Tag Archives: joe brusha

Review: Hellchild: Blood Money #1

Hellchild: Blood Money #1

For anyone who watches Richard Madden’s work, you know he’s one up and coming actor. Most people got introduced to him through Game Of Thrones where he played the heroically tragic Robb Stark, a flawed leader whose bad decisions caught up with him ultimately. Lucky for him, his fate did not go the way of most television actors, in fact, he’s done a few films and starred in a few more shows each one possessing a stellar story. One of his first ones was Medici where he played the oft mentioned bankers for the Vatican, in a rather captivating tale.

Another story that put him front and center was The Bodyguard. In the story he played David Budd, a British Secret Service agent charged with guarding the UK Home Secretary. He protected someone who everyone disliked and had people looking to kill them at every turn. In the debut issue of Hellchild: Blood Money our protagonist while working as a hired gun gets pulled into a wasp nest of pandemonium.

We are taken to the Hollywood Hills in California where Jake, the son of a powerful politician has made a life changing mistake, one that could end life as he knows it. His father’s head of security decides to hire Jessica Blackstone, aka Hellchild, a bodyguard with some otherworldly talents. Meanwhile, the two girls Jake killed worked for a powerful gangster, somebody who wants to be paid for what considered his property.

Overall, an action-packed debut issue that plays into the bigger Grimm Fairytales Universe while setting itself apart at the same time. The story by Ralph Tedesco, Joe Brusha, and Dave Franchini is fun, gory and pulse pounding. The art by Butch Mapa, Taylor Esposito, and Dijjo is magnificent. Altogether, an exceptional debut that deftly blends crime thrillers and genre shows.

Story: Ralph Tedesco, Joe Brusha and Dave Franchini
Art: Butch Mapa, Taylor Esposito and Dijjo
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Grimm Fairy Tales: Day of the Dead Vol. 1

Grimm Fairy Tales: Day of the Dead Vol. 1

Humankind in one form or the other has always been obsessed with the dead. With the pain of the loss of loved ones writers have explored how one would bring back those we have lost?  Shows like The Returned pondered what would people do if friends and family who died returned to the living? Often, these stories would espouse the dangers of having these beings return and how they were not the same people.

Then there are stories like the award-winning animated film Coco. The movie actually explored a world where our dead loved ones lived. I often wondered after watching the movie how would it be if someone had the power to raise the dead? In Grimm Fairy Tales Day Of The Dead from writers Dawn Marquez and Joe Brusha, a new hero has this very power but some shadowy organizations are looking to use her gifts for evil purposes.

We are taken to New Orleans, where one unfortunate young lady is mystically taken to a graveyard, where she is sacrificed for a villain to gain powers. We are also introduced to Mary Medina, who is haunted by her powers and is looking for any distraction to lead her away from her worries.  She soon finds that though something was calling her to New Orleans, it wasn’t her talisman, as an evil energy has breached the city limits and are trying to steal her powers. As she makes a new ally, one whose unique powers are enough to save her but raises even more questions, on why these two even met in the first place. By book’s end, Mary and her new friend’s bond is stronger than ever, they have temporarily stopped the evil alliance, but also may have played into exactly what this treacherous group had been planning all along.

Overall, a well-developed story heaped high with excellent characters and even better story execution. Marquez and Brusha are at the top of their game with this series’ story. The art by the creative team is utterly gorgeous. Altogether, a marvelous tale that shows heroes can be from any walk of life.

Story: Joe Brusha and Dawn Marquez
Art: Dawn Marquez, Erick Arciniega, Robby Bevard, Jorge Cortes and Marco Lesko
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: Grimm Fairy Tales: Day of the Dead Vol. 1

Grimm Fairy Tales: Day of the Dead Vol. 1

Humankind in one form or the other has always been obsessed with the dead. With the pain of the loss of loved ones writers have explored how one would bring back those we have lost?  Shows like The Returned pondered what would people do if friends and family who died returned to the living? Often, these stories would espouse the dangers of having these beings return and how they were not the same people.

Then there are stories like the award-winning animated film Coco. The movie actually explored a world where our dead loved ones lived. I often wondered after watching the movie how would it be if someone had the power to raise the dead? In Grimm Fairy Tales Day Of The Dead from writers Dawn Marquez and Joe Brusha, a new hero has this very power but some shadowy organizations are looking to use her gifts for evil purposes.

We are taken to New Orleans, where one unfortunate young lady is mystically taken to a graveyard, where she is sacrificed for a villain to gain powers. We are also introduced to Mary Medina, who is haunted by her powers and is looking for any distraction to lead her away from her worries.  She soon finds that though something was calling her to New Orleans, it wasn’t her talisman, as an evil energy has breached the city limits and are trying to steal her powers. As she makes a new ally, one whose unique powers are enough to save her but raises even more questions, on why these two even met in the first place. By book’s end, Mary and her new friend’s bond is stronger than ever, they have temporarily stopped the evil alliance, but also may have played into exactly what this treacherous group had been planning all along.

Overall, a well-developed story heaped high with excellent characters and even better story execution. Marquez and Brusha are at the top of their game with this series’ story. The art by the creative team is utterly gorgeous. Altogether, a marvelous tale that shows heroes can be from any walk of life.

Story: Joe Brusha and Dawn Marquez
Art: Dawn Marquez, Erick Arciniega, Robby Bevard, Jorge Cortes and Marco Lesko
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Paradise Court #1

When it comes to crime noir, there is nothing like towns with secrets. In every town there are always skeletons and much more that is hiding in the shadows. In the last season of the highly entertaining and recently cancelled Hap and Leonard, the story revolved around a town which a reporter friend of theirs goes missing. As they start poking their noses everywhere, they find the town is seething with KKK members, rapists, pedophiles, and crooked cops. The scary reality of this situation is that more often than not, we do not know our neighbors, like we should.

As many neighborhoods have people who mind their own business and rarely know of the evil that dwells nearby. As this is what scary stories are made of and even scarier legends are abounding with, as the undercurrent of reservation when everything seems tranquil, is what makes these perfect pictures, not as flawless. This is more frequent for those who grew up in big cities as we are used to seeing the evil men do. In the first issue of Joe Brusha and Allan Otero’s Paradise Court, a couple visits their friends in one such neighborhood only to find their hesitations proven true.

While taking a cross country trip, a young couple stops to visit one of their long lost friends who live in an idyllic gated community in the Midwest. Not long after they arrive, they find out that a girl has gone missing and that something sinister may be lurking behind the mansions and well-manicured lawns of Paradise Court. Nothing is what it seems in this comic.

Overall, a skin crawling debut issue which will remind readers of some of the best horror movies of yesteryear. The story by Brusha is creepy, tense, and may make you jump out of your seat. The art by Otero is sleek and gorgeous. Altogether, one of the better horror comic books to come out in years.

Story: Joe Brusha Art: Allan Otero
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Paradise Court #1

When it comes to crime noir, there is nothing like towns with secrets. In every town there are always skeletons and much more that is hiding in the shadows. In the last season of the highly entertaining and recently cancelled Hap and Leonard, the story revolved around a town which a reporter friend of theirs goes missing. As they start poking their noses everywhere, they find the town is seething with KKK members, rapists, pedophiles, and crooked cops. The scary reality of this situation is that more often than not, we do not know our neighbors, like we should.

As many neighborhoods have people who mind their own business and rarely know of the evil that dwells nearby. As this is what scary stories are made of and even scarier legends are abounding with, as the undercurrent of reservation when everything seems tranquil, is what makes these perfect pictures, not as flawless. This is more frequent for those who grew up in big cities as we are used to seeing the evil men do. In the first issue of Joe Brusha and Allan Otero’s Paradise Court, a couple visits their friends in one such neighborhood only to find their hesitations proven true.

While taking a cross country trip, a young couple stops to visit one of their long lost friends who live in an idyllic gated community in the Midwest. Not long after they arrive, they find out that a girl has gone missing and that something sinister may be lurking behind the mansions and well-manicured lawns of Paradise Court. Nothing is what it seems in this comic.

Overall, a skin crawling debut issue which will remind readers of some of the best horror movies of yesteryear. The story by Brusha is creepy, tense, and may make you jump out of your seat. The art by Otero is sleek and gorgeous. Altogether, one of the better horror comic books to come out in years.

Story: Joe Brusha Art: Allan Otero
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

SDCC 2018: Zenescope To Premiere Revenge of Wonderland

After a three year hiatus, Zenescope’s smash hit series returns with Revenge of Wonderland. The first issue will be released at San Diego Comic Con and hit shelves at comic book retailer shops in late July. Zenescope’s Wonderland series became a breakout sensation for the young publishing house back in 2007 with its original title: Return to Wonderland. The company went on to publish several sequels and prequels over the following eight years. In 2012, Zenescope debuted Alice in Wonderland which sold out of the initial 20,000 copy print run within the first week of its release.

Revenge of Wonderland is a twisted tale of love, loss and vengeance. The story follows “The Duchess” as she rises to power within the now abandoned dimension of Wonderland and begins to fill it with brand new inhabitants of her own twisted design. But the Duchess’s disturbing creations will force Calie Liddle – and her daughter, Violet – back into Wonderland to confront a brand new horror that neither is prepared to face. Raven Gregory returns to write the series based on a story by Zenescope’s Ralph Tedesco, Joe Brusha, and Dave Franchini. Artist Allan Otero will illustrate the six part mini-series.

Zenescope will also be launching a Revenge of Wonderland marketing campaign with collectible sticker art prints. The company will be giving hints out where to collect the stickers up until the series release. On the series release date, fans can collect the final sticker and can assemble the art print with the stickers they have collected. The first fan to send a full image of the art print will be drawn into Zenescope’s next Wonderland series and get free tickets to attend any comic con on Zenescope’s 2019 show schedule.

Review: Robyn Hood: The Hunt #2

Things go from bad to worse for Robyn. Not only is she trapped in a maximum security prison with her deadliest enemies but the Warden has passed his own sentence on her…and his verdict is death.

It seems even surrounded by enemies, Robyn has a few allies in Robyn Hood: The Hunt #2. Writer Joe Brusha reveals who really wants her dead along with revealing that the same people are visiting the next day. This forces Robyn to trust her cellmate, as they plan an escape. That of course means fighting for their lives to do so. Lots of action to come is set up.

The issue increases the number of fight scenes for artist Daniel Maine to have fun with and it all pushes the plot forward. Each fight scene seems to have some purpose and reveals small secrets about Robyn’s imprisonment. Main creates both well-flowing panels along with the needed story telling.

I’m curious to see how things shift in the upcoming issues as the comic moves into the escape portion of things.

Story: Joe Brusha Art: Daniel Maine
Story :8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Grimm Fairy Tales: Tarot #1

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The Mysterious Order of Tarot has emerged from the shadows with its sights set on ruling the Realms of Power. With the courts of Swords, Cups, Wands, and Pentacles at his command the Emperor is ready to launch his assault on the Grimm Universe and the only thing that stands in his way is a wild card named, Talisman.

Grimm Fairy Tales: Tarot #1 gives us an inescapable destiny and a man who is stubborn enough to run from it. Always on the run, he attempts to avoid all he can to become the King of Pentacles and that means relying on those whose past actions are extremely suspicious. Reluctantly Talisman has very litttle choice, as his life may depend on it.

The art by Ranto Rei blends fantasy and reality seamlessly. It showcases various magical worlds for brief periods of time, as the story leaps between them and Earth. It manages to pack in a lot of action and story in the process as well. It even shows various creatures of myth, including the Morrigan and goblins.

Story: Joe Brusha Art: Renato Rei
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

 

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Zenescope’s Grimm Fairy Tales Returns in December

Zenescope Entertainment has announced that Grimm Fairy Tales, the company’s flagship series, returns this December.

Grimm Fairy Tales is the cornerstone of Zenescope’s Grimm Universe and its evolution shows just how much the company has grown over the past eleven years. The new Grimm Fairy Tales follows Sela’s daughter, Skye Mathers, who has taken over her mother’s responsibilities as the Guardian of the Nexus. And series creators Joe Brusha and Ralph Tedesco are taking the epic series back to its roots.

The new series will follow Skye as she attempts to guide those who may have untapped special abilities and are heading down the wrong path in life.  Each story will be self-contained and very much in line with the earlier issues of the original series.

Grimm Fairy Tales #1 features 7 covers by some of the industry’s best talent, including David Finch, Eric Basaldua, Greg Horn, Talent Caldwell, and Josh Burns. The creative team includes veterans and newcomers alike, boasting names such as, Grimm Fairy Tales co-creator and writer Joe Brusha, jaw-dropping interior art by Ediano Silva, colors by Ivan Nunes, and letters by Taylor Esposito of Ghost Glyph Studios.

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Zenescope’s E.V.I.L. Heroes Delivers Destruction in July 2016

As of late, Zenescope Entertainment has been rolling out a variety of titles that one might not associate with the popular publisher. A few weeks ago Zenescope released their Aliens vs Zombies trade paperback and they are nearing completion of their Escape from Monster Island series. Zenescope is also past the halfway point for their new urban legend horror title, Satan’s Hollow. This week is the unveiling of Death Force, a powerful revenge tale.

July holds the most talked-about title of the lot. A new foray for the Philadelphia-based publisher, E.V.I.L. Heroes is the recounting of humankind being enslaved by Superheroes. Will mankind survive and remain strong enough to challenge their self-appointed masters? Or will we be pushed closer to extinction?

The E.V.I.L. Heroes creative team features Zenescope co-founder and writer Joe Brusha, artist Eric J, and colorist Marco Lesko.

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