Tag Archives: john byrne

John Byrne’s Iconic X-Men Run To Receive Artifact Edition Treatment in July

One of the most requested Artist’s Edition-style books is finally on its way – John Byrne’s X-Men Artifact EditionJohn Byrne, thought by many to be the quintessential X-Men artist, began his legendary run on the title with issue #108 in 1977. Already a major hit in the Marvel Universe, Byrne, along with his co-creators Chris Claremont and Terry Austin, brought the    X-Men to the highest levels of popularity. To this day their run on the X-Men is one of the most fondly remembered series’ ever published by Marvel Comics.

Now IDW Publishing is proud to present John Byrne’s X-Men Artifact Edition, a gorgeous 12” x 17” Artist’s Edition style book featuring more than 100 pages of Byrne’s X-Men work, each and every one scanned from the rare and valuable original art. The only way you could have a better look at these originals would be if you were sitting next to Byrne as he was drawing them!

IDW’s Artist’s Editions have been praised for their beauty and meticulous attention to detail, they have won five prestigious Eisner Awards to date. John Byrne’s X-Men Artifact Edition will arrive in July.

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: Isolation

Star Trek: New Visions: Isolation

John Byrne (w & photo manipulation)

Captain Kirk has found himself all alone on the Enterprise before—but what happens when each individual member of the crew finds themselves in a similar state? And who is behind this… isolation?

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Lost Siegel And Shuster Superman Story To Be Published in New Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman Hardcover Book

A new hardcover book, Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman, is being published by DC Entertainment as part of its celebration of the one-thousandth issue of Action Comics—the longest continually published comic book of its kind in history, the series that introduced Superman to the world and the title that launched the superhero genre. The collection features a series of essays and iconic Superman stories edited by former DC Publisher Paul Levitz. Most notably, the book includes a never before published 12-page story from original Superman writer Jerry Siegel with art by the Joe Shuster Studio titled “Too Many Heroes.”

The 384-page hardcover book will cost $29.99 and hit store shelves on April 19. Highlights and key Superman stories in this collection include:

  • A new cover by legendary artist and DC Publisher Jim Lee
  • Text pieces including: an editor’s note by Paul Levitz, a tribute to Action Comics by Laura Siegel Larson (daughter of Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel), an introduction by Jules Feiffer, plus essays by Tom DeHaven (“It’s Superman!”), David Hajdu (“The Ten-Cent Plague”), Larry Tye (“Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero”) and Gene Luen Yang (Superman, New Super-Man and the National Book Award finalist “American Born Chinese”)
  • “The Coming of Superman,” from Action Comics #1, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Joe Shuster
  • “Revolution in San Monte,” from Action Comics #2, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Joe Shuster
  • “The Terrible Toyman!,” from Action Comics #64, written by Don Cameron with art by Ed Dobrotka and George Roussos, featuring the debut of Toyman
  • “The Super-Key to Fort Superman,” from Action Comics #241, written by Jerry Coleman with art by Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye, featuring the first appearance of the Fortress of Solitude
  • “The Super-Duel in Space,” from Action Comics #242, written by Otto Binder with art by Al Plastino, featuring the debut of Brainiac
  • “The Supergirl from Krypton!,” from Action Comics #252, written by Otto Binder with art by Al Plastino, featuring the debut of Supergirl
  • “The World’s Greatest Heroine!,” from Action Comics #285, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Jim Mooney
  • “The Superman Super-Spectacular!,” from Action Comics #309, written by Edmond Hamilton with art by Curt Swan and George Klein, featuring an appearance by President John F. Kennedy
  • “Superman Takes a Wife,” from Action Comics #484, written by Cary Bates with art by Curt Swan and Joe Giella
  • “If Superman Didn’t Exist…” from Action Comics #554, written by Marv Wolfman with art by Gil Kane
  • “The Game,” a new original story written by Paul Levitz with art by Neal Adams
  • “Squatter,” from Action Comics #584, written by John Byrne with art by Byrne and Dick Giordano
  • “Ma Kent’s Photo Album,” from Action Comics #655, written by Roger Stern with art by Kerry Gammill and Dennis Janke
  • “Secrets in the Night,” from Action Comics #662, written by Roger Stern with art by Bob McLeod
  • “A Hero’s Journey,” from Action Comics #800, written by Joe Kelly with art by Pasqual Ferry, Duncan Rouleau, Lee Bermejo and others
  • “The Boy Who Stole Superman’s Cape,” from Action Comics #0, written by Grant Morrison with art by Ben Oliver
  • “The Mystery of the Freight Train Robberies,” from Action Comics #1, written by Fred Guardineer with art by Guardineer, featuring the debut of Zatara
  • “The Origin of the Vigilante,” from Action Comics #42, written by Mort Weisinger with art by Mort Meskin, featuring the debut of the Vigilante
  • “The Assassin-Express Contract!,” from Action Comics #419, written by Len Wein with art by Carmine Infantino and Dick Giordano, featuring the debut of the Human Target

Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman is just part of DC’s Superman celebration, with the seminal Action Comics #1000 also released in April and a series of Superman-themed variant covers and even more to come.

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions, Vol. 6

Star Trek: New Visions, Vol. 6

John Byrne (w & a & c)

Presenting all-new tales set in the Star Trek: The Original Series universe, done in a unique, one-of-a-kind photomontage style, using images from the classic TV series. It’s as close as fans will ever come to getting new episodes featuring the original cast. Includes the stories “The Traveler,” “Time Out of Joint,” and “All the Ages Frozen.” Collects issues #15–17.

TPB • FC • $17.99 • 128 pages • ISBN: 978-1-68405-176-2

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: The Hunger

Star Trek: New Visions: The Hunger

John Byrne (w & photo manipulation)

For thousands of years, it had drifted above the outer rim of the Galaxy, draining life from all the worlds it found there. Now, it has learned of the banquet of populous planets near the heart of the Milky Way, and is heading there at terrifying speed—with only the Enterprise standing in its way.

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: What Pain It is to Drown

Star Trek: New Visions: What Pain It is to Drown

John Byrne (w & photo-manipulation)

Pulled down to a world made entirely of water, the Enterprise is in danger of literally flooding — while Spock and McCoy discover a sinister purpose behind this bizarre planet.

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: All the Ages Frozen

Star Trek: New Visions: All the Ages Frozen

John Byrne (w & photo-manipulation)

On a world locked deep into an ice age, Kirk and the crew investigate the disappearance of a team of Federation scientists, and discover a long-lost civilization whose only survivor is intent on saving them… even if it kills them!

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: Time Out of Joint

Star Trek: New Visions: Time Out of Joint

John Byrne (w & photo-manipulation)

Captain Kirk is torn from his timeline. Every corner he turns, every door he opens, throws him into a different day, a different year—and a different danger.

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Preview: Star Trek: New Visions: The Traveler

Star Trek: New Visions: The Traveler

John Byrne (w & photo-manipulation)

A mysterious Traveler is pursued by a ruthless robotic horde. Or is he? Jim Kirk must answer that question before his ship and crew are lost!

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Flashback Friday Friday Review: Fantastic Four #281

fantastic_four_vol_1_281New York City is in flames due the hatred stoked by the Hate-Monger and his crew including the mysterious Malice (in bondage gear) and Psycho-Man, a concept and story you’d think was rather appropriate for this day and age. The issue is broken up with a few storylines including Daredevil leaping around attempting to stop a hate crime. Reed Richards and Johnny Storm are hold up at the Avengers Mansion attempting to figure out what’s going on and Johnny is more focused on a missing Alicia Masters.

All of that eventually leads to Mr. Fantastic, the Human Torch and Daredevil battling Malice to eventually learn, it’s really Sue who has been brainwashed by the Hate-Monger who has brought out her anger towards her brother and Reed. A slap in the face later Sue is snapped out of it breaking down into tears.

Released in 1985 for a pocket breaking 65 cents, Fantastic Four #281 is a comic that can be read on its own but is best as part of the multi-issue story arc that’s going on at the time, which includes Secret Wars II.

Much of the issue is a set up for those final few pages featuring the confrontation with Malice. And lets focus on this incarnation of Sue Storm. There’s the skimpy bondage like out which you can catch some of on the cover. What’s missing is the leather mask featuring spikes an amazing top ten for questionable comic costumes of the time. There’s the motivation of Sue too which is chalked up to jealousy of everyone. And her being snapped out of it by a slap is icing on the cake of this particular issue as if Sue is “hysterical” and this will wake her. It just reeks of the trope of the hysterical woman and it’s almost comical if it weren’t so odd.

honkyThe oddity includes Daredevil’s segment which begins with his swinging around the city dealing with crime and protecting a woman who is being assaulted by two individuals. All of that leads to a rather infamous scene of the hero being punched by the woman who states:

Don’ touch me! I don’t want no jive honky touchin’ me!

This was 1985! Did anyone talk like that in 1985? I was all of six so don’t remember. Has anyone talked like that period!? It’s bad writing drawing upon a stereotype that today is humorous in how bad it is. And this was written by John Byrne who is considered a legend by many!

The art too is by Byrne with inks be the also legendary Jerry Ordway, colors by Glynis Oliver, and letters by John Workman. As I mentioned, Sue’s “Malice” personality is utterly hilarious in the design. Generally, everything is classic Byrne in its style and for those familiar with his work seeing the pages, it’s clear it’s him. None of it is absolutely amazing, but it’s classic for the time.

The issue is infamous for so many reasons, and what’s interesting is that the story and issue could easily be updated for today and be relevant in some ways. The idea of a person driving NYC to hate and tearing the city apart is a story that could easily fit in 2017 and with some tweaks, it’d be absolutely amazing. The parts that had me sighing are par for the time period with horrible costumes, moments that just don’t fly today, and a very different flow of the comic and dialogue compared to today.

It’s an interesting comic for the time showing off the good, the bad, and the just plain weird.

Story: John Byrne Art: John Byrne Inks: Jerry Ordway
Color: Glynis Oliver Letters: John Workman
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

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