Tag Archives: eber ferreira

We Live

Preview: Task Force Z #9

Task Force Z #9

(W) Matthew Rosenberg (A) Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira
In Shops: Jun 28, 2022
SRP: $3.99

Are we the baddies? After the shocking (but not really) betrayal by Mr. Bloom, the new Task Force Z are public enemy number one. All of Gotham is hunting for them. They are out of money, out of friends, and out of Lazarus Resin. But now they will have to face their most dangerous foe yet-and it’s one of their own!

Task Force Z #9

Preview: Task Force Z #8

Task Force Z #8

(W) Matthew Rosenberg (A) Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira
In Shops: May 24, 2022
SRP: $3.99

All-new team! Same old problems! After losing everything, Task Force Z has finally discovered who their real enemy is. Jason and his team are on the run, underpowered, and outgunned. But everyone knew this was really just a Suicide Squad when they signed up, right? One way or another, they are going to finish this. Only one thing stands in their way…but that one thing happens to be the Bat-Family.

Task Force Z #8

Preview: Task Force Z #7

Task Force Z #7

(W) Matthew Rosenberg (A) Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira
In Shops: May 03, 2022
SRP: $3.99

Solomon Grundy. Victor Zsasz. Madame Crow. Copperhead. No, these are not this year’s nominees for sexiest maniac alive…they are the new recruits for Task Force Z! What does this mean for Red Hood and Bane? Will Mr. Bloom’s Lazarus Resin heist spell certain doom for the Resurrection Twins? How many rhetorical questions can I possibly squeeze into one paragraph’s worth of copy? 1) A lot. 2) Yes. 3) Three.

Task Force Z #7

Preview: Task Force Z #7

Task Force Z #7

(W) Matthew Rosenberg (A) Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira
In Shops: May 03, 2022
SRP: $3.99

Solomon Grundy. Victor Zsasz. Madame Crow. Copperhead. No, these are not this year’s nominees for sexiest maniac alive…they are the new recruits for Task Force Z! What does this mean for Red Hood and Bane? Will Mr. Bloom’s Lazarus Resin heist spell certain doom for the Resurrection Twins? How many rhetorical questions can I possibly squeeze into one paragraph’s worth of copy? 1) A lot. 2) Yes. 3) Three.

Task Force Z #7

Preview: Task Force Z #5

Task Force Z #5

(W) Matthew Rosenberg
(A) Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira

Heads? Everyone gets eaten by a zombie. Tails? Aw, who am I kidding…everyone’s going to get eaten by a zombie. It’s always a trick question when Two-Face is involved…and Harvey Dent’s role in this whole zombie Suicide Squad thing (zombicide? Is this a Zombicide Zquad?) is a whole lot weirder than you think it is. Or maybe not, I don’t know you. What are you still reading this solicit for? Get out there and read Task Force Z!

Task Force Z #5

Review: Task Force Z #3

Task Force Z #3

Task Force Z has been a surprising comic for me. I went in not knowing much about it and thought it was some other “Elseworlds” type story. Then, figuring it out, the concept of a “zombie” Suicide Squad sounded rather silly. But, with each issue, the series just grows in depth and how much of it is focused on the characters and morality of what’s going on. Task Force Z #3 is a perfect example of that.

Matthew Rosenberg is delivering a series that’s so much better than its rather silly sounding concept. A mysterious organization is raising dead Batman villains using Lazarus resin. To lead this squad, they’ve recruited Jason Todd, aka Red Hood. With villains like Mr. Bloom, Man-Bat, and Bane by his side, Todd has struggled with the whole concept and “humanity” of what’s being done and trying to not be eaten by his squad. There’s been a great balance of action, humor, and horror with each issue. And at its center is the mystery of who’s really calling the shots.

Task Force Z #3 hits all of the major notes as Jason continues to struggle with the concept and makes some demands if things are to continue. There’s also a new mission, a new teammate, and a moment to bond with one team member. It all shows this is a series that cares as much about its characters and their development as it does the action. It also answers who the mysterious voice behind the team really is… and it honestly surprised me a lot.

Eddy Barrows‘ art continues to impress. Barrows is joined by Eber Ferreira on ink, Adriano Lucas on color, and Rob Leigh on lettering. The series has done an amazing job of balancing its traditional superhero action with its horror aspects. The small details make each issue stand apart as we can see where things stand with each character based on their state of decay. It makes you get really engrossed picking out how back to normal a character is and what danger lurks. It’s a small thing that really makes the series. Then add in the action which almost has a dramatic flair about it. Take for instance the end of this particular mission and Red Hood’s actions. It’s a flow from the action but has a moment that lingers and moves Red Hood along as a character. The way Jason stands and how the panels move along are amazing storytelling that ties in everything that makes comics special.

Task Force Z #3 is a fantastic issue with an amazing mix of character development, action, and shocking moments. This issue brings so much together and feels like a major moment in an event before the series wraps up. Where this is going next is unknown but it’s a ride I can’t wait to see more of.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg Art: Eddy Barrows
Ink: Eber Ferreira Color: Adriano Lucas Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Task Force Z #1

Task Force Z #1

There’s something a bit silly about the concept of Task Force Z but at the same time it all works so well. The concept is simple, A-Day resulted in the death of numerous criminals in Arkham Asylum. Now, those criminals have been resurrected and forced on a team, much like the Suicide Squad. It’s the Suicide Squad with pseudo zombies. The comic is also completely self-aware and has a lot of fun with its concept acknowledging how crazy the idea is.

Written by Matthew Rosenberg, Task Force Z #1 lays out the insane concept putting everything on the table. We know the “how” of it all, we sort of know the “who” of it, and kind of know the “why” of it too. Led by Jason Todd, aka Red Hood, the initial team features Bane, Man-Bat, and eventually Arkham Knight, and Mr. Bloom. The last of which is an unexpected character who stands out showing off so much personality in their back and forth with Todd.

The issue is really solid though. Rosenberg keeps the familiar of Suicide Squad but enough of a spin on it to make it interesting. The spin is the “how” and Jason Todd’s reaction to it all. It’s a silly concept when you think about it and Todd seems to recognize that. He’s dealing with “zombie” villains in a situation that has them taking down other villains and the absurdity of it all isn’t lost on him. His reactions and lines are funny adding to the enjoyment of the debut. But, Rosenberg also gives him some humanity showing off his unease of it all. One particular moment has Todd being the voice of reason, a role we don’t associate with him and in that moment a lot is added to the character and the seires.

Task Force Z #1 also has a bit of old-school horror to it all. The end of the comic especially delivers a tense moment that is left hanging and really plays off the concepts of zombies and horror films of the past. Again, it adds to the fun, campy, pulp aspect of it.

The art by Eddy Barrows is great. Along with ink by Eber Ferreira, color by Adriano Lucas, and lettering by Rob Leigh, the comic is “dark” adding to the atmosphere and concept but never crosses a line into scary. Yes the villains are zombies but the comic never really goes for the gross out factor of decay. There’s some small moments here and there and details as well that makes it all clear but where the comic could easily go over the top with decaying villains, it hasn’t yet. Instead, it plays it somewhat serious in a way adding to the grounded aspect and making the comic feel visually like it fits into the world of Batman.

Task Force Z #1 is a debut that does an excellent job of playing off of the current meta story going on in the world of Batman. While “Fear State” isn’t present, it does build off of the launch of the new line’s narrative and has some fun with the possibilities that sets up. Overall, it’s an unexpected debut that’s both serious and camp at the same time and leaves us wanting more. Task Force Z #1 feels a bit like old-school EC Comics at times and never takes itself too seriously.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg Art: Eddy Barrows
Ink: Eber Ferreira Color: Adriano Lucas Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE comic for a review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Need to Deal with Zombie Villains? Unleash Task Force Z!

This October, Task Force Z is unleashed written by Matthew Rosenberg with art by Eddy Barrows and inks by Eber Ferreira.

On A-Day, hundreds of Gotham City’s most dangerous and deranged criminals were left dead after an attack on Arkham Asylum and now, they’re getting a second chance at life. A mysterious benefactor is bringing together a new Task Force and has recruited the only person who could lead them, someone who knows what it’s like to come back from a brutal death: Red Hood. Now Jason Todd has to unravel the mystery surrounding this team of the recently deceased while leading a line-up of some of Gotham City’s worst criminals who’ve ever lived: Bane. Man-Bat. The Arkham Knight. Sundowner. Mr. Bloom.

Coming October 26, 2021, Task Force Z #1 also features a variant by Tyler Kirkham, 1:25 variant by Dan Mora, retailer team variant by Rodolfo Migliari, 1:50 Arkham Knight variant by Kyle Hotz, and 1:100 Mono-chrome variant by Hotz.

  • Task Force Z #1

The Inkwell Awards has announced the winners of its 14th annual awards for excellence

Inkwell Awards

The Inkwell Awards has announced the winners of its 14th annual awards for excellence in the comic-book inking art form. Results are normally first made public at its live awards ceremony during its host show, The Great Philadelphia Comic Con, but at present, due to uncertainties with the Covid-19 pandemic, the show status is unknown and the ceremony is canceled.

Nominees were chosen by a separate and independent nomination committee on their own as well as from artist submissions. Voting by professionals and fans took place for one week in March on the official ballot at the non-profit advocacy’s website. After 1587 ballots were tallied, one winner was chosen in each of five categories based on printed American interior comic-book work cover-dated 2020.

As begun last year, the Inkwells’ internal committee chose to not limit lifetime achievement awards within a given year. They selected four inductees for the annual Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame and three recipients for the Stacey Aragon Special Recognition Award (SASRA). There were no internal Silver Inkwell Awards recipients this year but there were two internal Above & Beyond Awards given to Bob Bretall and Johnny B. Gerardy for 10 years of Nomination Committee service.

Ballot nominees are listed below with their credits and the percentage of votes received by the winners, along with the other nominees in alphabetical order.

  • FAVORITE INKER (Favorite ink artist over the pencil work of another artist; cannot also be nominated for the “Props” award): Ruy Jose (41%) (Immortal Hulk [Marvel]).
    Other nominees: Jonathan Glapion, Klaus Janson, Joe Prado.
  • MOST-ADAPTABLE (Artist showing exceptional ink style versatility over other pencillers): Norm Rapmund (42%) (Batman Beyond, Detective Comics, The Flash, Flash Forward, Dark Nights Death Metal: The Multiverse Who Laughs (one-shot), Wonder Woman [DC]).
    Other nominees: Marc Deering, Daniel Henriques, Matt Santorelli, LeBeau Underwood.
  • PROPS (Inker deserving of more attention): Eber Ferreira (41%) (Speed Metal (one-shot), Freedom Fighters, Justice League [DC]).
    Other nominees: Adriano Di Benedetto, Daniel Henriques, Le Beau Underwood.
  • S.P.A.M.I. (Small Press And Mainstream Independent): Adelso Corona (69%) Snake Eyes [IDW]; Bloodshot [Valiant]).Other nominees: Le Beau Underwood.
  • ALL-IN-ONE (Favorite artist known for inking his/her own pencils): Chris Samnee (40%) (FirePower [Image]).
    Other nominees: Marco Santucci, Liam Sharp.

In alphabetical order, the lifetime achievement awards were as follows:

THE STACEY ARAGON SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD (SASRA): Alfredo Alcala, Frank Frazetta, and Wendy Pini.

THE JOE SINNOTT HALL OF FAME: Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito, Pablo Marcos, and Mike Royer.

Mark Sinnott, Joe’s son/agent, said, “It is an honor for me to keep with the tradition that my dad, Joltin’ Joe Sinnott started over 10 years ago. On behalf of the Inkwell Awards, I would like to welcome its four newest members to its hallowed halls: Sal Buscema, Mike Esposito, Pablo Marcos and Mike Royer. It is great to have you all as members of the Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame class of 2021. Welcome to the Inkwell family! You have all brought a great deal of talent and class to the comic book world, and we thank you for that. Keep slingin’ ink, and never let your inkwell run dry!”

Full acceptance statements from Sinnott and the winners will be found in the “Award Recipients” section of the Inkwell Awards’ website in the near future.

Review: Batman: Urban Legends #1

Batman: Urban Legends #1

As seen in The Lego Batman Movie, the Arkham video games, and the Batman comics of the 1990s and early 2000s, Batman’s strength is in the world and characters that he creates access to. Whether that’s his allies, villains, nooks and crannies of Gotham, or even police officers that he either works with or against, these personalities and settings are why I continue to return to the Batman side of the DC Universe. The creators of Batman: Urban Legends #1 understand this and flesh out different Batman-adjacent characters and even sometimes explore their relationship to the Dark Knight while also telling action, romance, and crime stories.

First up in this Gotham-themed anthology is the beginning of a six part Batman and Red Hood serial where Batman and his former protege-turned-killer vigilante (He’s switched to rubber bullets for the moment.) investigate a source of a hallucinatory street drug tackily called Cheerdrops. Writer Chip Zdarsky has a firm grasp on Jason Todd’s voice, including the darkness inside his soul and his hunger for justice, especially for Gotham’s beleaguered working class. Artists Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira and colorist Adriano Lucas nail the grit of the city with explosive linework and jagged layouts to go with a color palette that has had all the light sucked out of it. However, Excalibur’s Marcus To does the art in the flashbacks, which features brighter colors as well as simpler, cleaner lines with a more traditional superhero feel even though one of the scenes is set during “Under the Red Hood” when Jason Todd came back from the dead and started killing criminals.

“Batman and Red Hood” is also a study in contrasts in how two very different crime fighters deal with the same crisis. Batman is the World’s Greatest Detective and is super methodical with Barrows and Ferreria drawing him looking at the chemical makeup of Cheerdrops CSI-style, and his All-Star Superman-esque moment with a jumper is less feel-good and more evidence collection. On the other hand, Jason fights crime with his guts and heart and even admits in a wry line from Zdarsky that he’s not a great detective as he struggles to find a Cheerdrop stash house. However, he does find a boy named Tyler, and of course, Jason is great with kids and even lets him wear part of his mask while he looks for his dad in a dodgy part of Gotham. Zdarsky, Barrows, and Ferreira create something truly heartwarming between Jason Todd and Tyler.

There’s a throughline between this and the flashbacks where Batman (Portrayed as more of an action figure than man by To) struggles being a father figure to Jason, and Alfred does the job perfectly because he sees him as a human being and not an obstacle in his war on crime. Chip Zdarsky writes Alfred Pennyworth as the perfect parent to the Bat-family, who isn’t afraid to tell Batman that he’s full of shit and chooses compassion over a closed fist. And speaking of Batman, I love how Zdarsky doesn’t give him an inner monologue and depicts him more as a force of nature than a gun toting, broken man like Jason Todd, who agonizes over every decision and whose interaction with Tyler bring back memories of his mom who died of a drug overdose. Also, he’s not afraid to go a little dark, and Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira jagged layouts and emotional poses are along for the ride.

Batman: Urban Legends #1

The second story in Batman: Urban Legends #1 is an eight page Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy one-off from writer Stephanie Phillips, artist Laura Braga, and colorist Ivan Plascencia. Plascencia is this story’s secret weapon that shows the happy, hilarious times of Harley and Ivy’s first dates and the bleak current times for Harley as she has moved back to Gotham in her solo title and as a recurring character in Batman. Braga’s art is expressive and high energy for both the good times (Harley and Ivy smooching and snapping selfies) and bad times (A sudden bolt of lightning shattering their pictures), and she is a good fit for a story that isn’t centered around a heist or fight against a superhero, but a relationship. She and Phillips tap into the depth of feelings that Harley has for Ivy, and through some handy plant symbolism, they create hope for the relationship that has become very popular for fans in the past decade. “Harley and Ivy” is a nice, nearly slice of life oasis in the midst of the three other stories, which have more moving parts.

The third story in this comic is a 10 page “Outsiders” feature by Brandon Thomas, Max Dunbar, and Luis Guerrero starring Black Lightning, Katana, and an interesting take on Metamorpho. Thomas turns in kind of a mystery plot with the story starting with Black Lightning and an unseen Metamorpho in a Japanese prison before cutting to a bonkers, two page spread of a speedboat chase. Unlike the previous two stories in Batman: Urban Legends #1, Thomas and Dunbar go for a action over character focus, and honestly, I’m here for it. Dunbar uses arrows from their pursuers to act as eye-lines to follow the high speed chase, and he and Thomas have a clever moment or two up their sleeve, especially in regards to Metamorpho’s first appearance. The story isn’t particularly deep, but it has the vibe of a James Bond cold open with superpowers as Guerrero really makes Black Lightning’s abilities sizzle. Finally, Brandon Thomas’ plotting really kept me engaged with thinking about why characters were acting a certain way, and the the mini mystery box structure has me intrigued for the upcoming issue.

Batman: Urban Legends #1

Grifter is a character I didn’t really know a lot about except for some random comics like the New 52 Team 7 and JLA/WildCATs, but Matthew Rosenberg, Ryan Benjamin, and Antonio Fabela have made this anti-hero/rapscallion and his various pratfalls quite lovable and hilarious Batman: Urban Legends #1’s final story. Grifter is like that guy who bluffs at poker, but never has a good hand. And until maybe the penultimate page of the comic, he’s either screwing up or making a joke about it beginning with his mad rush towards supervillain fire during his Team 6 days with a lot of characters with familiar names from Wildstorm comics. (I’m not an expert on these characters, and you don’t have to be to enjoy the story.) Grifter uses his sense of humor to detract from his mediocre performance as Lucius Fox’s bodyguard or to avoid getting his ass kicked by Batman, but he also has a mystery side that is revealed when he has a “date” at one of Penguin’s bars. The mystery starts to really unfold towards the end of the comic, but Rosenberg hints at every time, he talks on a headset with what I assume is his older brother.

The comedy in “Grifter” isn’t just limited to Matthew Rosenberg’s delightfully smartass dialogue. It shows up a lot in Ryan Benjamin’s visuals, which range from G.I. Joe or Authority homages (When the superheroes clean up Team 6’s mess.) in the flashback to pure slapstick. For example, Grifter spills a drink at a party Lucius Fox is meeting a client at and spills a drink on a woman. In this situation, Benjamin doesn’t just show a simple facial expression, but throws in some growlixes and makes you know that she’s furious that the soaking wet guy in Converse and blue jeans is even in the same room with her. This playfulness extends to the fight between Batman and Grifter, which starts as a serious throwdown and ends up in a total cat and mouse situation with Grifter finally getting enough self-awareness to call it quits. However, their paths will cross, and you can tell that Batman understands he’s a wildcard with his connections to Lucius Fox, the criminal underworld, and probably those Wildstorm guys. All in all, Matthew Rosenberg, Ryan Benjamin, and Antonio Fabela turn in a hilarious action-comedy set in DC’s weirdest and (sometimes) dourest city and also slowly unveil what seems to be a master plan to merge the worlds of Wildstorm and Gotham.

Batman: Urban Legends #1 is an absolute win for the anthology format that DC Comics has been trying out with all of the four stories in the comic being entertaining and shedding light on a unique cast of characters. The longer stories that bookend the comic are especially noteworthy thanks to Chip Zdarsky’s pitch-perfect handle on the fascinating character of Jason Todd in “Batman and Red Hood” and Matthew Rosenberg and Ryan Benjamin’s skill with verbal and visual humor in “Grifter”.

Story: Chip Zdarsky, Stephanie Phillips, Brandon Thomas, Matthew Rosenberg
Art: Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, Marcus To, Laura Braga, Max Dunbar, Ryan Benjamin
Colors: Adriano Lucas, Ivan Plascencia, Luis Guerrero, Antonio Fabela
Letters: Becca Carey, Deron Bennett, Steve Wands, Saida Temofonte
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Zeismic
« Older Entries