Tag Archives: paper girls

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

angelcatbird.0Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: A&A: The Aventures Of Archer And Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – The last issue was one of the better ones I’ve read in this series, which is saying a lot when it comes to A&A’s quality.  I’m remarkably excited to get my grubby mitts on this issue.

Angel Catbird Vol.1 (Dark Horse) – The early reviews I’ve read have been very good, which is awesome. Other than the cover and the preview text, I know next to nothing about the TPb other than it’s apparently very good. Sometimes, that’s the only reason you need to read something.

Batman #6 (DC Comics) – Another week, another Batman comic. Strangely, the twice-monthly shipping isn’t bothering me as much as I thought it would… probably because Tom King and David Finch are still going very strong right now.

Moon Knight #6 (Marvel) – I think I must be one of the very few people for whom this series isn’t clicking for. I recognise it’s good, but I’ve been picking it up primarily because of the art, not the quality of the story. But I have faith in Jeff Lemire, and I’ve also found the series has been getting better issue by issue. At some point, the series is going to click for me, and I’m really hoping its here.

Ninjak #19 (Valiant) – Ninjak’s team up with the Eternal Warrior continues here, and it’s a safe bet that any comic featuring the Eternal Warrior will be on my pull list – this comic is no exception. Although not quite as good as Wrath of the Eternal Warrior, this story is only one issue in.

 

Anthony

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Jim Zub has been part of a slew of excellent titles throughout his career, including the current ongoing at Image, Wayward. Glitterbomb looks to be another intriguing concept from Zub with newcomer artist Djibril Morissette-Phan. The premise looks to attack celebrity culture and fame with a twist of horror and violence. Morissette-Phan, whose previewed art, with the colours of K. Michael Russell, makes this series look even more intriguing and gritty.Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and

Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and center vigilante-esque protagonist whose agenda to kill those deemed as scum of the Earth is initiated by a mysterious demon after a failed suicide attempt. It’s too early to tell whether this is more of a projection of the mindset of Dylan or a full on horror element part of the story. Either way, this looks to be another hit title for a team that continues to impress.

Paper Girls #9 (Image Comics) – With another Erin (whom may or may not be one to trust according to the last issue) thrown into the mix, things are getting pretty hectic in the present time. Oh, and there are some gigantic monsters fighting amidst the city.

A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – Archer and Armstrong have found themselves amongst a circus troupe of Armstrong doppelgangers as the duo continue their journey to find the immortal’s long-lost wife. A&A continues to be one of the funniest and more entertaining comics on the stands that never fails to be filled with laugh out loud moments.

Kim and Kim #2 (Black Mask Studios) – The first issue of Kim and Kim introduced an energetic and colourful world centered around bounty hunters Kimiko Quatro and Kimber Dantzler. They have propelled themselves forward into the midst of a pretty heavy situation involving a particular bounty that looks to be the driving force for Kim and Kim. With a real punk aesthetic and

 

Shay

This is a damn good week for comic book lovers. Whether you’re into the big boys of DC and Marvel , or the mini majors with an indie edge like Image. It’s about time to get your geek on!

Top Pick: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #1 (Vertigo) – Full disclosure, I am such a Fables fan that I have a tattoo of the cover of issue #7 on my arm. Of course, I’m hella hyped for something new from the geniuses behind the Fables brand. Here’s to more bad ass ladies, shifty bad guys and what I’m sure will be a fun ride. Philip Willingham himself recommends it and it’s from The Wolf Among Us creators.

Rise of the Black Flame #1 (Dark Horse) – There’s a cult, missing girls, the jungle of Siam! It sounds like an adventure mystery that will give you chills!

Batman Arkham: Poison Ivy TP (DC Comics) – All of Poison Ivy’s ( aka Red) greatest hits and fights against Batman in one place. Who doesn’t like a little female bad assery ?

Color Your Own Women of Power (Marvel) – It’s a fun time and a coloring book for fans. You can now color in ( or out of ) the lines and make your own fantasy costumes for your fave lady superheroes. What’s not to love about the chance to put something functional on your faves?

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Looks like it has some promise. Dark forces beyond our control hell bent on tearing down celebrity culture and beauty. Should be a fun read and an interesting series of it plays its cards right and shows us the ugly behind the beauty.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Sheriff of Babylon #10 (Vertigo) – Hands down the best comic out there right now. It’s entertaining, but also a brutal and honest look at life in Iraq post war. Writer Tom King gives a visceral feel to each issue and artist Mitch Gerads’ art is absolutely amazing in its detail.

Cyborg: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – A new creative team takes on Cyborg and I’m really intrigued to see where writer John Semper Jr. takes the character.

Supergirl #1 (DC Comics) – I really enjoyed writer Steve Orlando’s take on the character in his Rebirth issue. He’s clearly focused on the teenage and immigrant aspects of the character and making sure it’s all fun too.

Alters #1 (Aftershock Comics) – I’m intrigued on this one which sees a world where people are changing by gaining powers, but also a new hero is transitioning from male to female at the same time as gaining powers. I hold my breathe hoping this one is a story featuring a transgender character done right, but who knows.

Eclipse #1 (Image Comics) – An interesting concept of a world where sunlight kills people so the survivors are forced to live in nocturnal cities and someone begins to use it as a weapon for murder. Sounds original and intriguing.

 

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

killorbekilled01-coverWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Anthony

Top Pick: Kill or Be Killed #1 (Image Comics) Praise the comic Gods or whomever for the beginning of another series from Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser. If you haven’t read anything by this creative team, that needs to change…now. The premise remains fairly mysterious with the focus being on an individual whose vigilante actions of killing those that have wronged others begins to affect the people he keeps around him. The creative team and collaborative efforts of Brubaker and Phillips have yet to disappoint so this is a definite must read/buy.

Paper Girls #8 (Image Comics) – Fresh from its Eisner wins for Best New Series and Best Penciller/Inker for Cliff Chiang, Paper Girls continues to be one of the best titles being released not only by Image, but any publisher period. The mystery continues to thicken with a monthly treat of Chiang’s images with Matt Wilson’s bold colours and Brian K. Vaughan’s smart, fast paced script.

Tokyo Ghost #9 (Image Comics) – It is unfortunate that this has to be the penultimate issue of Tokyo Ghost. This series has been an entertaining, thought-provoking ride that will surely set up quite the finale from the fantastic creative team of Rick Remender, Sean Gordon Murphy, and Matt Hollingsworth.

Lady Killer 2 #1 (Dark Horse) – Writer/Artist Joelle Jones is back with more Lady Killers! The first series was an absolute delight, diving into the life of Josie Schuller whom juggles between her life as a 1950s housewife and contract killer. Colourist Michelle Madsen looks to pick up the reigns of Laura Allred from the last series and looks to be in more than capable hands judging from the gorgeous, sleek preview pages.

4001 A.D. War Mother #1 (Valiant) – The most anticipated one shot from the 4001 event from Valiant was a mystery for a good portion of time. When it was revealed that it would focus on a character introduced during the Book of Death and to be written by Fred Van Lente, the level of curiosity rose. Once some preview pages revealed the mind blowing pencil work of Tomas Giorello, the attention of many was officially grabbed.

 

Alex

Top Pick: 4001 A.D.: War Mother #1 (Valiant) – So this is Valiant’s mystery comic that’s tying into  4001 A.D., eh? With all the hype that the publisher have been trying to build around it, I really hope it’s half as good as they seem to think it is, because if my guess is right this could be a launching point for an entirely new set of stories in the 4001 A.D. time-frame.

Dishonored #1 (Titan Comics) – I loved this game when I played it on PS3 a couple years ago, so I’m excited to see where the story has progressed to since the end of the game. I’m also expecting this to be less than excellent, but I’m always

Evil Heroes #1 (Zenescope Entertainment) – I’m not gonna lie, this is here solely because of the name. I know nothing else about the comic…Moon Knight #5 (Marvel)

Moon Knight #5 (Marvel) – Moon Knight versus Moon Knight. Just when you thought this couldn’t get any crazier…

Suicide Squad Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – I have never read anything Suicide Squad before, so with the movie coming this week, what better place to start?

 

Brett

Top Pick: March Book 3 (IDW Publishing/Top Shelf) – The third and final volume of Congressman Lewis’ recounting of his time during the Civil Rights movement. The third volume is powerful on its own, but when combined with the first two volumes you have a trilogy that’s a modern classic.

Jeff Steinberg: Champion of Earth #1 (Oni Press) – This first issue had me laughing and this series looks like it’s going to be completely out there and enough dick jokes to make the 8 year old version of me giggling.

Kill or Be Killed #1 (Image Comics) – Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser, that alone is the reason I’m excited for this one.

Lady Killer 2 #1 (Dark Horse) – Joelle Jones is back with a new volume about our favorite housewife/killer Josie Schuller. The first issue is absolutely fantastic and has me excited to see what else is to come.

Sheriff of Babylon #9 (Vertigo) – The best comic on the stand right now. This issue as the various threads coming together and it’s done so in a way that’ll have you amped up to see what comes next and yelling at the comic in frustration of the disaster that is the US’s occupation of Iraq.

Image Announces New Image Firsts

Image Comics has announced the release of three new Image Firsts editions—printings of the first issues of popular series that only cost $1. Perfect for readers interested in trying out a variety of new series without feeling the effects on their wallet, these new releases will be available in stores on July 13th, just in time San Diego Comic-Con.

The three new titles are Paper Girls #1 by Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang, Monstress #1 by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda, and I Hate Fairyland #1 by Skottie Young.

The final order cutoff deadline for retailers on all three is Monday, June 20th.

PAPER GIRLS #1

In the early hours after Halloween of 1988, four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls uncover the most important story of all time. Stand By Me meets War of the Worlds in this mysterious young adult adventure, starting with a spectacular double-sized first issue. The Image Firsts: Paper Girls #1 edition is available with Diamond Code MAY168030.

MONSTRESS #1

Steampunk meets Kaiju in this original fantasy epic for mature readers, as young Maika risks everything to control her psychic link with a monster of tremendous power, placing her in the center of a devastating war between human and otherworldly forces. The adventure begins in a spectacular triple-sized first issue, with sixty-six pages of story. The Image Firsts: Monstress #1 edition is available with Diamond Code MAY168031.

I HATE FAIRYLAND #1

The Adventure Time/Alice in Wonderland-style epic that smashes its cute little face against Tank Girl/Deadpool-esque violent madness has arrived. In an adventure that ain’t for the little kiddies, (unless you have super cool parents, then whatever), you’ll meet Gert—a six year old girl who has been stuck in the magical world of Fairyland for thirty years and will hack and slash her way through anything to find her way back home. Join Gert and her giant battle-axe on a delightfully blood soaked journey to see who will survive the girl who hates Fairyland. The Image Firsts: I Hate Fairyland #1 edition is available with Diamond Code MAY168029.

 

Paper Girls Goes Back to Print

Paper Girls created by writer Brian K. Vaughan and artist Cliff Chiang launched to critical-acclaim and immediate fan-following. In order keep up with increasing customer demand, Paper Girls #6 is being fast-tracked to a second printing.

Paper Girls #6 marks the beginning of the second arc for the series and returns to the story with a bold new direction, as Erin, Mac, and Tiffany find themselves launched from 1988 to a distant and terrifying future.

In Paper Girls  #7, Erin and her fellow deliverers uncover shocking truths about their own fates.

Paper Girls is set in the early hours after Halloween of 1988 when four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls uncover the most important story of all time. Suburban drama and otherworldly mysteries collide in this smash-hit series about nostalgia, first jobs, and the last days of childhood.

Paper Girls #6, second printing (Diamond Code APR168860) will arrive in stores on Wednesday, July 6th. Final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, June 13th.

Paper Girls  #7 (Diamond Code MAY160649) will arrive in stores on Wednesday, July 6th as well. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is also Monday, June 13th.

Paper Girls, Vol. 1 (ISBN 978-1632156747) is available now. It can be ordered by retailers from Diamond Book Distributors with Diamond code JAN160645. It can be preordered now on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Indiebound.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Civil_War_II_1_CoverWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Paul

Top Pick: Civil War II #1 (Marvel) – Here it is!  The start of the next event that is going to split the hero community in half…again.  You would think they would have learned after the first throw down.  This time though, it isn’t registration that is looking to control the heroes and their actions; now we have an Inhuman who can see into the future…and there are those who think this can be used to prevent disastrous events.  Is the future written in stone?  Can you hold someone responsible for something they may do?  That’s what the Marvel Universe will be exploring and you can bet it’s going to get ugly.

A-Force #6 (Marvel) – It’s A-Force vs. Nico (under the control of the Countess).  Medusa has been skeptical about Nico’s powers from the start of this team…it’s going to be very interesting for her to find out first hand just what Sister Grimm can do.  I just hope A-Force survive the ordeal.  I’ve been a fan of this book since the start, and I am always excited when a new issue comes out.  It’s a great read with laughs, sass and action; who can ask for anything more?

Green Arrow: Rebirth #1 (DC) – Yeah yeah, here’s a DC title on my list.  I’ll be honest, I’m interested in this to see Black Canary and Green Arrow together again.  Yes, I know that is just the gimmick (as mentioned in previous articles) DC is using to get readers into this Rebirth.  Me, not being a regular to the DC universe, think this is a great time to jump in and see if it’s enough to make me consider making room for DC AND Marvel in my life.

Old Man Logan #7 (Marvel) – Logan is just looking to lay low and figure out his place in this new world he’s found himself in.  Too bad Lady Deathstrike and her Reavers have other plans.  I am really looking forward to seeing this showdown; this isn’t the Logan that Deathstrike is expecting to find…she may just get more then she bargained for.

 

Javier

Top Pick: Batman: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – It’s our first look with Tom King who is taking over writing duties from Scott Snyder.

Deadly Class #21 (Image Comics) – Summer finally is here, as freshmen finals end; but another freshman fails to make it to sophomore year.  Rick Remender’s depressive, but action filled, take on prep school assassination madness,continues to entertain.

The Goddamned #4 (Image Comics) – Another biblical inspired story. It focuses on a seemingly immortal and wandering Cain, after the fall; set in the period of the mythical Nephilim prior to the flood. Jason Aaron weaves yet another must-read grim proto-human story.

Saints #9 (Image Comics) – Another excellent maxi-series reaches its conclusion. The holy war (or unholy, depending on your opinion) ends, when the young and hipster Saints crew come face to face with the Archangel Michael and God.

Unfollow #8 (DC Vertigo) – This dark spin on social media continues, with more of the 140 dropping off, but a new follower enters the fray.

 

Anthony

Top Pick: Birth of Kitaro GN (Drawn & Quarterly) – Kitaro is one of the most beloved characters in Japan. Created by Shigeru Mizuki, the titular character encounters a wide variety of yokai (creatures from Japanese folklore) in stories that appeal to both those interested in Japanese folklore and mythology as well as funny, great, entertaining manga. Finally, the West gets the first of a planned series of volumes with a translation by Zack Davisson.

Civil War II #1 (Marvel) – Say what you will about events for Marvel, this one looks to be the first event to make an impact in the post Secret Wars universe. Issue #0 didn’t really set many things up but did show a not too pleasant looking future. It will be refreshing to hopefully continue to have the series’ perspective from the same characters from the introductory issue.

Moon Knight #3 (Marvel) – Jeff Lemire, Greg Smallwood and Jordie Bellaire have been hypnotizing the reader thus far with a mysterious, brooding tale of Marc Spector combatting both demons (or Gods) both in his mind and in the physical world. This series has picked up the reigns from the last run of ‘Moon Knight’ and continues to prove that the character is one of the most intriguing in the Marvel universe.

Paper Girls #6 (Image Comics) – The first five issues were a fun callback to the action/adventure movies of the 1980s. It will be interesting to see what is in store with this title as the time frame switches to 2016. Plus, it is pretty hard to pass on Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang’s gorgeous visuals and one of the best colourists in the game with Matt Wilson.

The Revisionist #1 (Aftershock Comics) – Frank J. Barbiere is back with another intriguing title that is sure to bring the wit and fun nature of past titles like ‘Five Ghosts’, alongside artist Garry Brown and colourist Lauren Affe. All it takes, beyond the creative team, to be sold on this book are three words: time-travelling assassin. Plus, Aftershock has been releasing some really fresh, outside the box kinds of titles.

 

Alex

Top Pick: 4001 A.D. #2 (Valiant) – I’m not going to lie – I’ve already read this. It’s my top pick because I can’t wait to see the artwork in printed form. So excited.

The Goddamned #4 (Image Comics) – It feels like an age since the third issue came out, and I hadn’t realized how much I missed reading Jason Aaron’s take on the time before Noah needed his Arc. Brutal, bloody, and probably offensive. I love it.

Moon Knight #3 (Marvel) – To be honest, this isn’t the best Moon Knight series I’ve ever read, but it’s far from the worst. With each issue getting a little better, I’m hopeful for the rest of the series.

Old Man Logan #7 (Marvel) – After the anticlimactic first arc, the old man’s second story arc is, so far at least, feeling a hell of a lot better. What’s more classic Wolvie feeling than having him face off against the Reavers?

Will Eisner’s The Spirit #11 (Dynamite Entertainment) – Speaking of things I love… this is arguably the best series being published right now featuring an urban based vigilante.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Red Virgin & the Vision of Utopia (Dark Horse) – A portrait of revolutionary feminist Louise Michel, who took up arms against a French regime that executed thousands. Deported to a penal colony, Michel joined the cause of the indigenous population against colonial oppression. Is there a more “me” graphic novel? Been reading it, and it’s really interesting.

Chum #2 (Comixtribe) – The first issue was a great mix of surfing and noir. Take Jaws, minus the giant shark, and add a crime story to it, and you have this comic. So good and looking forward to seeing where it all goes.

Hellboy in Hell #10 (Dark Horse) – This is it. Hellboy transforms into what he was always meant to be as Mike Mignola wraps up this series.

Rough Riders #3 (Aftershock Comics) – FDR and his gang of historical figures are heading to Cuba. There’s something really fun about this alternate history comic that dives deep into real history to get things right. It’s entertaining and will get you to do some research too.

Superman: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – I loved the Superman: Lois and Clark miniseries and to see where and how this Superman fits into the Rebirth universe is going to be very interesting. That miniseries was filled with action, but also a lot of positivity. This issue serves as a fantastic end cap to that bridging the cap between that and what’s to come.

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 6/2/16

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Alex

johnnyred4Johnny Red #4 (Titan)** I love this series; it’s a fantastic WWII era story about a British fighter ace fighting for Russia (but do the Russian brass really want him there?) that tugs on my fondness for war comics, my respect for those who fought in the war, and my love of high quality stories. That this just happens to be one of my top two comics released this week, is just a happy accident. While this isn’t an ideal point for new readers to jump on – what with it being right in the middle of the series – it’s worth hunting the back issues down. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Surviving Megalopolis #2 (Dark Horse) I was surprised by this series. It has a slight flavour of Irredeemable but with enough of an original twist to the “Justice League’s gone bad” that it should pique your interest, because it’s well worth reading. Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Cry Havoc #1 (Image) I finally got around to reading a couple of the last week or two’s comics, and this was fantastic. I should have read this when it came out, because the mix of the supernatural, an awesome lead character (or two) and some brilliant art make this a must read. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

europa 3Batman: Europa #2, #3 & #4 (DC)* I found the differences in the art style issue to issue jarring – at first. Then I realized that whether intentional or not (and I think it was) it absolutely makes sense given the nature of the story. I devoured the three remaining issues that I hadn’t picked up in less than an hour. Truly great stuff. Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Amazing Forest #1 & #2 (IDW) Are a pair of fantastic anthology comics. You don’t need to read the first to enjoy the second, but both issues have some brilliant short comic stories within them that are – at times – out of this world, but are all fantastically entertaining. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Doc Savage: The Spider’s Web #3 (Dynamite) Meh. It’s okay, but just doesn’t do it for me. Overall: 6 Recommendation: Read, maybe?

The Precinct #3 (Dynamite) I wasn’t that impressed with the last issue, but this one was a lot better. It definitely drew my interest much better, and felt like a much more complete installment in this story. Plus, the steam punk aspects are fantastically understated. This comic would be just as good without them, but why would you want that? Overall: 8 Recommendation: Read

Cage Hero #4 (Dynamite) While I have enjoyed the issues so far, I’ve enjoyed them as I would the Sharknado movies; Cage Hero is good because it knows exactly what it is, and it celebrates it with every cheesy bit of dialogue, every been-there-read-that scene. The thing is, it does those things almost well enough to be worth buying, but does fall a lttle short. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Buy

 

Mr H

Spider-Man_1_CoverSpider-Man #1 (Marvel Comics)* Whooo Miles is finally here in the Prime Universe! This issue was great. I didn’t enjoy an issue like this from Bendis since his first story arc on Ultimate Spider-Man. Miles is having trouble balancing hero life and school responsibilities. What makes the issue though is when he swings into action. Spidey takes it right to Blackheart and even wields Captain America’s shield! Just a whole lot of fun and it ends with a great cliffhanger. Bendis and Pichelli have another win. I already can’t wait for the next issue. Overall: 9 

 

Patrick

Vision #4 (Marvel) * – This is the best book about robots that needlessly stars robots. There’s really nothing about the book so far that would prevent an editor from taking out the fact that it stars androids and replacing them with a racial or religious minority family and telling the same story. If the point of the story was to humanize the Vision, why is it being injected with this daytime soap plot? I was so glad they acknowledged the Vision had previously been married to the Scarlet Witch because the whole book began to feel like it took place in a pocket universe. Tom King is amazing and I keep reading to see what he’ll do. Gabriel Hernandez Walta is a tremendous talent and I’ll often by a book just because I enjoy his dark tones and the way he captures human emotion. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy this book. The characters just haven’t meshed with the story yet. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

PaperGirls_05-1Paper Girls #5 (Image)– It saddens me to only be writing a shortened review but I don’t want to spend the time being negative about one of my favorite writers in a luscious and gorgeous book. The issue mostly resolves its own tangential distraction this issue and writes two characters who we didn’t really know super well in the first place. I have re-read every issue since it came out and I still have to go back and figure out the names of the four central characters. I like that this issue ends with them literally somewhere else (as it’s beginning to feel like they have just been bouncing back and forth between the same locations accomplishing nothing). The story… I like to start with a summary of what’s happened. You can usually tell how good a book is by how much the summary changes from review to review. I’d be writing the same summary if I did a full review.  Overall: 7 Recomendation: Read

Detective Comics #49 (DC)*– The best part of Jim Gordon-Batman is still just watching him roll with the punches and really do his best. Bruce Wayne-Batman is always treated like a dark god that somehow stands toe-to-toe with everyone from Darkseid to street-pushers. Jim Gordon’s Batman wakes up the whole neighborhood with a blimp spotlight trying to conduct an investigation and fails to get anyone turn it off before just breaking it. I also like some of the darker imagery (for a mainstream DC comic) which helps me balance out the idea that all Batman and his team are doing is watching statues. Seriously, someone’s probably being assaulted in the alleyway adjacent to one of the statues, Batman. Can you think big-picture for a second? Overall: 5.5 Recommendation: Pass

Spider-Man #1 (Marvel)* – This book follows Miles Morales integration into the mainstream universe following the events of Crisis on Infinite Earths (right? I didn’t read Secret Wars, I already had the trade for the original Crisis so I just read that). Honestly, Miles Morales is far more like Peter Parker than Peter Parker has been for a very long time which helps me to understand why this issue ended with me thinking, “Oh, yeah… it’s that red-and-blue rip-off Spider-Man! Oh, red-suit Venom!” Bendis’s best work comes when he is not writing every book with the Marvel logo printed on it (so, essentially everything from before ten years ago), however Sara Pichelli and Justin Ponsor own Miles Morales as far as I’m concerned. There’s something about Pichelli’s angles that make the formerly ultimate Spider-Man so dynamic. I’ve seen static shots of Spider-Man web-slinging for years, but Pichelli’s renditions always make me stop and admire her work. Overall: 6.5 Recommedation: Read

Uncanny X-Men #3 (Marvel)– I miss this book when it was drawn by Rob Liefeld. I miss this book when it was drawn by Mike Allred. I miss this when it was written by Rick Remender. Am I making my point? I struggle with subtly. My point is that it’s sacrilege to have the Uncanny X-Men title be a clone of one of its own spin-off. (I also struggle with perspective.) Overall: 6 Recommendation: Pass

 

Paul

vision 4Vision #4 (Marvel) * Still, in my opinion, the best All New All Different title that I’m reading. Vision still has no idea what his wife has been up to and what she’s hiding; and Virgina comes face to face with her blackmailer and the meeting does not end well. I could feel for her in this issue, and her situation; feeling helpless and things spinning out of control, thanks to King’s writing and complemented beautifully by Walta’s dark tones in the art. I look forward to this title every month and you should be too. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy 

Uncanny Avengers #5 (Marvel)* Well here’s a surprise…I didn’t hate it! Rogue, Deadpool, Human Torch and (briefly) Cable are on the hunt for the Red Skull, or more accurately, Professor X’s brain in Red Skull’s head. They do some good cop/bad cop and get a lead on where to find him. The trio (no Cable) break into where they are told they will find Skull and instead find none other then Gambit. He and Rogue have a brief litte reunion and Red Skull slips right past the team…literally. This isn’t a bad stand alone issue coming off the end of the debut story arc. The action was good and I’m sure the search for Red Skull will be explored in more depth as the series goes on.  Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read 

 

Ryan C

Providence #7 (Avatar Press) *: The best book on the stands by a country effing mile keeps getting better as hapless protagonist Robert Black finds himself thrown into the Lovecraftian underbelly of America’s physical and psychological horror-show and constructs the most bizarrely effective means for rationalizing his experiences, and coming out the other side more cheerful and optimistic, that I’ve ever witnessed. Thrown in themes of class division, loneliness and isolation, and the terrible burden of keeping secrets and this is “Pickman’s Model” as you’ve never seen it before. Alan Moore’s most compelling “major work” in decades combined with Jacen Burrows’ flat-out breathtaking art makes me feel genuine pity for the folks out there who aren’t reading this. Much as I love any number of current comics series, the simple fact is that right now there is “Providence” — and there is everything else.  Overall: 10. Recommendation: Buy

unfollow 4Unfollow #4 (DC/Vertigo) *: Rob Williams’ fiendishly clever social-darwinism-disguised-as-charity premise goes from “gettign warmer” to “heating up” with this issue, and I can only imagine what “boiling” is going to be like. Somebody we’ve gotten to “know” a bit dies in this issue, and it appears we’re going to get a murder mystery added to the mix here, as well. On art, Mike Dowling seems to be stepping out of his self-imposed Frank Quitely shadow and developing his own, more organic style, so that’s good to see, as well.  Overall: 7.5. Recommendation: Buy

The Sheriff Of Babylon #3 (DC/Vertigo) *: Another strong and compelling series of wrinkles is added to our layer-cake of corruption and rat-fuckery in Occupied Iraq — and speaking of fucking it turns out that two of our protagonists are doing just that — but while Mitch Gerads’ art continues to impress with its grittiness and authenticity, the script by “ex-” CIA operative Tom King (yeah, lots of folks quit the CIA and go into low-paying freelance writing) is taking on a more blatant neo-colonialist tone that seems very much of a piece with the right-wing themes on display in the author’s other high-profile works such as “Grayson” and “The Omega Men.” King hasn’t earned the right to be compared to Ditko, but both are examples of people in comics whose work I admire despite finding their politics anywhere from questionable to downright nauseating. If there’s any doubt in your mind as to where King stands, I’ve seen him say that he’s “proud” of the work he did in Iraq. I’m sure his “former” bosses are proud of the work he’s doing, supposedly of his own volition, to spread their worldview in our entertainment media. Troubling material to say the least, but I can’t deny its quality.  Overall: 7. Recommendation: Buy, but know the writer is probably supplementing his income with a check from Langley.

Swamp Thing #2 (DC)*: Len Wein and Kelly Jones’ “back-to-basics” take on the character continues to showcase both the best and worst aspects of 1970s horror comics — the best being Wein’s deliriously OTT purple prose and Jones’ heartfelt stylistic homage to the art of Bernie Wrightson, the worst being the lame-ass, easily-resolved plot (that could, I suppose, work as a one-or two-parter in a monthly ongoing, but feels downright bizarre in a six-issue mini-series) and the shoe-horning in of guest stars for no apparent reason. The Phantom Stranger I could see, sure — but what possible point does plugging Shade from “Starman” into this story serve? Nice little epilogue/cliffhanger at the end, though, and I’m still loving the ride for the most part. Overall: 7. Recommendation: Buy.

 

Shean

Shaft: Imitation of Life#1 (Dynamite Ent.): The adventures of John Shaft continues in this new miniseries as we catchup with him right before he becomes a successful private investigator. All it took was one case of a mobster’s missing daughter to propel his business. As he enjoys the fruit of his success, David Walker proves that it has not changed the man, as he takes on another missing person’s case , finding trouble at every turn. Altogether, a strong first issue to an already entertaining series. Overall:9.4 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write.

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Review: Paper Girls #5

papergirls05-cover-webPaper Girls #5 dropped on Wednesday, and while certain things are becoming clearer, my overall interest is starting to wane. I think I’ve held out hope longer than other folks, based on some of the reviews I’ve read of previous issues, but I’ve finally caught up with the “Get on with it, already” chorus.

*Spoilers ahead*

We pick up in a ‘Whenhouse’ (time travel humor, ha!) where Heck and Naldo are treating Erin’s gunshot wound with a swarm of stolen insects. As it happens, Heck and Naldo are scavengers, because sometimes “yesterday’s trash is tomorrow’s treasure!” They explain how they have to utilize a spaceship in order to time travel since the Earth is always moving, and that they’re working to get Erin fixed up and back to her friends. Erin dismisses her fellow paper girls as “just some people that shot me” so clearly she’s not feeling too kindly towards a reunion. Heck and Naldo become increasingly endearing in this scene but the elders attempt to interfere with their ship and things don’t exactly go well for them, so don’t get too attached.

Speaking of Earth, back on Erin’s home planet Tiffany, Mac, and KJ are still standing in the woods where we last saw them. KJ has a “Eureka!” moment where she remembers the spaceship they discovered in the basement in Issue #1 and pieces together that they may be one and the same. As they decide to head back that way they’re intercepted by Cardinal, the female warrior fighting for the elders. Tiffany whips out the gun, which readers know from the previous issue in unloaded, and effectively disarms Cardinal with an empty threat to shoot her pterodactyl. It’s a clever bluff, and another great display of artist Cliff Chiang’s knack for drawing sneers. Unfortunately for Cardinal, Mac is the one to take away her weapon and winds up inadvertently using it against her, much the same way she accidentally shot Erin. The girls take off and when Cardinal regains her senses she places a call to Grandfather, reporting that the girls are now armed and should be tried as adults. Grandfather decides to step in and take care of business himself.

As Erin starts to come to her senses back on the spaceship we see that Heck and Naldo aren’t doing too well, and they appear to die just before landing. Erin makes her grand entrance, emerging out of the spacepod and into the basement where the other girls are waiting for her. Her earlier bitterness towards them has worn off, and apologies are exchanged as Grandfather calls to them from outside. As he tries to explain that Heck and Naldo were juvenile delinquents and that the girls have unfortunately waded into the middle of a complicated generational conflict, the house folds in on itself, transporting the girls into the future where they are met with a very familiar face.

One of the things I like about the series so far is that neither the elders nor Heck and Naldo seem to qualify as legit bad guys outside of their own conflict. Both sides seem to have a genuine interest in preventing harm to the girls, which I’m guessing means the girls will ultimately lead to some form of peacemaking between the generational factions. I also like the little snarky exchanges that pepper the Paper Girls world with humor and add personality to the characters, but I’d really like to know what pre-existing bonds KJ, Mac, and Tiffany share. It also would have been more interesting to this particular reader if Erin had been holding more of an active grudge upon reuniting with them.

While there’s a lot of action through these first five issues, I don’t actually feel like there’s a whole lot at stake while reading it. Although characters I’ve liked have died, I didn’t get to spend enough time with them to really feel the loss. The characters that are still plugging along are entertaining and interesting, but not what I’d call solid. Each issue is a fun read, but at this point I’d expect a deeper emotional investment which has yet to come to fruition.

Story: Brian K. Vaughan Art: Cliff Chiang, Matt Wilson
Story: 6 Art: 9 Overall: 6 Recommendation: Buy in Trade

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

Tetris_BoxshotIt was new comic book day yesterday. What’d folks get? What’d you enjoy? What was a stinker? Sound off in the comments!

Up first though, here’s some news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Comics Alliance – In Defense Of T-Shirt Superman: Why ‘Action Comics’ And ‘Superman’ Are Seriously Great Right Now – Thoughts? Agree? Disagree?

The Beat – Coca Cola and Marvel are teaming up for the Super Bowl – Not too surprising.

Kotaku – Peek Inside the New Graphic Novel That Tells The Origin Story Of Tetris – This sounds cool.

Humanosphere – Graphic novel depicts life as an aid worker in Iraq – Again, awesome to see this.

The Guardian – African Avengers: the comic book creators shaking up superhero genre – Lots of comics to check out!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – Batman: Europa #1-4

Talking Comics – Bizarro TPB

Talking Comics – Kennel Block Blues #1

Talking Comics – Mirror #1

Comic Vine – Nailbiter #20

Talking Comics – Paper Girls Vol. 1

Comic Vine – Spider-Man #1

Newsarama – Spider-Man #1\

Comic Vine – Star Wars: Obi-Wan and Anakin #2

Comic Vine – Uncanny Avengers #5

Comic Vine – Unfollow #4

Talking Comics – Voracious #1

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

JR4_Cover B by Keith BurnsWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Mr. H

Top Pick: Spider-Man #1 (Marvel Comics) – Finally Miles Morales in his own stand alone book in the Prime Universe! Very excited for this one. With Peter Parker as his mentor will the old Parker luck rub off on our hero? Or will he reach new heights? Maybe an internship at Parker Industries awaits? Come and see Web heads!

Action Comics #49 (DC Comics) – Did Clark survive his Kryptonite overdose? Can he stand up to Vandal Savage? Find out here…

Green Lantern #49 (DC Comics) – The race to 50 is on.. is Hal ready for the coming of Parallax?

We are Robin #8 (DC Comics) – More like we are Joker this month. Let’s see how the social media treats a gang of villains rather than the fledgling heroes. One question needs to be asked “Why so serious?”

 

Ashley

Top Pick: The Wicked + The Divine Vol. 3 (Image Comics) – Initially thought to be a low arc due to the use of guest artists, the “Commercial Suicide” arc ended up being a brilliant and heartbreaking arc that focused more on the other characters we don’t get to see as much of in the bigger scheme of WicDiv. Exploring issues of fate, misogyny, pop stardom, cultural appropriation, and death, this experimental arc demonstrated WicDiv’s staying power.

Batgirl #48 (DC Comics) – There’s only two things I know about this issue. One, Black Canary is back in town and teaming up with Babs. Two, BABS TARR FINALLY GOT TO DRAW A LUCHA BATGIRL. Kalisto is US Champion, Lucha Underground is back, and there is an actual Luchador Batgirl costume now. What a time to be alive.

Captain Marvel #2 (Marvel) – Exhale everyone, Carol is just as lively and hardheaded as ever in the hands of Butters and Fazekas. Not to mention those abs by Anka. While it hasn’t made me cry yet, the series has me intrigued with its new use of Alpha Flight and the mystery reveal of the skeleton crew from the last issue. It’ll be interesting to see just what is in store for Carol at this “desk job.”

Pretty Deadly #8 (Image Comics) – I have a special place in my heart for the Deconnick/Ríos/Bellaire supernatural western, but this arc has been breathtaking both in story and art. Now, we finally get to meet the Reaper of War and maybe figure out just what his deal is.

Rocket Raccoon and Groot #2 (Marvel) – The first run at the Rocket Raccoon comic was an absolutely uproarious affair that made it one of my favorite Marvel titles. Skottie Young and Filipe Andrade seem to be taking a slightly different route this time with Rocket not knowing who he is after his death in Secret Wars, but the humor still seems to be there.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Johnny Red #4 (Titan Comics) – I love this series, and I’ve been counting down the days to each issues release. It is a fantastic World War II era story that highlights the struggles faced in Russia around that time, coupled with some truly stunning visual techniques.

Howard The Duck #4 (Marvel) – If not for Old Man Logan, this would be the only Marvel book I’d be reading, and that’s thanks in a large part to writer Chip Zdarsky’s occasional digs at Marvel’s reboots and events over the past year or so. I’ve been told that this series doesn’t hold up quite as well as Steve Gerber’s first volume, but if you don’t have that basis for comparison (and I don’t, yet) then the current run on Howard The Duck will be highly enjoyable.

Klaus #3 (BOOM! Studios) – Talking about visually stunning, Klaus is fantastic. It may be billed as an origin story for Santa (and it is), but this comic is so much more than that. There’s a warmth here that you really must experience.

Swamp Thing #2 (DC Comics) – When I was initially getting this list ready, it never occurred to me that Swamp Thing #2 would be one of my top five picks this week. But then I saw the comic listed on Previews website a coming out and I got unreasonably excited to read it after I remembered the slower paced, modern feeling with almost classical twist of the first issue. Who’da known?

X-O Manowar #44 (Valiant) – I wasn’t, honestly, all that impressed with the last issue of this series. It wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t as good as it has been lately. Hopefully it was a slower start to the new arc and not something indicative of a trend. This issue will go a long way to assuaging my fears, so I’m eager to get a chance to read it.

 

Madison

Top Pick: Pretty Deadly #8 (Image) – Pretty Deadly is one of my forever favorites. Emma Ríos’s art is otherworldly, and I’m excited to see where the story goes as they continue to develop the new arc.

Batgirl #48 (DC Comics) – This week’s Batgirl looks especially promising–it has both the return of Black Canary and one of the cutest covers possibly ever.

Paper Girls #5 (Image Comics) – Paper Girls might take an issue or two to really get into–the action starts quickly and doesn’t stop when four girls are attacked on their paper route. However, as with most Brian K. Vaughan stories, it’s worth seeing through.

Shutter #18 (Image Comics) – Shutter is a great subversion of the adventure genre, but the real draw for me was the art. If you haven’t read Shutter, you might recognize Leila Del Duca from the recent and absolutely gorgeous Morrigan-centric issue of The Wicked + The Divine.

 

Paul

Top Pick: A-Force #2 (Marvel) – A-Force is assembling and I’m excited to see them together again.  True, it won’t be no holds barred like it was in Secret Wars, but it looks like it’s going to be a fun ride; and I’m really enjoying seeing things from Singularity’s point of view; she wants her friends back and is doing what she can to find them, even with a big bad energy monster on her tail.  To paraphrase Iron Man, she’s bringing the party to them!

Scarlet Witch #3 (Marvel) – I’m not all in on this title going into the third issue.  Yes, I love Wanda.  She is one of my favourite characters.  The debut issue was alright, and issue two was less than that.  So why is this on my pick of the week list?  I’m holding out hope this title picks up, and I do have a soft spot for Wanda.  There are some good ideas here, and I hope it gets a little more interesting.

Uncanny Avengers #5 (Marvel) – It’s no secret to many how I feel about this title.  So why is it on my list?  Gambit is on the cover.  That is the only reason I’m looking forward to it this week.  I’m curious to see what role he’ll play with the team and with Rogue.

The Vision #4 (Marvel) – Still the surprise hit, for me, from the All New All Different launch.  Vision just wanted to live a life with a wife and kids, what could possibly go wrong?  The reader is given very grim hints that plenty goes wrong.  Not to mention Vision’s own wife and kids have things happen to them, which they keep from him, that show us that they are a lot more like us then people would think.  It’s a great read that I highly recommend.

 

Javier

Top Pick: Sheriff of Babylon #3 (DC Comics/Vertigo) – Tom King has had the Midas Touch, as anything he writes turns into liquid comic book gold.  This militaristic detective story is a solid read.

Bad Moon Rising #5 (451 Media) – The end is near. Only two issues left in the series. It’s Werewolves versus full automatics and Silver Bullets. I got five to one odds on the Biker Werewolves.

Paper Girls #5 (Image Comics) – I’m just waiting for one of the Paper Girls to be like, “I want my two dollars!!” They deserve a little more, after all that they’ve been through so far.

Unfollow #4 (DC Comics/Vertigo) – Bruce Lee’s Game of Death meets Social Media as the Chosen gather together to thin the herd. Or will they rise above their human faults?

The Walking Dead #151 (Image Comics) – Who cares that  I am front running on the Zombie genre.  A real war is coming as General Rick builds his army.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Johnny Red #4 (Titan Comics) – This seriously has gotten better and better with each issue and has been filled with action and a lot of touching interaction of the characters. Garth Ennis is knocking it out of the park with this series focused on an English pilot leading a Russian squad in WWII. The story is good, and the art is even more amazing. Some of the two page spreads are just jaw dropping.

Last Man: The Chase (First Second) – Such a fun graphic novel series. I’m excited to see more and more as the world is expanded upon and we learn what’s going on. It’s a hell of a mystery so far with small clues that make you scratch your head.

Nailbiter #20 (Image Comics) – One of my favorite series. This arc has some of the cast in Georgia trying to catch a serial killer who may have ties to Buckaroo. Just a fun comic about serial killers.

Princeless: Raven Pirate Princess #5 (Action Lab Entertainment) – Somehow this spinoff series has surpassed the original it came out of. Raven is one of my favorite new characters of the past few years and the fun flows off the page. Every issue has delivered.

Tomboy #3 (Action Lab: Danger Zone)Princeless for adults? This series has a teenage girl turned vigilante. The first two issues blew me away and I can’t wait to read the third. This is one that was one of my favorite debuts of 2015.

Review: Paper Girls #4

Paper Girls #4Paper Girls Issue 4 picks up on a phone ringing. An older man in a Public Enemy t-shirt answers, and while he appear to be a normal guy in an ordinary bed in an unremarkable bedroom, the functioning eyeball in the center of his phone’s rotary dial points to the contrary. This is confirmed when we meet the woman on the other end of the line, a warrior who identifies herself as Cardinal and reports the discovery of her fallen peer Alister (aka “Space Idris” in my previous review) who met his demise at the end of Issue 3. Public Enemy instructs her to “call down an Editrix” which, judging by her stunned reaction, doesn’t bode well for our titular paper girls who were last seen in the company of the opposing forces. In defense of his decision he simply states “Can’t risk another C-Day.” As per usual we have new (throw away?) characters and new questions, but ultimately little headway in terms of development for our titular paper girls.

I don’t typically read comics issue-by-issue so I’ve tried not to be too judgmental of the pacing thus far, but at this point in the series I’m becoming less interested in piecing together the greater mystery of what’s happening in the Paper Girls universe and increasingly eager to see the girls develop as characters in a more fulfilling way. So far the majority of the character focus has been on Erin, we’ve gotten a brief glimpse of Mac’s life outside the group, and this issue gave us a peek at Tiffany, but not much of one. I’m assuming KJ will be next – fingers crossed that her background involves actively using her field hockey stick as a weapon instead of for sport.

(Spoilers ahead)

When we catch up with Mac, Tiffany, and KJ they are navigating the sewers with their deformed teenage companions from the future, one of them carrying Erin’s semi-conscious body, en route to somehow heal her gunshot wound. They identify themselves as Heck and Naldo, and Heck indicates that the “old-timers” like Alister killed his boyfriend, which evokes an “Ew!” of disgust from Mac.

Mac’s open revulsion at Heck’s sexuality harkens back to a similar homophobic display in the first issue and she is again kept in check by her friends. A few months ago Elana and I privately discussed some of the criticisms of Mac’s use of a homophobic slur in the pilot, a moment that seemed natural to me because a) It’s 1988. Heck shrugs off her attitude because the girls are “from an effed-up time” and as a child of the 80’s myself I remember that it was a pivotal era, not only in my own development but in our cultural development, in terms of sussing out what words are and are not acceptable insults. Adolescence could also be accurately described as “an effed-up time” and Mac is a 12 year-old girl who’s still learning, and b) her friends correct her by openly disapproving of her prejudice – it’s not an action that’s defended to the readers, rather it’s a character flaw on display. Elana rightly pointed out that it’s not necessary to include a homophobic slur to bolster historical accuracy or illustrate that homophobia is wrong, but that it could be an important piece of character development if it proves that Mac herself is queer. It’s an interesting, complicated point of consideration, and we both hope it gets explored in a meaningful way as the series goes on.

The sewer crew are soon intercepted by the aforementioned Editrix, a hovering, multi-eyed tentacle monster, which grabs Tiffany and throttles her into unconsciousness. Everything literally goes sideways in this moment as the pages flip and readers have to turn the book to keep reading, watching Tiffany as she relives a childhood spent obsessively playing the video game Breakout. When KJ comes to her rescue and she regains her senses she describes the experience as hell. I suspect this serves more as a metaphor for the situation they’re in – the futile, repetitive nature of war, perhaps the inevitability of another “C-Day”, whatever that will prove to be – and less as insight into Tiffany as an individual. I do wonder what significance there may be in her choice of game – are we on the verge of a narrative breakout? Did everything go sideways because shit’s going to hit the fan and things will start coming together in Issue 5? I can hope!

When they finally emerge from the sewers Mac voices her distrust in Heck and Naldo, and is again reprimanded by KJ when she refers to them as “perverts.” But Mac argues “…whether those two are into dudes or not, they’re still teenage boys. Even my brother says they can’t be trusted and he is one” and I still share her skepticism, at least for now.

Again, I like to think if I were reading a collected volume I’d be more satisfied with the way things are being laid out and I think ultimately a binge-reading would be great fun (it’s why I always recommend buying this title in trade), but at the rate we’re going I’m ready for some solid movement instead of the Lost-esque constant mystery-building. That’s not to say I’m not enjoying the ride, however; this issue had some fun moments and an added visual punch with more greens and oranges than we’ve seen previously. I’m definitely curious to know more about the dude in the Public Enemy shirt, known formally as Grandfather, and I love that a group of tweens are the neutral party in a war between teenagers and adults. Overall I’m still on board, and looking forward to what’s up next.

Story: Brian K. Vaughan Art: Cliff Chiang
Story: 7 Art: 9 Overall: 7.5 Recommend: Buy in trade

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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