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Review: The Wrong Earth #6

The Wrong Earth #6

With their secret identities endangered on both worlds, Dragonfly and Dragonflyman each resort to a shock tactic to protect the other’s status quo!

The first volume of The Wrong Earth wraps up with a main story that’s a headscratcher and will leave you pondering the last five issues. Written by Tom Peyer, the issue is more of a “what now” for Dragonfly and Dragonflyman as each is stuck on the wrong planet. Peyer shifts gears in a way with this chapter taking s away from the homage/spoof comics of the series instead into philosophical territory that touches upon nature vs. nurture. Though they’re from two very different worlds, are the two heroes all that different? It’s a very interesting way to focus the first volume. Add in a a last page that has the possibilities rolling, I’m excited for what volume two will bring.

The art by Jamal Igle, ink by Juan Castro, color by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen is top notch as usual. The ability of the team to give two distinct worlds such personality but at the same time make them similar is impressive.

This main story didn’t end as expected, and that’s a good thing, as the series has consistently subverted expectations and delivered one of the best reads of 2018 and so far a solid 2019.

But, that’s not all!!!

Dragonfly wraps up its story from writer Paul Constant, artist Gary Erskine, colorist Andy Troy, and letterer Rob Steen. It too is an entertaining chapter though a bit more predictable. It’s nice to see an adventure of one of the heroes on his own and how he handles the situation.

But there’s more!

Carol Lay, Matt Brady, and Steffie De Vaan deliver prose with Lay, Joe Orsak, and Cayetano Valenzuela providing illustrations. All are interesting reads and feel like the in addition to bonus of the comic which makes you feel like you’re getting even more bang for your buck.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Carol Lay, Matt Brady, Steffie De Vaan Art: Jamal Igle, Gary Erskine, Joe Orsak, Cayetano Valenzuela
Ink: Juan Castro Color: Andy Troy
Letterer: Rob Steen
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

It’s Dragonfly & Dragonflyman from AHOY Comics for Free Comic Book Day timed for The Wrong Earth Vol. 1

AHOY Comics—the startup publisher that pledged for readers to “expect more” from its line of comic book magazines in 2018— will publish its inaugural Free Comic Book Day issue in 2019. From the pages of the breakout hit comic book magazine The Wrong Earth by writer Tom Peyer and artists Jamal Igle and Juan Castro, comes Dragonfly & Dragonflyman by Peyer, artist Russ Braun and colorist Andy Troy. On gritty Earth-Omega, Dragonfly prowls the darkness for his evil prey; on sun-splashed Earth-Alpha, Dragonflyman protects the status quo. Dragonfly & Dragonflymanwill be available at participating comic book stores on Free Comic Book Day, Saturday May 4th, 2019.

Like all AHOY Comics Book Magazines, Dragonfly & Dragonflyman will feature an assortment of extras, including:

  • An early adventure of space hero Captain Ginger… from when he was a kitten, by writer Stuart Moore (Deadpool the Duck, Batman: Noir Alley) artist June Brigman (Power Pack), inker Roy Richardson and colorist Veronica Gandini;
  • A a brand new cartoon by Hunt Emerson, in which Edgar Allan Poe battles his nemesis, the Black Cat;
  • A new prose piece by Hart Seely;
  • A cover by Wrong Earth artist Jamal Igle.

Timed to the release of Dragonfly & Dragonflyman #1, AHOY Comics will publish The Wrong Earth Volume 1 Trade Paperback, collecting the critically acclaimed lead stories, all the original back-features featuring Stinger, Dragonflyman and Dragonfly, plus a generous selection of AHOY text-feature extras, including a prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: ‘HUD’ HORNET’S HOLIDAY IN HELL, illustrated by best-selling artist Rob Steen, and a cartoon by Shannon Wheeler. The Wrong Earth Volume 1 Trade Paperback will be available in comic book stores on May 1, 2019 and in bookstores later that month.

Free Comic Book Day Dragonfly & Dragonflyman

Review: The Wrong Earth #3

The grim vigilante Dragonfly violently crosses a line, shocking the upright citizens of Earth-Alpha. Meanwhile, the campy Dragonflyman succumbs to the pressures of confinement on gritty Earth-Omega. Plus, Stinger investigates the supernatural mystery of the Specter of the Sidekick Museum.

The Wrong Earth has gone three for three in excellence with another issue that’s top notch entertainment. Two versions of the same hero on two Earth’s, the series again perfectly balances being an homage and send up of the comics before it.

On one Earth is Dragonfly, the vigilante hero on an Earth that’s more innocent and his actions are so over the top, it’ll make you laugh. Writer Tom Peyer pulls off this sort of moment in a way that is enjoyable, funny, serious, it just pulls all of that off at the same time. The opposite of that situation is Dragonflyman which is the more family friendly hero stuck in a gritty 80s/90s world and we get to see what that might do to the character.

Peyer does the impressive thing creating a story that perfectly balances every aspect of itself. It can be a send-up/spoof. It can be an homage. It can just be enjoyed. It can be all of the above. The comic is so layered and done in a way where you can pick and choose why you enjoy it. Add in moments like the opening with the trial of Ms. Deuce and it’s hard to not enjoy the series as it bathes in tropes and comic history.

Then you take the art by Jamal Igle with ink by Juan Castro, coloring by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen and it all becomes more impressive as the styles of the two worlds are clear. They’re done in the “style” for that period of comic history and for one creative team to go back and forth between the two so easily is impressive.

Peyer and Igle have taken whats come before and remixed it in a way were it’s both new and familiar. And with that it continues to shine as an amazing read.

And that’d be enough, but there’s more!

Writer Paul Constant and artist Frank Cammuso give us an adventure featuring Stinger. The story is a throwback in many ways and the art can only be described as amazing in not just what’s presented but the entire design which has an aged look to it all.

But again, there’s more!

Writers Matt Brady, Rob Staeger, and Carol Lay each contribute prose writings with art by Joe Orsak, Elliott Mattice, and Lay, all of which is entertaining and just adds to the “value” of it all.

Again, AHOY Comics and the team on this comic has delivered entertainment from start to finish. It again shows we should expect more from our comics and AHOY is again making the case that they should be the publisher of the year and this is one of the best monthly comics being put out right now.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Matt Brady, Rob Staeger, and Carol Lay
Art: Jamal Igle, Frank Cammuso, Joe Orsak, Elliott Mattice, Carol Lay

Ink: Juan Castro Color: Andy Troy, Frank Cammuso Lettering: Rob Steen, Frank Cammuso
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Britannia: Lost Eagles Of Rome #4

BRITANNIA3_004_COVER-B_GILLDeep within the heart of Egypt, there is unrest…and Antonius and Achillia have stumbled right into the middle of it! On the hunt for the Roman Empire’s missing banners at the behest of Emperor Nero, history’s first detective and his fearsome gladiatrix companion find themselves on the brink of many revelations: Who is responsible for the plagues threatening their Roman brethren? And who is this new revolutionary calling himself Pharaoh?

And like that, another Britannia miniseries comes to a close. Another four issue toe-dip into the live of Antonius Axa and his friends, colleagues and enemies that ends with a satisfying conclusion that never once feels rushed. It does wrap things up in a way that leaves little a room for for a sequel without any loose ends dangling annoyingly as the fourth issue closes.

In a series that has, across the previous eleven issues, established a precedent for gorgeous artwork, brutal violence and a smattering if dark humour, Peter Milligan‘s script for Britannia: Lost Eagles Of Rome #4 once again delivers on the hallmarks of the series. And, once again, the art is spectacular. Robert Gill (with Juan Castro) has a deft hand when it comes to realising the emotions of the faces of his characters as well as the bloody swordplay they will inevitably engage in seemingly every issue. One could argue that each comic follows a basic formula of “Talky Bit, Fighty Bit, Talky Bit, Revalation!, Talky Bit”, and to some extent that’s true, but it’s an oversimplification of the plot and comic book itself. After all, can’t we break every comic down to that same basic formulae?

As a concluding chapter to the third Britannia series, I was impressed. Milligan kept the story a relatively simple affair that didn’t stray as deeply into the supernatural as it has in the past, instead allowing the characters to shine.

There’s a scene in which Nero’s growing madness is visible, and though he’s still a few year from burning Rome to the ground, you can see the emperors slow descent into the madness that we’ll continue to witness in the background of future installments to the series – something history aficionados and fans of the series will enjoy getting to witness in comic book form.

Lost Eagles Of Rome may be the third series under the Britannia  banner, but it can be read independently of the others  without giving the reader any real trouble when it comes to understanding the plot (though  I’m sure you know the blurb about getting the most out of the story, read it all, etc.). But whether you have read the first two volume or not, there’s plenty to enjoy with a detective story set nearly two thousand years ago spanning several countries wrapped up in a powerseizing conspiracy story that a gladiator and the detectioner tackle together.

I thoroughly enjoyed the series, and hope that Milligan and Valiant have another in the works for us.

Story: Peter Milligan Art: Robert Gill with Juan Castro Colours: Jose Villarrubia
Story: 8.1 Art: 9 Overall: 8.4 Overall: Buy if you’ve bought the rest

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Wrong Earth #2

The saga of two world-swapped heroes continues! On gritty Earth-Omega, the cheerful Dragonflyman faces off against corrupt, violent police. Meanwhile, the naïve authorities of colorful Earth-Alpha enrage the grim Dragonfly.

I gushed over The Wrong Earth #1, the debut comic from AHOY Comics and the second issue is just as good diving deeper into its exciting world. The Wrong Earth #2 is both a spoof and homage of comics, a brilliant balancing act that’s impressive and I’d imagine hard to do. Writer Tom Peyer nails the mix as we bounce between the two worlds and two different heroes.

It’s hard to really praise the writing in this series. What’s pulled off is utterly brilliant. While the concept of taking a modern “grim and gritty” hero and placing them in an innocent world and vice versa might sound simple, being able to get the tones of it all right isn’t. Each interaction you have characters whose tone and vibes are opposite. You have situations and characters that clash. Yet, this flows perfectly.

Peyer also is able to balance both lovingly playing with and poking fun at the concept. You can spoof it and just go over the top making fun of comics past and present. You can play it for straight and put forward what you think is the best of both eras. But this series in its two issues does both. Characters will remind you of other comics and the beats do too. It takes that seriously playing up a loving kiss to it all. But, it does it in such an over the top way at times it’s hard to not see it as an entertaining goof too.

The art by Jamal Igle with ink by Juan Castro, color by Andy Troy, and lettering by Rob Steen is on point. Igle and the team perfectly nail the styles of the two eras. It would be expected for a series to employ two artistic teams to pull off what Igle, Castro, and Troy do, but the trio pull off the amazing by bouncing between the eras in a way that each character continues their innocent or gritty in the opposite world. What’s more impressive is nothing seems completely out of place, it still works visually. The details too in the art add to the story allowing the reader to understand more about each hero and how they differ.

All of that alone would merit a 10 out of 10 across the board, but with AHOY you should expect more!

In this issue’s back-up comic story, Dragonflyman and Stinger confront the dastardly menace called NIMBY! Writer Paul Constant, artist Tom Feister, and letterer Rob Steen deliver a second comic featuring the heroes and it has the fun innocence playing off of comics of the time. Of course there’s winks and nods and it’s just a fun bonus to read.

And that’s not all… it’s an AHOY comic, we’re getting more.

The comic features prose writing and instructions to microwave a meal featuring the writing of Kek-W, Bryce Ingman, and Mark Russell, and art by Carol Lay, Alan Robinson, and Joe Orsak. It’s all solid and honestly seeing as how I loved this comic for the main story, this is all bonus and it’s entertaining bonus material. The comic for me is the draw and the rest is extras that only add to the value of it all.

The first issue was fantastic, the second is just as amazing. AHOY Comics launched and told us to expect more from comics and in two issues they have me doing exactly that. This comic would be worth the price for the main story alone but then there’s a second comic, plus prose stories, and it’s all good. This is seriously some of your best value for your money when it comes to comics and this publisher is at another level.

Story: Tom Peyer, Paul Constant Kek-W, Bryce Ingman, Mark Russell
Art: Jamal Igle, Tom Feister, Carol Lay, Alan Robinson
Ink: Juan Castro Color: Andy Troy Letterer: Rob Steen
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

AHOY Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Britannia: Lost Eagles Of Rome #3

BRITANNIA3_003_COVER-A_MACKAntonius Axia has survived the wilds of Britain and witnessed the horrors of his own homeland…and now, the trail of Emperor Nero’s stolen eagles relics has led him and gladiatrix Achillia to the newly annexed province of Egypt! But, those who once held power in the Fertile Crescent might not be so quick to welcome them…or any other nosy Romans, for that matter!

There’s something strangely refreshing about reading a comic that is effectively a police drama set in the first century AD. Unlike the previous two issues, there’s no hint of the supernatural elements that featured in the previous two minieries (nor the titular island), but I find the lack of these things add an interesting element to the story – Antonius is waiting for, or at least aware of the possibility that these things exist in the world, but hasn’t yet come to the conclusion these things are the only solution.

Peter Milligan is joined by a host of talented artists this issue (full credits below), and once again delivers a comic that maintains the consistent quality established from the outet of this miniseries and avoids any of the pacing issues that can plague four issue story arcs. Contrary to what you’d expect, there is a definite feeling at the end of this issue that the story can be wrapped up in the following 22 odd pages; most four issue miniseries I’ve read lately seem to spend two and a half issues setting up the story only to rush it’s conclusion in the following issue. No, instead we get a well paced comic that balances the proceedural aspects of a detective show with the swordplay you’d hope given the timeframe of the story.

Artistically, the comic is another win as Robert Gill (with Juan Castro and Brian Theis)’s line work is clean, concise and oh-so-easy to read. The choreography during the fight scenes highlights our heroes’ skills without diminishing the threat of those they’re facing, and the scenary has a beautifully ominous feel about it. Surely the sense of forboding within these pages comes from Jose Villarrubia (with Andrew Dalhouse)’s colouring work.

Britannia: Lost Eagles Of Rome #3  has this miniseries on pace to be the best yet of the three in Peter Milligan’s story – and was the first in which I wasn’t waiting for the cameo of another Valiant character. Ultimately, if you’re already reading this series then you’re going to be happy with this issue. If you’re not partaking in Britannia, why not?

Story: Peter Milligan
Art: Robert Gill with Juan Castro
and Brian Theis
Colours: Jose Villarrubia
with Andrew Dalhouse Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.8 Art: 8.9 Overall: 8.9 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Britannia: Lost Eagles of Rome #3 (of 4)

BRITANNIA: LOST EAGLES OF ROME #3 (of 4)

Written by PETER MILLIGAN
Art by ROBERT GILL with JUAN CASTRO and BRIAN THIES
Colors by JOSÉ VILLARRUBIA with ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by DAVID MACK
Cover B by MJ KIM
Variant Cover by ANDRES GUINALDO
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | VALIANT PRESTIGE | T+ | On Sale SEPTEMBER 19

Where have the eagles landed?

Antonius Axia has survived the wilds of Britain and witnessed the horrors of his own homeland…and now, the trail of Emperor Nero’s stolen eagles relics has led him and gladiatrix Achillia to the newly annexed province of Egypt! But, those who once held power in the Fertile Crescent might not be so quick to welcome them…or any other nosy Romans, for that matter!

Renowned writer Peter Milligan (Detective Comics) and fan-favorite artist Robert Gill (X-O MANOWAR) follow the LOST EAGLES OF ROME into dangerous territory – and unleash a terrible new threat on the ancient world!

Preview: The Wrong Earth #1

The Wrong Earth #1

(W) Tom Peyer, Paul Constant, Grant Morrison (A) Juan Castro, Shannon Wheeler (A/CA) Jamal Igle
In Shops: Sep 12, 2018
SRP: $3.99

AHOY Comics launches with a biting superhero satire! On one world, Dragonflyman and his sidekick Stinger enjoy a life of adventure. On another Earth, the Dragonfly hunts criminal parasites like a lethal exterminator. But what happens when these two heroes change places? By Tom Peyer (Captain Kid, Hourman) and Jamal Igle (Black, Supergirl)! And, a “Golden Age” Stinger solo story, by Paul Constant and Frank Cammuso! Plus: An all-new text story by comics legend Grant Morrison: “‘Hud’ Hornet’s Holiday In Hell,” illustrated by Rob Steen! All this plus a cartoon by Shannon Wheeler!

Check Out These Previews of What We Can Expect From AHOY Comics

Earlier today we brought the news of the launch of AHOY Comics, a new publisher who has already announced four series with an impressive group of creators. Now, we have a look at the actual series that we’ll be able to enjoy starting in September.

THE WRONG EARTH

6 Issue mini-series by Tom Peyer and Jamal Igle

AHOY Comics launches with a biting superhero satire written by Tom Peyer (Captain Kid, Hourman), penciled by Jamal Igle (Black, Supergirl), inked by Juan Castro (Transformers),and colored by Andy Troy. On one world, Dragonflyman and his sidekick Stinger enjoy a life of adventure. On another Earth, the Dragonfly hunts criminal parasites like a lethal exterminator. But what happens when these two heroes change places?

On sale on September 12, 2018, THE WRONG EARTH debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • A  prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: ‘HUD’ HORNET’S HOLIDAY IN HELL, illustrated by best-selling artist Rob Steen
  • A mock “Golden Age” Stinger solo story, by Paul Constant and Frank Cammuso
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

HIGH HEAVEN

5 Issue Mature Readers mini-series by Tom Peyer and Greg Scott

Chronic malcontent David Weathers dies and goes to Heaven—where everything is terrible, and everybody hates a complainer. HIGH HEAVEN is a savage satire by writer Tom Peyer (Hourman, Batman ’66) with art by Greg Scott (Black Hood, X-Files), colored by Andy Troy.

On sale, September 26, 2018, HIGH HEAVEN’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with a cover by Mad Magazine’s Richard Williams and extras including:

  • A HASHTAG: DANGER backup story by Peyer, with art by Chris Giarrusso (G-Man, Mini-Marvels)
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler
  • An all-new prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: FESTIVE FUNTIMES AT THE NEW WORLD’S FAIR, illustrated by acclaimed artist Rick Geary

In October, AHOY Comics will launch a creator owned title:

CAPTAIN GINGER

4 issue mini series by Stuart Moore and June Brigman

When the human race died out, the cats inherited the Earth! Or at least one starship. Now the intrepid Captain Ginger struggles to keep his fellow felines united against a hostile universe. Thirty-five pages of comic adventure—with a bite—by writer Stuart Moore (Deadpool the Duck, Batman: Noir Alley) artist June Brigman (Power Pack), inker Roy Richardson and colorist Veronica Gandini.

On sale, October 17, 2018, CAPTAIN GINGER’s debut issue is a full color, 48 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • An all-new text story by comics legend Grant Morrison: THE ELECTRIC SKY BEAR THAT INSPIRED BEN FRANKLIN, illustrated by Phil Hester
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

October will also see the debut of an all star anthology series:

EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR

6 issue Mature Readers mini series

EDGAR ALLAN POE mangles classic tales and brand new stories in this cross between Drunk History and Tales from the Crypt! First, meet AHOY’s own alcohol-damaged version of Poe in The Facts in The Case of M. Valdemar, adapted by Tom Peyer (Batman ‘66) and drawn by Fred Harper. Then: Sugary cereal meets vampirism in Dark Chocolate, by writer Mark Russell (The Flintstones) and artist Peter Snejbjerg (Starman).

On sale, October 31, 2018, EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • Hunt Emerson’s take on The Black Cat
  • Unsettling verse by Cienna Madrid illustrated by Carly Wright

Review: This Nightmare Kills Fascists

There has been an awakening in the public arena due to the 2016 American Presidential election. An election the world is still reeling from the ramifications. Artists, especially those who operate in the comic realm, were (and are) particularly incensed. This cognizance of international politics is very present in the excellent anthology This Nightmare Kills Fascists.

In “Diane The Hunter” the proliferation of violence on women is explored, as a pair of assailants, walk right into a “wolf trap”. In “Thermonuclear Hunger Strike,” a worst-case scenario of what the world will be under President Trump is played out, with an assassin taking apart the oligarchy that is left. In “The Pledge,” a young man despite his girlfriend’s pleas pledges a fraternity who is known for their misogyny and racism. During a hazing ritual they unleash an ancient evil. In “Dear Jane,” a woman who wakes up from a sleep undergoes a carefully constructed game, one that is the stuff of nightmares. In “Black Friday,” a man’s impulsive actions to leads to death of a stranger ad the one person he would kill for.

In “This Land,” America is reimagined as a country drawn along racial lines, literally. A family gets into a dangerous game of fox and hound, as a band of racist vigilantes chase them down, ending in the bloodiest way. In “Yellow,” a woman who has been emotionally abused by her husband over time, eventually hits turning point, one which she redefines her sense of self worth.  In “A Forest,” a man who was protesting deforestation, gets killed by something, not from this world. In “Devil Daddy,” a young lady who was raped by Satan himself, reclaims her power.

In “Long Division,” one woman who is helping to build the wall along the Mexican border, becomes part of it most horrific section, one where torture of American becomes legal. In “Thank God,” the evils of taking the Bible literally is played in this one high school. In “Do Unto Others,” the demagogue virtues of religious freedom is explored, ending up in just desserts. In “Fury From The Deep,” the dangers of fracking is brilliantly told and just how those who run in the industry has no limits on the evils they will do. In “Office Party,” a Senator who opposed heath care gets a Scrooge like visit, which leaves him not changed but horrified.

In “The Abyss Of Observation,” a writer’s observations about the Siege of Sarajevo, is played in dramatic fashion. In “The Price Of Fashion,” a young lady obsessions with clothes, proves deadly for one of her lovers. In “One In Heart and  mind,” a woman’s faith is shaken once she finds out exactly who her pastor is.

Overall, an engrossing anthology which pulls you into every page and highlights each artist and writer at the top of their game. The stories by each writer shows their depth at wielding a meaningful story while remembering to entertain. The art by each artist displays their synchronicity with each story providing readers with depth and warmth. Altogether, a book which means to stir the incendiary nature of every good human being. It not only does that but makes them aspire to higher.

Story: Vita Ayala, Justin Jordan, Ryan Ferrier, Michael Wernke, Erica Schultz, Forrest Helvie, Tyler Chin-Tanner, Ryan Lindsay, Matt Miner, Tini Howard, Christopher Sebela, John Bivens, Dave Ebersole, Joe Corrallo, Andrew Shaw, Eric Palicki, Fabian Lelay, Ryan Cady
Art: Eric Zawadzki, Crees Hyunsung Lee, Kelly Williams, Juan Castro, Claire Connelly, Joseba Morales, Yosam Cardenas, Soo Lee, Ariela Kristantina, Christian Dibari, Katy Rex, Matt Harding,  Jamel Jones, Sean Van Gorman, Don Cardenas, Fabian Lelay, Philip Sevy
Story: 10 Art: 8.8 Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy

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