Tag Archives: featured

Review: Electric Warriors #1

A new tale of the future DC Universe, set in a previously unexplored timeline-the Cosmic Dark Age!

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: Weapon H #10

Weapon H #10

(W) Greg Pak (A) Guiu Vilanova (CA) Philip Tan
Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 21, 2018
SRP: $3.99

QUEEN’S RULE!
Weapon H and his team finally discover Roxxon’s power source inside Weirdworld: sorceress Morgan le Fay! And she is not happy about her new role as a Dario Agger’s backup generator. Roxxon has more than light bulbs up it’s sleeves, though – and Weapon H is about to learn how dangerous Agger can be.

Movie Review: Ralph Breaks the Internet

ralph breaks the internetRalph Breaks the Internet may not be as good as the original, but it still has the same heart that its predecessor did. It takes a while to find its bearings, but when it lays in to making fun of internet culture and fellow Disney properties, it becomes an amazing thing to watch. And down deep, there’s a great story about friendship… and insecurities.

It’s been 6 years since the events of our first film, and everything is exactly as we last saw it. Wreck-It Ralph (John C Reilly) and Vanellope von Schweetz (Sarah Silverman) are still best friends. But while Ralph is enjoying the routine of his life, Vanellope wants more. She’s tired of racing around the same tracks over and over. And so, when Wi-Fi is installed in the arcade, Ralph and Vanellope find themselves scouring the internet for a part to fix the Sugar Rush game.

Of course, then they find themselves without the money to purchase what they need and find themselves at the mercy of the very strange economy of the internet. This is where the film takes off as they visit various locales trying to make some money. This includes a Grand Theft Auto / Twisted Metal type online racing game, where they encounter a racer played to perfection by Gal Gadot. I know this is weird to say about a 30-something and a 10-year old, but you really sort of ‘ship her with Vanellope. Friendship, of course! *wink*

Speaking of great new characters, we also get to meet “Yes,” (Taraji P Henson) the algorithm behind a Buzzfeed/YouTube type site. The film endlessly skewers internet trends and viral videos, which not only makes for a lot of fun but also some wry commentary on what it is we do for entertainment online.

But the absolute breakout scene of the film (Minor spoiler, but an early version of this scene was shown at Comic Con, so this shouldn’t be news to anyone) is Vanellope learning that she is now one of the Disney princesses.  Not only is this the best scene in the film, but they went to the lengths of getting as many of the original voice actors for each of the Disney princesses as possible. It’s also a great commentary on the tropes of Princessdom. Oh, and while in the Disney area, they make fun of Star Wars. A lot. It’s perfect.

What ends up working the most about this film is that it is driven by these two characters who we as the audience can see are drifting apart and want different things. We also see them making bad choices in how they communicate with one another about their wants and insecurities, which makes them drift even further apart. it’s a great introspection on friends and friendship and friends drifting apart.

The only downside of this is I’m not sure kids will buy into this message. It feels much more like an adult conversation about insecurities and why it’s hard to maintain adult friendships, whereas kids just make friends because they’re into the same stuff and in close proximity to one another.

The other downside of the film is it’s not clear if this will keep the same classic vibe that the original Wreck-It Ralph did. By being very comfortably retro, it set itself apart as being sort of a film placed outside of time: thanks to nostalgia for classic 8-but arcade games, it already has a classic feel before it’s even made.

This film trades in that classic vibe for such current and prescient content/memes as Fortnite dances, and it’s unclear what cultural impact (if any?) this will have several years from now. Then again, you might have said the same thing about Q-bert or Street Fighter, and we still have all of those characters in Wreck-It Ralph.

One thing writer-director Rich Moore knows is comedy. As a veteran of The Simpsons and writer/director of some of its most classic early episodes (“Homer vs. Lisa and the 8th Commandment” is a personal favorite), he knows how to bring giant belly-laughs and smart satire. All of that is served up here in giant Thanksgiving-sized helpings.

The only problem is the film takes 20 to 30 minutes explaining its newly revised premise until the funny really kicks in. Sequels usually can forgo some basic exposition and cut to the chase, but this has to reset its basic premise before wackiness can ensue. And it doesn’t really hit its stride until that scene where we’re making fun of Disney princesses. It hits that climax about 2/3 of the way through, and rarely approaches the same heights again. It’s really unfortunate, but at the same time, it’s hard to remember a better single scene of any animated film in the past several years. Those five minutes are worth the price of admission alone.

The original Wreck-It Ralph works so well because of its giant heart.

When Ralph embraces that he’s a bad guy and is willing to use his badness to save his new, weird, glitchy friend, we all shed a tiny tear. It’s a beautiful story about broken people finding each other and being ok with not being “perfect” according to everyone else’s standards.

Ralph Breaks the Internet might break your funny bone, but not your heart. It’s missing some of that beautiful magic of the first, but it’s sure to be a crowd-pleaser for families looking for a great time in theaters over the holiday season.

Here’s hoping Disney will green-light a third film where they just make fun of Disney properties.

3.75 out of 5 stars

PS- Be aware there are two after-credits scenes, but neither is a must-see. However, at least one provides more of the meta-humor poking fun at the film and its marketing. They’re worth sticking around to suck the extra marrow out of the film, but if your little kids have to run to the potty and can’t hold it much longer, you won’t miss too much. This isn’t the MCU. . . yet.  Wait a minute. . . Here’s a pitch: Ralph Wrecks the MCU— IN 2024! Crossover with Marvel vs. Capcom! Make it a team-up with Deadpool. BRILLIANT!!! Rich Moore– call me.

Review: Mandela and the General

Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid hero and first leader of the new South Africa, is an international symbol of the power of a popular movement to fight structural racism. But his fight for democracy almost spiraled into an all-out race war. Knowing he couldn’t avert a bloodbath on his own, he reached out to General Constand Viljoen, the former chief of apartheid South Africa’s military.

This graphic novel chronicles the struggle of transition of South African from the apartheid state to the democracy of today and the men who avoided war to do so.

With today’s reality this graphic novel by John Carlin and Oriol Malet is more interesting now than ever.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Star Trek Shipyards Starfleet Ships: 2294-The Future The Encyclopedia of Starfleet Ships, Out Now

For the first time ever, a chronological history of the Starfleet starships from Star Trek television shows and films!

From Eaglemoss Collections, this hardcover book is an in-depth reference of Starfleet vessels from the 24th Century as well as time traveling ships from the distant future.

The handy guidebook is out now in comic shops and book stores.

You can order yours now!
Amazon

 

Eaglemoss Collections provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Bitter Root #1

One of the most underrated filmmakers of all time is Mario Van Peebles. His movies both entertain and provoke thought. New Jack City brought the world to the inner city and made it face the crack dilemma. Panther told the story of the Black Panthers through a rather unique perspective. Then there is the movie which I consider his best, Baadasssss, about his father’s monumental film that started the conversation of what Black people would like to see in theaters.

His movies filled a space where people rarely saw themselves on screen. The films sometimes were based on real life and sometimes delved into other genres where he made sure to change the game. He challenged the trope that black people usually died in fantasy and horror films by making them the heroes. His most recent show on Syfy, Superstition, revolved around a demon hunting family in New Orleans. This last foray into television yielded mixed results. It lacked a few things but was an exceptional concept. In the first issue of David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene’s Bitter Root, the promise shown in that show is fully realized in a similar concept with a few twists.

We are transported to 1920s Harlem where a young couple is killed by mysterious circumstances. In the comic we meet the Sangerye family, a group of demon hunters whose purpose is to protect New York and cancel the apocalypse. We also meet Doctor Sylvester who is searching for a serum to control his supernatural condition. The Sangeryes may be his only hope.

Overall, the first issue is an excellent debut that unfolds like Dirty Dozen meets the Italian Job where one badass family is about to save the world.  The story by David F. Walker and Chuck Brown is action packed, epic, smart, funny and challenges just about every supernatural trope. The art by Sanford Greene is stunning and luminous. Altogether, one of the best books to come from Image in a while, one that already has changed the game.

Story: David F. Walker and Chuck Brown Art: Sanford Greene
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Uncanny X-Men #1

Uncanny X-Men is back and kicks off “X-Men Disassembled,” a ten part weekly event! This is a must for X-Men fans.

Uncanny X-Men #1 is by Ed Brisson, Matthew Rosenberg, Kelly Thompson, Mahmud Asrar, Rachelle Rosenberg, Joe Caramagna, Mirko Colak, Ibraim Roberson, Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, and Guru-eFX.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Avengers #10

Issue “700” of the Avengers is here and Marvel has downplayed how big of an issue is. This will set the course of the Marvel Universe for years to come and begins to answer questions set up years ago.

Avengers #10 is by Jason Aaron, Ed McGuinness, David Marquez, Frazer Irving, Adam Kubert, Andrea Sorrentino, Justin Ponsor, Erick Arciniega, Matthew Wilson, Giada Marchisio, and Cory Petit.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Black Order #1

The breakout characters from Avengers: Infinity War are getting their own limited series picking up from Avengers: No Surrender.

Written by Derek Landy, with art by Phillip Tan, ink by Marc Deering, Guillermo Ortega, Le Beau Underwood, color by Jay David Ramos, and lettering by VC’ Clayton Cowles, the villains take the spotlight!

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

The Avengers #10 (Marvel) – Marvel has underplayed this issue which marks the 700th of the Avengers. So much goes down here, it’ll set the direction for the Marvel Universe for quite some time.

Bitter Root #1 (Image Comics) – A spin on the horror genre, the first issue messes with tropes and we can’t wait to see where it all goes.

Bloodshot: Rising Spirit #1 (Valiant Entertainment) – An origin to the popular character, who will soon have his own movie. This seems like it’ll be a solid jumping on point to check out the hype.

Captain America #5 (Marvel) – Ta-Nehisi Coates doing Captain America a nd every issue has been amazing so far. A perfect blend of action, continuity, and politics.

Comics Comics Quarterly #1 (SBI Press) – An amazing group of comics… write comics!

Electric Warriors #1 (DC Comics) – A limited series that takes us to an unexplored timeline, the Cosmic Dark Age! What?! Yeah, we’re excited to find out.

Firefly #1 (BOOM! Studios) – The cult television show comes to comics with a new publisher and explores the history of the universe. A must for Browncoats.

Mister Miracle #12 (DC Comics) – The epic mini-series wraps up and after last issue, we’re beyond excited to see where it goes.

Transformers: Unicron #6 (IDW Publishing) – This is it, years of Transformers comics wrap up. Who will stand and who will fall and what’s next? We can’t wait to find out.

Uncanny X-Men #1 (Marvel) – The X line kicks off from here with this weekly event and a return of the classic title.

The Unstoppable Wasp #2 (Marvel) – The first issue felt like the return of an old friend and we’re excited to read more of this beyond fun series.

William Gibson’s Alien 3 #1 (Dark Horse) – The unused script for Alien 3 by William Gibson gets turned into a comic. Hell yes!

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