Tag Archives: june chung

Preview: Batman #42

Batman #42

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janin
Color: June Chung Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Editor: Jamie S. Rich Associate Editor: Brittany Holzherr
In Shops: Mar 07, 2018
SRP: $2.99

“Everyone Loves Ivy” part two! Poison Ivy has taken control of every man, woman and child on the planet, and only Batman and Catwoman have escaped her influence. But will the pair of them be enough to nip this in the bud?

Preview: Kong on the Planet of the Apes #1

Kong on the Planet of the Apes #1

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Ryan Ferrier
Artist: Carlos Magno
Colorist: Alex Guimaraes
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Mike Huddleston
Connecting Cover: Carlos Magno
Pulp Subscription Cover: Hans Woody
Retailer Variant Cover: Jae Lee and June Chung
Retailer Incentive Cover: Jae Lee
Price: $3.99

The damn dirty crossover event you demanded!
Following the events of the first Planet of the Apes film (1968), Dr. Zaius and General Ursus lead a small group of soldiers to the Forbidden Zone to destroy any remaining evidence of Taylor’s time among them. To their surprise, they discover…A KONG!

Now they must venture to Skull Island with Cornelius and Zira to discover the truth, but they may not survive the deadliest journey of their lives!

BOOM! Studios’ Kong comics are based on Joe DeVito’s Skull Island and Merian C. Cooper’s King Kong.

Preview: Sisters of Sorrow #1 (of 4)

Sisters of Sorrow #1 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: Kurt Sutter, Courtney Alameda
Artist: Hyeonjin Kim
Cover Artists:
Main Cover:
Jae Lee & June Chung
      Variant Cover: Andre De Freitas
FOC Variant: Valentine De Landro
Price: $3.99

  • Kurt Sutter (Sons of Anarchy, Mayans MC) brings this all-new original tale of revenge and recovery to comics with novelist Courtney Alameda (Shutter) and breakthrough artist Hyeonjin Kim.
  • By day, Dominique, Greta, Misha, and Sarah run a nonprofit women’s shelter. At night, they each don a nun’s habit and move through Los Angeles hunting down violent abusers who have escaped justice.
  • Their increasingly public vigilantism has earned them the nickname Sisters of Sorrow, and has drawn the ire of L.A.’s notorious anti-crime task force.

Review: Batman #26

STL049830MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

Tom King is putting his own touches on the long and incredible Batman history with Batman #26, which continues The War of Jokes and Riddles. In the second chapter of this tale, we discover that this war between The Joker and The Riddler had happened a year after Bruce became Batman. This is similar to the excellent Zero Year Scott Snyder and Greg Cappulo created in their run a few years ago. Batman’s past is always being retold, and it is amazing that after this many fantastic runs by so many good creators, it can still be interesting. Thankfully, in my opinion, King is off to a great start with this arc, and I am excited to see where this goes.

Here we get a different version of The Riddler. He’s angrier, a little more out there, and even has his shirt unbuttoned, exposing his bare chest (now complete with a carved in question mark), and a long ponytail. There have been so many different versions of Nigma, and it was fun to see another one. He came across as a little bit of a Guy Ritchie character, and while he was still obsessed with the riddles, seemed a much more intimidating foe physically, instead of just mentally. The Joker is mostly similar to the classic version you all know and love (or hate), and he is obsessed with jokes, and punchlines, and searching for them in this story. It creates some awkward comedy, as he’s a lost comedian looking for a reason to laugh. Unfortunately killing seems to be the only thing that he seems to find humor in. Together these two crime kings of mind games are preparing to go to war with each other (see, this arc is not just a clever name), which will set up the other villains of Gotham City to join sides.

As for art, Mikel Janín once again shows he was made for this book. I have enjoyed every artist on this book. Be it, Gerads, Finch, and others, but Janín provides splash pages that are pure works of art. Each of the artists provide a unique style to this run, and it makes it so much better. DC should be applauded for this, and more specifically, the editorial team. The other thing I wanted to mention about Janín, is the way he draws emotion. The looks on The Joker, Riddler, Ivy, Batman, and others in this book is incredible. Sometimes you don’t even need the text to know what they’re thinking.  June Chung does a fantastic job on colors, by playing with the different shades of green, purple, and blue for each of their respected villians and hero.

So far, The War of Jokes and Riddles is a lot of sadistic fun, and while it is another dark and brooding Batman story, sometimes those are the best ones. There’s just enough intrigue and mystery just around the shadowy corner of this arc to be excited to see where it goes, even if it does seem a bit disturbing at times. King has proven he can deliver an ending before, and I am hopeful that this story cements his run as another iconic tale in the bat-history. I recommend this book, as well as Batman #25, which started this arc.

Story: Tom King Pencils, Inks & Cover: Mikel Janín
Colors: June Chung Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: The Power of the Dark Crystal #4 (of 12)

The Power of the Dark Crystal #4 (of 12)

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Artists: Kelly and Nichole Matthews
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Kelly and Nichole Matthews
Subscription Cover: Sana Takeda
Variant Cover: Jae Lee and June Chung
Price: $3.99

While Jen and Kira deal with the chaos the Skeksis have wrought on the castle, Thurma and Kensho are out in the wilds of Thra on the run from the Crystal Guard, unaware that something far more treacherous followed their trail: the Chamberlain.

Preview: The Power of the Dark Crystal #3 (of 12)

The Power of the Dark Crystal #3 (of 12)

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Artists: Kelly and Nichole Matthews
Cover Artists:
Main Cover A: Kelly and Nichole Matthews
Subscription Cover B: Sana Takeda
Variant Cover C: Jae Lee and June Chung
Variant Cover D: Jae Lee and June Chung
Price: $3.99

While Jen and Kira deal with the chaos the Skeksis have wrought on the castle, Thurma and Kensho are out in the wilds of Thra on the run from the Crystal Guard, unaware that something far more treacherous followed their trail: the Chamberlain.

Preview: The Power of the Dark Crystal #1 (of 12)

The Power of the Dark Crystal #1 (of 12)

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Artists: Kelly & Nichole Matthews
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Jae Lee and June Chung
Subscription Cover: Sana Takeda
Incentive Cover: David Petersen
Foil Incentive Cover: Jae Lee and June Chung
Price: $3.99

In celebration of the 35th anniversary of Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal, return to the world of Thra in an official sequel to the beloved fantasy film.Discover an all-new race of creatures called Firelings that live in a realm near the planet’s core, based on official character designs by Brian Froud.

Discover an all-new race of creatures called Firelings that live in a realm near the planet’s core, based on official character designs by Brian Froud.

Years have passed since the events of the original film, and though Jen and Kira have ruled Thra as King and Queen, bringing Gelfling back to the land, they have become distracted by power and can no longer feel or see the needs of the world the way they once did.Thurma is a young

Thurma is a young Fireling tasked with stealing a shard of the Dark Crystal to restore power to her realm. Along the way she’ll befriend the young Gelfling Kensho, accidentally bring back the Skeksis and Mystics, and embark on one incredible adventure.

powerdarkcrystal_001_a_main

Review: Batman #13

bm_cv13_ds“I want to break your damn back.”

“I Am Suicide” comes to a close in Batman #13, and it has been an interesting arc. It did a good job of keeping me guessing throughout the story, and it has a great bait and switch with the last issue and this one. I really liked what they did with Catwoman and Batman’s relationship in this arc, and it comes full circle in this issue. The small scene where they kiss after everything was done was great. They have always had a really deep relationship, and though they are on opposite sides of the law, they are more alike than they are different. Tom King recognized that, and really explored it throughout this storyline. I loved the personal letters between The Bat and The Cat in previous issues, and it was really cool to see both of their flaws and how much they opened up to each other. It looks like the next arc will go deeper into their relationship, and I am really excited to see where King takes us, as he has shown, especially in this arc on the meaning of “I Am Suicide”, that he will make provocative choices with the characters.

The way this issue ties things together is well done. We get to see Bronze Tiger, Punch and Jewlee, The Ventriloquist, and especially Catwoman play major roles in what we realize is now Batman’s master plan to take Bane down. As Bane is pummeling bats, he is telling him how after he got off the venom, he realized he was a weak man, much like him. He tells Batman he will be the monster he seeks, because like the “I Am Suicide” title plays with, according to Bane, Batman is seeking death in another’s arms. He goes as far as to say they are both too weak to put the gun to their own head and end their lives. It is an interesting idea, and a very controversial one, but I like how King has Bane say this, and not Batman himself. Bruce however, did say that he tried to take his own life after his parents died in the last issue, and that he died himself that day, but I took that as more of Bruce Wayne spiritually died when Batman was born. Either way it is an interesting premise to show us that Batman is human, and has flaws.

batman-13_4Mikel Janín is a fantastic artist, and I have loved his work on this series. He does a great job in this issue of balancing the panels between the set up and our characters pulling everything off. The way Janín draws The Ventriloquist is creepy and perfect. I feel like he is looking at me with his little beady eyes behind those glasses. He also does an excellent job with facial expressions. The look on Psycho Pirate’s face as he attempts to control The Ventriloquist is a fantastic moment. I shouldn’t mention the art without mentioning how well he draws Batman and Catwoman, and I have said that before, but I will say it again. I love his version of Batman. It feels new, but still very classic. He is brooding, angry, and hard to read like the Batman we know, but he is also vulnerable, and at times can show emotion. Catwoman is very similar, and has an old school charm to her that I really like. I feel like I am seeing a little Michelle Pfeiffer and a little Julie Newmar in her, but that may just be what I see. The colors are also well done, as June Chung has been very consistent throughout.

I do see that this run so far has been a little polarizing, but I really have enjoyed it so far. Tom King has done a great job on giving us something different for Batman, and that is what I want. Sure, I want familiar things and tone to this book, but I also want a new take on the character, and that is exactly what we are getting. A lot of this issue, and this story overall had some over the top moments, but that is what makes it fun for me. We see him take on hundreds of guards and survive, we see him seemingly have his back broken and snap it back into place, and we see Punch and Jewlee blow bubbles into a raft they all escape on. I think that is what Tom King is doing best on this series, marrying the ridiculousness of a being a superhero, with the flaws of being a human being.

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janín Color: June Chung
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Batman #12

bm_cv12_dsWhen I first finished Batman #12, I was left wanting more. After the twist at the end of the last issue involving Catwoman, I couldn’t wait to see what would happen with the Bat, the Cat, and Bane. Instead, we are given an issue where Batman fights his way through hundreds of men again to get to Bane and Psyco Pirate, who is now joined by Catwoman. I did enjoy the issue when I finished it, but I enjoyed it so much more after I had thought about it. That’s what Tom King does. He is giving us a layered version of Batman, and I am really enjoying that.

We get another letter told throughout the comic, but instead of it being from Catwoman, this time it is from Batman. I really enjoyed the raw look at the man behind the mask. With how vulnerable he was in opening up to Selina, you would think this is more from Bruce than Batman. However, it seems that he is saying he is Batman, because the ten-year-old boy, Bruce died the day he promised to avenge his parents. We are given the line I am suicide, which is not just the name of this arc where Batman forms his own Suicide Squad, but also pointing to the fact that he died that day, and now lives as the face of vengeance. This was great writing, and it is not the first time I and many other people have said this about Tom King this year.

bm_12_2-3The one thing we’ve seen over and over again from Batman, is his parents, and how he deals with it. It’s at the core of who he is. But Tom King finds an angle I haven’t seen before. Bruce reflects on his parent’s laughter, and how he wishes he could laugh. It is such a simple thing people take for granted and it was very interesting to see him hoping for the day where he can find joy in something, and simply laugh. Bruce and Selina have always had a very interesting relationship, and he sums up why in this issue. They are the same thing. They are both dead. When they are together, and they kiss, they see each other’s deaths. Now, of course, they are not truly dead, but this shows that it isn’t Bruce being Batman, it is Batman being Bruce. He and Selina open up for only each other. That is very powerful coming from he hero of few words, and with her seemingly betraying him, you really feel for Bruce (or Batman) by the end. As much as he says he’s dead to the world, it is obvious Selina matters to him, because she makes him feel.

The art by Mikel Janín is nearly flawless. I am glad he is on this title, and I hope he stays around for awhile. Like Tom King, he is a super talent. Hugo Petris and June Chung do a nice job on inks and colors as well. Most of the comic is filled with large page filling panels with Batman either fighting a ton of henchmen or making his way through and outside of the prison. It is strangely beautiful and is a nice contrast to the dark nature of Batman’s letter, the betrayal he is feeling, and the prison itself.

While I wanted a conclusion and a final showdown between the Bat, the Cat, and Bane, this was still a great issue. It may feel like a filler or unnecessary issue to some, but either way, we learn more about Batman here, and Tom King is doing a great job at showing the humanity, the flaws, and the heart of the Caped Crusader. He is doing this to help Gotham Girl. That is what being dead is to Batman, to give his life for the city and people he has sworn to protect.

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janín Ink: Mikel Janín/Hugo Petris Color: June Chung
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

The Dark Crystal Gets a Comic Book Sequel

Archaia and The Jim Henson Company have announced The Power of the Dark Crystal, a new comic book series that serves as a sequel to the beloved 1982 film, The Dark Crystal.

Based on the screenplay by David Odell, Annette Odell, and Craig Pearce that was written for a planned feature film, the 12-issue monthly limited series is adapted by Eisner Award-nominated writer Simon Spurrier and illustrated by rising artists Kelly and Nichole Matthews. The first issue of The Power of the Dark Crystal debuts on February 15, 2017.

Countless decades have passed since the events of the original film. Though Jen and Kira have ruled Thra from the Crystal Castle peacefully as King and Queen, bringing Gelfling back to the land, they have become distracted by power and can no longer feel or see the needs of the world and its people the way they once did. Enter Thurma, a young Fireling girl tasked with obtaining a shard of the Dark Crystal—by any means necessary—to restore power to her realm. This sets in motion an incredible adventure in which Thurma will attempt to steal a crystal shard, befriend the young Gelfling Kensho, and accidentally bring back the Skeksis and Mystics.

The story of The Power of the Dark Crystal is that of reconciling the inner and the outer worlds—perhaps even the unconscious and the conscious.

The main cover to issue #1 is illustrated by Eisner Award-winning artist Jae Lee and June Chung. Variant covers are illustrated by Sana Takeda and David Petersen.

the-power-of-the-dark-crystal-1-main-cover-by-jae-lee-and-june-chung

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