time.

This final issue of the story arc is still one that is not going to be extremely moving for a lot of readers, as it borrows heavily from aspects of science fiction, fantasy and comic clichés to give a mostly action-focused story.  Nonetheless it is still interesting to read, well-produced and flows well with the bits of story and dialogue moving the action along well.  Fans of the franchise might be particularly interested in this issue, as after nearly thirty years it gives Adora a proper home and a new meaning.

Story: Dan Abnett Art: Pop Mhan
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Baltimore Comic-Con 2014: Welcome Christina Blanch, Norman Lee, and Pop Mhan!

charliewormwoodThe Baltimore Comic-Con‘s inaugural 3-day event takes place on FridaySunday, September 5-7, 2014 at the Baltimore Convention Center! They have announced the addition of Christina Blanch, Norman Lee, and Pop Mhan!

Christina Blanch came to comics via education — she is a teacher who found the medium geared for the classroom and one-on-one instruction. She has taught on college campuses, in the correctional system, and in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) such as “Gender Through Comic Books”. Her Thrillbent Comics title The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood is making the transition to print through Dynamite Entertainment.

ironmanNorman Lee went to school for fashion illustration. After experiencing some burnout in that field, he began helping a friend in the comics industry in 1995 with backgrounds, and his career as an inker was underway! He spent most of his professional life working for Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse Comics, and has inked pretty much every major character in the Marvel Universe! His lines can be seen in the recent Iron Man Special #1 from Marvel Comics.

spidermanPop Mhan was lucky enough to get his jump into the comics industry under the tutelage of Jim Lee at Wildstorm Productions. Since those early days, his art has graced the pages of comics from Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Top Cow, Dark Horse Comics, and Tokyopop. His recent work can be seen at DC Comics, where he has been penciling licensed properties like Gears of War 3 and He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, and Marvel Comics on All-New X-Factor and variant covers for Amazing Spider-Man.

The Baltimore Comic-Con will be held Friday, September 5 through Sunday, September 7, 2014, at the Baltimore Convention Center, which is located immediately across the street from the historic Camden Yards sports complex (which includes Oriole Park and Geppi’s Entertainment Museum). Tickets, a full guest roster, and additional information is available on the convention’s website.

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