Tag Archives: neal adams

Neal Adams, David Finch, Tom King, and Lee Weeks Come to Baltimore Comic Con

Baltimore Comic-Con returns to the Baltimore Convention Center on October 18-20, 2019. The Baltimore Comic-Con will feature some of Batman’s most prolific creators in 2019, including Neal Adams, David Finch, Tom King, and Lee Weeks.

Neal Adams‘ work on such DC Comics characters as Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, and Green Arrow redefined an era of comics, bringing a photorealistic feel to the pages of their respective books. In the late-’60s, while freelancing for DC Comics, Adams also began working at Marvel Comics on X-Men with Roy Thomas. He continued to work for DC and Marvel throughout the late-’60s and ’70s, working on The AvengersDetective Comics, and Green Lantern/Green Arrow. More recently, Adams did a Deadman limited series and the 7-issue second volume of Batman: Odyssey for DC Comics, and handled art duties on Marvel Comics’ First X-Men and DC’s Harley’s Little Black Book, parodying his famous Superman vs. Muhammad Ali comic from the 1970s.

Joining the convention from Canada, Eisner Award-winning  David Finch received recognition for his early work at Top Cow Productions on titles such as CyberforceAscension, and Aphrodite IX. He then went on to spend a number of years at Marvel Comics, working on blockbuster titles including Ultimate X-MenAvengers(and the relaunched New Avengers), and Moon Knightbefore jumping into an exclusive contract with DC Comics in 2010 where he flexed his writing muscles as well as his drawing skills on Batman: The Dark Knight. He also worked on DC’s Forever Evil, and provided art on Wonder Woman (with his wife Meredith on writing duties).

Ringo and Eisner Award-winning Tom King is currently the writer of Batman at DC Comics, where he has also written Mister MiracleGraysonThe Omega MenDC NationSwamp Thing Winter SpecialHeroes in Crisis, and has a story in Action Comics #1000, not to mention his award-winning work at Marvel on The Vision. King’s first book, A Once Crowded Sky, a postmodern super hero novel, was recognized by USA Today as one of the best Graphic Novels of the year. He was named by the Hollywood Reporter as one of the five comic creators to watch in 2015. He was the 2018 Ringo Awards winner of Best Writer, and collected awards for Best Series (Mister Miracle, DC Comics), and Best Single Issue or Story and Best Humor Comic (Batman/Elmer Fudd Special, DC Comics).

Debuting professionally in the 1980s, artist and occasional writer Lee Weeks initially received publication in Eclipse Comics’ Tales of Terror horror anthology. He has contributed to much lauded work on titles such as Marvel’s DaredevilCaptain America, and Spider-Man’s Tangled Web, DC Comics’ bookshelf format Batman Chronicles: Gauntlet, and Dark Horse Comics’ Tarzan vs. Predator. He was also the featured artist in Volume 17 of TwoMorrow Publishing’s Modern Masters. In 2018, he was the recipient of numerous Ringo Awards, including Best Artist or Penciller, and Best Humor Comic and Best Single Issue or Story for his work on DC’s Batman/Elmer Fudd Special.

DC Reveals the Creative Lineup for Detective Comics #1000

DC Comics has unveiled full story details on the landmark 1,000th issue of Detective Comics, debuting on March 27, 2019. The 96-page Detective Comics #1000 celebrates the Dark Knight through a series of seven-to-nine-page standalone short stories from an all-star collection of the top writers and artists in Batman’s recent history including Tom King, Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, Peter J. Tomasi and Doug Mahnke, Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev, Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan and more.

The full lineup of stories, writers and artists to be featured in Detective Comics #1000 is:

“Medieval,” by Peter J. Tomasi and Doug Mahnke

Appearing in DC’s comic book continuity for the very first time, a new and mysterious version of the Arkham Knight will be debuting in a story that looks at Batman’s encounters with his villains throughout his career through the Arkham Knight’s eyes—but the Knight’s scheme remains to be seen.

“Batman’s Longest Case,” by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo

One of the most popular talent teams in the history of the Dark Knight delivers a tale in which Batman follows clues around the world, leading him back to his home in Gotham City and to a secret organization that has been keeping tabs on him for years.

“Manufacture for Use,” by Kevin Smith and Jim Lee

The fan-favorite director of Clerks and one of Batman’s most visionary artists present a story that cuts between Batman fighting his greatest villains and his attempts to track down the gun that killed his parents.

“The Legend of Knute Brody” by Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, Derek Fridolfs and John Kalisz

The villains of Gotham speak, documentary-style, about that one henchman they each hired who was the absolute WORST at his job, constantly screwing up their plans.

“The Batman’s Design” by Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan

Warren Ellis pens “The Batman’s Design” with Becky Cloonan, the first woman to draw Batman in the main comic series, in a story of Batman pursuing a pack of technologically enhanced mercenaries into a warehouse, where they think they’ve trapped him.

“Return to Crime Alley” by Denny O’Neil and Steve Epting

A direct sequel to O’Neil’s classic “There Is No Hope in Crime Alley,” from Detective Comics #457, in which Leslie Thompkins takes Batman to task for his addiction to violence, which, in her mind, perpetuates the horror that birthed him.

“Heretic” by Christopher Priest and Neal Adams

Two of the biggest powerhouse writers and artists in the comic book industry work together on a story featuring Batman helping a young man escape from Ra’s al Ghul’s League of Assassins— who then turned up in Gotham, dead. Batman travels to Tibet with a message for the League.

“I Know” by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev

The creative team behind SCARLET takes a unique future look at Batman and the Penguin. The Penguin comes to an elderly, wheelchair-bound Batman to tell him of the time that he learned Batman was Bruce Wayne—and to explain why he never did anything with that information. This story is available to read in its entirety on DCComics.com.

“The Last Crime in Gotham” by Geoff Johns and Kelley Jones

Superstar writer Geoff Johns and famed artist Kelley Jones tell a future story where the future family of Batman and Catwoman face off in a battle with the family of The Joker and Harley Quinn.

“The Precedent” by James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez

The team of James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez return to DETECTIVE COMICS after their highly successful Rebirth run, in a story of the night Bruce Wayne made the decision to bring Dick Grayson into his dark world, ending with the classic candlelight oath.

“Batman’s Greatest Case” by Tom King, Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones

Groundbreaking BATMAN writer Tom King is joined by Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones, who share artistic duties on the story. Presented using parallel story threads, Bruce Wayne visits his parents’ grave while Batman assembles his entire coalition of allies around him.

In addition to the above stories, Detective Comics #1000 will feature additional art from Mikel Janín and Amanda Conner, as well as a two-page spread from Jason Fabok depicting the current state of the Batman universe and its heroes and villains.

To further celebrate the Caped Crusader’s 80-year legacy, Detective Comics #1000 will offer an extensive retailer variant cover program. Hard-core collectors will want to get their hands on this series of variant covers showcasing the Dark Knight through various decades from iconic Batman artists such as Steve Rude, Michael Cho, Jim Steranko, Bernie Wrightson, Frank Miller, Tim Sale, Jock and Greg Capullo—plus an homage to Jerry Robinson’s cover of November 1942’s Detective Comics #69 by Bruce Timm.

This 96-page oversize collector’s edition issue will be available at comics retailers and digitally on March 27, 2019, for $9.99.

Detective Comics #1000

Preview: Further Adventures of Red Sonja Vol.1

Further Adventures of Red Sonja Vol.1

writer: Roy Thomas, Dann Thomas, Doug Moench, Clair Noto, Frank Thorne, Christie Marx, Charles Dixon, James Owsley, Bruce Jones, Peter B. Gillis, Jim Valentino, Sue Flaxman, Marie Javins, Steve Buccellato
artists: Frank Thorne, E.R. Cruz, Estaban Maroto, Howard Chaykin, Dick Giordano, Terry Austin, John Buscema, Pablo Marcos, Tony DeZuniga, Barry Smith, Ernie Chan, Neal Adams, Geof Isherwood, Luke McDonnell, Armando Gil, Bruce Jones, Steven Carr, Gary Kwapisz, Josef Rubinstein, Gavin Curtis, Keith Williams, Alfredo Alcala, Del Barras, Reggie Jones, Kirk Etienne, Howard Simpson, Rober Quijano
cover: Frank Thorne
FC | 200+ pages | $19.99 | Teen+

Featuring a collection of issues from the original Marvel Comics series “The Savage Sword of Conan,” with each page painstakingly re-mastered for this volume! Plus, Sonja Tales from Kull and the Barbarians, as well as pin-ups!

The Swamp Thing Halloween Horror Special Delivers Scares at Walmart this October

Fans of the Walmart 100-Page Giant comics will be treated to an extra dose of fright this Halloween, as DC’s line of successful anthology comics will now include a special horror-themed one-shot, Swamp Thing Halloween Horror Special. This 100-page, $4.99 comic book includes an all-new story featuring the “Protector of the Green,” Swamp Thing.

“Hollow” is a 12-page story written by Brian Azzarello, with art by fan-favorite artist Greg Capullo. Children can’t help but be curious about what lurks in the woods at the edge of town on Halloween night…and unfortunately for them, this group of trick-or-treaters has crossed paths with a mysterious witch who has her own tale to tell about where curiosity leads—directly into the path of the creature known only as Swamp Thing! Can they escape her clutches? Or is there something much worse out there that they should REALLY fear?

This 100-Page Giant sells for $4.99 and includes several classic fright-filled stories from DC’s history, led by the iconic House of Secrets #92 from 1971, which features Swamp Thing’s very first appearance, written and drawn by co-creators Len Wein (writer) and Bernie Wrightson (artist). 1971’s “Night of the Reaper,” from Batman #237, features two more giants of superhero storytelling, writer Denny O’Neil and artist Neal Adams, telling a Halloween tale of revenge and the search for a Nazi war criminal.

2007’s DC Infinity Halloween Special also contributes to this issue, with stories featuring DC heroes Superman (“Strange Cargo”), Blue Devil and Enchantress (“The Pumpkin Sinister”) and Zatanna (“Kcirt ro Taert”). The book also reprints a Batman tale from the 2008 DC Infinity Halloween Special, “The Ballad of Jonathan Crane,” as well as “Night Gods” from 2010’s The Brave and the Bold, starring Aquaman and the Demon.

The Swamp Thing Halloween Horror Special ships to stores today and should arrive in participating Walmart stores throughout North America by Sunday, October 7.

Review: Batman #50 is a Beautiful, Tragic Romance

If you thought that Batman and Catwoman were going to have a happy wedding with the usual supervillain attack to keep things interesting, then you’re pretty naive. On that confrontational, Batman #50 is a climactic moment in Tom King’s run on Batman, and Mikel Janin and June Chung are onboard as well to show all the romance, heartbreak, and kicking Kite-Man on the face. But the real highlight of this issue is the unleashing of some of the best living Batman and Catwoman artists to tell the love story of Bat and Cat all framed in love letters to each other. Beginning with the great Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez showing them swaddled together in a loving embrace and concluding in a pure negative space, movie poster style page from upcoming Batman artist Lee weeks, this is a wonderful encapsulation of Batman and Catwoman’s relationship done in Tom King’s signature tone poem way.

The letters that Batman and Catwoman write to each other in Batman #50 are a form of psychological probing, which makes sense because Batman is the World’s Greatest Detective and Catwoman is a skilled thief and con woman. They read people basically for a living, but are vulnerable and have huge blind spots. Especially Batman. King writes some beautiful lines where Batman and Catwoman both say that each other’s eyes is what led to their initial attraction. Batman was struck by how complex Catwoman’s eyes were, and that she could be more than a one-off animal themed villain while Catwoman realized how simple and childlike Batman’s were: pure blue. These thoughts come during Tim Sale and Paul Pope’s pages showing Catwoman in her 1990s purple costume pursuing and aggressively flirting with Batman like he’s an innocent boy and not a skilled crime fighter drawn in heroic, stealthy poses by Neal Adams and Lee Bermejo. He’s lost control and maybe has a chance to find happiness like the totally adorable page drawn by Amanda Conner of Catwoman and Batman enjoying a date at the zoo, or this issue’s sexiest moment where Mister Miracle’s Mitch Gerads shows them under a cape blanket with all the accoutrements of crime and crime fighting strewn about. Batman and Catwoman have serious chemistry, which has been boosted by King, Gerads, and Janin’s work on the current series, but are they really marriage material?

One person who shares the idea that getting married would make Batman less miserable and lose his edge is Holly Robinson, Catwoman’s long time friend, who she springs out of Arkham for one night to be her maid of honor/witness. This is a bit of a crazy plot point because the last time she appeared, Holly was fleeing the country as Batman was trying to apprehend her for 237 murders that Catwoman tried to take the fall for. The inclusion of Holly in Batman #50 makes the story a little more twist-filled than a simple case of cold feet (Eat your heart out, X-Men Gold #30), especially the final page that puts a new spin on a famous 1990s Batman storyline. As Selina’s friend, who she saved from child prostitution, Holly has been around Batman since Year One when she stabbed a less than intimidating, fake scar sporting Bruce Wayne partially leading him to choose a costume to strike fear in the heart of criminals. (As a sidenote, it’s pretty epic to see Frank Miller’s lumbering Batman on the page when Catwoman talks about how angry and graceful he was during his early crime fighting days.) But is she a pawn or a mastermind in a larger scheme?

Batman #50 seems to be an inciting incident in a larger Tom King story centered around the breaking of Batman’s heart and not his body. Batman is always surrounded by Gothic elements, like secret passages, large empty mansions, and gargoyles, so adding a doomed romance to the mix makes sense. King and Mikel Janin are working in a larger tradition of Batman getting in the way of Bruce’s happiness, and a couple of DOA romances from other mediums come to my mind. (Vicki Vale from 1989’s Batman, Andrea Beaumont in Mask of the Phantasm, Rachel Dawes in the Nolan trilogy) However, this relationship is different because King has consistently written Batman and Catwoman as equal crime fighting partners and shows this through the symmetry in the composition of their letters (Clayton Cowles’ word bubble placement is impeccable. and even similar poses in the final pinups from Greg Capullo and Weeks. Those two crazy kids had some great, but unfortunately it didn’t work out.

Batman #50 definitely will be a fanbase breaking comic book, and the spoiler-y New York Times article didn’t help matters. However, throughout his run and in homage to Batman and Catwoman’s relationship, Tom King has seeded doubts that the Bat and Cat could settle into a quiet marriage. Bruce is as comfortable with as he is in the tuxedo that Alfred said reminds him of his father. Speaking of Alfred, Mikel Janin crushes a silent sequence where Bruce asks him to be his witness, and all dialogue and narration stops for a four panel hug that segues into aforementioned dreamy page from Mitch Gerads. King and Janin pinpoint these little emotional stingers into the narrative, like Holly complimenting Catwoman’s dress or a symmetrical double page spread where Bat and Cat embrace and kiss one, unfortunately last time. The use of symmetry and formalism in the way Batman #50 is constructed hint at a couple that’s on the same page, but that’s sadly not the reality.

In Batman #50, Tom King, Mikel Janin, June Chung, and a talent group of guest artists craft the ultimate, tragic Batman love story and show the chemistry between Bat and Cat while also showing how their marriage ultimately wouldn’t work out. This definitely isn’t a big, guest star heavy special, but an intimate story of a man, who decides to work out his pain and sorrow dressed as a bat instead of finding love and peace with an enigmatic woman, who dresses like a cat.

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janín
Guest  Art: David Finch, Joëlle Jones, Mitch Gerads, Rafael Albuquerque, Neal Adams, Andy Kubert, Becky Cloonan, Ty Templeton, José Luis Garcia-Lopez, Frank Miller, Lee Bermejo, Trish Mulvihill, Jason Fabok, Brad Anderson, Alex Sinclair, Hi-Fi, Tony S. Daniel, Tomeu Morey, Amanda Conner, Paul Mounts, Tim Sale, José Villarrubia, Paul Pope, Clay Mann, Jordie Bellaire, Jim Lee, Scott Williams, Greg Capullo, FCO Plascencia, Lee Weeks
Colors: June Chung Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 10 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Batman #50

It’s the wedding you never thought you’d see! The Batrimony is real as Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle are set to tie the knot in a can’t-miss, extra-length milestone issue that will reshape Gotham City. All their friends (and a few enemies?) will be party to a comic book coupling for the ages.

The build up has been coming for a while now and with Batman #50 writer Tom King answers the question as to whether Batman and Catwoman tie the knot.

The issue is done in an interesting way with what amounts to two page spreads with generally half dedicated to Batman’s preparation for the day and the other half for Catwoman’s. In between these normal panel pages, there’s full page images by some top art talent on top of which we’re presented the two’s thoughts about their meeting and what they’re about to do.

While the “will they or won’t they” has been spoiled the comic is interesting as it delves into the thought process of two individuals who are clearly nervous about tying the knot and if they do what it means.

Catwoman isn’t a hero, she’s a criminal.

Batman is a hero. He’s a hero driven by his pain.

If they were to get married, what does that mean for each of them? Can Batman be happy? These are the types of thoughts that run throughout the comic as the two characters explore their love for each other. And that’s the impressive thing, Tom King convinces you that these two love each other. By the end, you’re convinced there’s no one else for these two.

And that spoiling? Well, not quite. There’s a twist but you’ll have to read the comic yourself and go elsewhere.

The issues with the comic is the hype and a build up that doesn’t pay off. The quality of the narrative is excellent, it all just doesn’t quite live up to the lead up and the end result is rather predictable. A single panel does not make a comic and this one relies heavily on that final panel.

The art duties are mainly handled by Mikel Janin with colors by June Chung and lettering by Clayton Cowles. The art is solid and there’s some fantastic page layouts. The way some of these pages are laid out is impressive with very creative visual storytelling. What’s also interesting is the use of pin-ups to tell the story as well. There was a similar thing done in Action Comics #1000 and here it sort of works. The artwork is fantastic, there’s some talent. But, it breaks up the story a bit and after a while becomes a little tedious. When the big picture comes in to focus, the choice is an interesting one and adds a poetic aspect, somewhat appropriate considering what’s happening.

This is a chapter in King’s larger story. There’s much more to come as things weave together and that final panel indicates we’ve got a hell of a lot of excitement to come. As a single issue, this one has its good and its bad but as a piece of the larger puzzle it fits like a perfectly crafted piece of the larger picture.

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janín
Pin-up Art: David Finch, Joëlle Jones, Mitch Gerads, Rafael Albuquerque, Neal Adams, Andy Kubert, Becky Cloonan, Ty Templeton, José Luis Garcia-Lopez, Frank Miller, Lee Bermejo, trish Mulvihill, Jason Fabok, Brad Anderson, Alex Sinclair, Hi-Fi, Tony S. Daniel, Tomeu Morey, Amanda Conner, Paul Mounts, Tim Sale, José Villarrubia, Paul Pope, Clay Mann, Jordie Bellaire, Jim Lee, Scott Williams, Greg Capullo, FCO Plascencia, Lee Weeks
Color: June Chung Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 7.5 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

The weekend is almost here and Deadpool 2 is opening! Who’s going to see it this weekend? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for the weekday to end and weekend begin, here’s some comic news from around the web.

CBR – How Neal Adams’ First X-Men Issue Helped Change Comic Book Coloring – Interesting.

ICv2 – Publishing Declines Continued in IDW’s Q1 – Ruh Roh.

Newsarama – iZombie Renewed For Fifth (But FINAL) Season – That’s two that’ll wrap up next year.

Preview: Deadman #6

Deadman #6

(W) Neal Adams (A/CA) Neal Adams
In Shops: Apr 18, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Just as Ra’s al Ghul is hidden in this six-part miniseries, so is his near-demonic influence hidden and slowly revealed in this final issue! Boston Brand’s death was no accident, but a planned and ruthless murder…orchestrated by none other than the Head of the Demon. What Deadman needs now is either death-or the help of the World’s Greatest Detective!

Review: Action Comics #1000

Celebrate 1000 issues of Action Comics with an all-star lineup of top talent as they pay tribute to the comic that started it all! From today’s explosive action to a previously unpublished tale illustrated by the legendary Curt Swan to the Man of Tomorrow’s future-this very special, oversized issue presents the best of the best in Superman stories!

Action Comics #1000 feels like an end, a beginning, and a celebration of a landmark moment, one thousand issues and almost 80 years of Superman. The issue is full of some top notch talent with numerous stories of varied style and quality. All of it though is entertaining in some way.

The issue opens up with writer Dan Jurgens‘ finale to his latest run with “From the City That Has Everything.” It’s clear from his latest run (and all his Superman material) that he loves the character and this story which features art by Jurgens, ink by Norm Rapmund, color from Hi-Fi and letters by Rob Leigh, is that recognition as Metropolis honors the Man of Steel. It’s a cheesy story but one that is so in a way that a speech from someone honoring someone else might be. Touching and a fine way for Jurgens to wrap up his run.

The second story is a really cool one that weaves a story out of what is essentially pin-ups. It’s a great way to include such a thing in a comic without it just being images. I hope we see more of this and the art is from a who’s who of creators. It involves Superman going through time and gives a way for artists to take advantage to take us readers through Superman’s history, some of his key moments, and different artistic styles we’ve seen. It’s an utterly brilliant story and presentation and a highlight of the celebration.

Marv Wolfman and Curt Swan team up for “An Enemy Within” which feels like a bit of a retro story in both pacing and art. While not bad it’s an interesting reminder of how much storytelling has changed over the years. I don’t want to give too much away but the story has some nice twists involving a hostage situation.

“The Game” sees Superman and Lex Luthor match wits in a game of chess. Paul Levitz and Neal Adams team up for the story and it’s interesting and one you can probably debate about the deeper meaning. It’d be nice to see this story in a longer form as there’s a lot to work but with just a few pages we don’t get a lot of depth, just fun twists that feel like they’re from the 80s and an homage to an Adams classic moment.

Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, and Olivier Coipel come together for “The Car” which has a criminal recounting how his car was destroyed by a mysterious flying man. The art is fantastic and I think some of my favorite work by Coipel who seems to be channeling Frank Quitely. It’s such a simple story but one that really digs into what makes Superman super.

“The Fifth Season” sees Scott Snyder and Rafael Albuquerque come together as Superman and Lex Luthor come together in Smallvill. It’s an interesting story that again explores the relationship of the two characters. Particularly it focuses on Luthor being oblivious to the good that Superman does that he doesn’t acknowledge or is even aware of. It’s another story that can be debated as far as its deeper meaning and themes.

“Of Tomorrow” is Tom King, Clay Mann, Jordie Bellaire, and John Workman having Superman revisit Earth one last time before it’s consumed by the sun. It’s a reminder of the loss of the character and a deeply touching entry.

Louise Simonson and Jerry Ordway come together for “Five Minutes” which reminds us that Superman has a few jobs, hero and reporter (as well as husband and father). It’s a fun story that plays on the speed of the character and that how he can some times mess up one job due to the other. A funny ending that gave me a chuckle.

“Actionland!” has Paul Dini and José Luis García-Lopez focus on our favorite imp who has it out for Superman. It’s the odd story of the bunch with the focus on the villain but is a reminder that like Superman, some of them have infinite power that they hold back due to… something.

Writer Brad Meltzer and artist John Cassaday honor Christopher Reeve with “Faster Than a Speeding Bullet” that has Superman racing to prevent a gun going off and killing a woman. It’s a fantastic story and I had no idea how it’d resolve. Again though, it’s a reminder of some of the things that makes Superman great and boils the character down to his goodness and how he inspires and is inspired.

“The Truth” is Brian Michael Bendis‘ DC debut with art by Jim Lee and what is supposed to lead into the miniseries The Man of Steel which kicks off Bendis’ run. Out of all of the stories, this is the low point of the issue honestly. Maybe it’s the hype but there’s a new baddie who’s out to kill Kryptonians and while Metropolis is getting destroy two civilians are focused on Superman’s underwear? It’s very Bendis and while funny, especially with Lee on art, it doesn’t quite work and honestly lowered my excitement for what he has coming.

There’s a lot packed in here and something for everyone. No matter the era of your enjoyment there’s a story that fits it and this is really a comic that has an amazing amount of talent. It’s truly a celebration of such an iconic character and for the celebration alone it’s a purchase. At times, comics like this are a let down, but this is the exception with every story entertaining in some way and a few that shine. It’s the rare oversized celebration comic that lives up to the occasion.

Story: Dan Jurgens, Peter J. Tomasi, Marv Wolfman, Paul Levitz, Neal Adams, Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, Scott Snyder, Tom King, Louise Simonson, Paul Dini, Brad Meltzer, Brian Michael Bendis
Art: Dan Jurgens, Patrick Gleason, Curt Swan, Neal Adams, Olivier Coipel, Rafael Albuquerque, Clay Mann, Jerry Ordway, José Luis García-Lopez, John Cassaday, Jim Lee
Ink: Norm Rapmund, Butch Guice, Kurt Schaffenberger, Kevin Nowlan, Scott Williams
Color: Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, Dave McGaig, Jordie Bellaire, Trish Mulvihill, Laura Martin, Alex Sinclair
Letters: Rob Leigh, Tom Napolitano, Dave Sharpe, Nick Napolitano, John Workman, Carlos M. Mangual, Josh Reed, Chris Euopoulos, Cory Petit
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Ninja-K #6

NINJA-K #6 (NEW ARC! “THE COALITION” – PART 1)

Written by CHRISTOS GAGE
Art by JUAN JOSÉ RYP
Cover A by TONCI ZONJIC (FEB181894)
Cover B by ALAN QUAH (FEB181895)
Interlocking Variant by CLAYTON CRAIN (FEB181896)
Ninjak Icon Variant by NEAL ADAMS (FEB181897)
Pre-Order Edition by DAVID WILLIAMS (SEP172024)
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On Sale APRIL 11th

ALL-NEW ARC! ALL-NEW JUMPING-ON POINT! “THE COALITION” – PART ONE!

A once-loyal agent has defected from the ranks of MI6’s most elite espionage unit…and Ninjak has been dispatched across the globe to prevent his secrets from plunging the world into chaos. But in the shadows of Mexico City, Colin King is about to discover something far more deadly… The Ninja Programme’s own former sensei, the Jonin, has assembled a conspiratorial circle of enigmatic enemies – the Dying One, Kostiy the Deathless, Linton March, and The United’s Ultimo – for a purpose so sinister that even Ninjak can’t risk engaging them alone. Enter Livewire, Punk Mambo, Dr. Mirage, and GIN-GR – Ninjak’s brand-new black ops team with a very specific set of skills…and a license to kill the unkillable!

Acclaimed writer Christos Gage (Netflix’s Daredevil) and high-octane artist Juan José Ryp (BRITANNIA) take the driver’s seat for a heart-stopping race to save the world as “THE COALITION” prepares for the ultimate clash of super-teams!

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