Tag Archives: domino

Preview: Domino #6

Domino #6

(W) Gail Simone (A) Michael Shelfer (CA) Greg Land
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Sep 12, 2018
SRP: $3.99

KILLER INSTINCT CONCLUDES!
Project Armageddon wanted a Super-Soldier they could control… A weapon they could point… A trigger they could pull… Instead they got PURE CHAOS. Neena Thurman’s past collides with the present and nothing will be the same again. Don’t miss the stunning conclusion of KILLER INSTINCT!

FlameCon 2018: Writer Leah Williams Talks Emma Frost, X-Men, and More

Leah Williams is one of Marvel Comics‘ brightest and most enthusiastic new writers. Before making her Marvel debut with a Lady Hellbender story in Totally Awesome Hulk #1.MU, Williams penned the 2015 young adult novel The Alchemy of Being Fourteen. She has a story in the upcoming Domino Annual #1 as well as the X-Men Black: Emma Frost #1 one-shot drawn by Chris Bachalo, What If? Magik #1, and a yet to be announced creator owned title.

At FlameCon, I had the opportunity to chat with Leah Williams about her upcoming comics, love for the X-Men, and relationship with fictional characters, especially Emma Frost.

Graphic Policy: Let’s start with a general question. How did you become a fan of Marvel Comics, and what is kind of like your “origin story”?

Leah Williams: I am deeply entrenched in fandom culture and never really stopped once I started writing for Marvel. But the way I really got obsessed with Marvel and the X-Men comics specifically was when I first started working at a comic book shop. I worked there for maybe a year and half to two years, and in that time, I just spent all day, every day reading comics and studying them and thinking about them. It was transcendent.

GP: How has your fandom influenced your writing?

LW: For me, they’re never separated. Being active in the fandom is a way that, I think, gives me an advantage as a writer because it allows me to keep this ongoing and current knowledge of what people are saying and what they’re feeling and where there’s a lack of their favorite character and the kind of stories they’d like to see.

GP: Most of your books for Marvel so far have involved the X-Men corner of the universe. What draws you to the mutant side of the Marvel U?

LW: What I find most fascinating about X-Men comics is how flawed they are. It’s the same thing that draws me towards Peter Parker as well. The fact that they make mistakes, and they learn from those mistakes, but they’re always trying to do better. They don’t come out the gate being correct and right in every decision that they make. And I think that it’s seeing those kind of flaws in our heroes that makes them more compelling because it does humanize them.

With mutants, in particular, my obsession largely spawns from the fact that you have characters like Beak or Maggott or the gross mutants, who in a different body of work would exemplify genre conventions of body horror. They’re disfigured and grotesque in other works. But because they’re mutants in X-Men comics, they get to be the heroes. Their disfigurement or what would inhibit them in a different genre is their power. I roll hard for that. I think it’s great.

GP: So the X-Men have been used a metaphor for LGBTQ themes since at least the 1980s. How have your experiences as a bisexual woman set apart your writing of the X-Men versus a straight person writing them?

LW: I can tell there’s a difference in what I bring to the table as a writer and as a bisexual woman than the existing canon. For example, the way I depict different characters is informed by different life experiences. That’s true of all the Big Two comics in general. As characters get handed off down the line, when they pass hands, they take on new qualities and different aspects. So, I’m excited to be part of the fresh blood at Marvel now when we’re getting to do some really exciting stuff. It’s just thrilling.

GP: Speaking of exciting stuff, you have an Emma Frost one-shot coming up. It’s part of X-Men Black, which is focusing on the villains. Do you consider Emma Frost to be a hero, villain, or antihero, and why?

LW: I think she exists in a moral grey area. To me, I’m a flagrant Emma Frost apologist. She can do no wrong, including blowing up [Firestar’s] pony. She had her reasons. At the same time, she has this brutal heart, and she’s deeply compassionate, radically so. That’s what informs her actions. All she ever wanted to be was a school teacher, and people often forget that about her. It’s one of those things where she’s not bad, she’s just drawn that way.

Being able to tell a story with her is (I don’t know how to do a sports metaphor.) that I picked up the ball and ran as far as I could with it. And it’s deeply exciting.

GP: So what can fans expect from your Emma Frost story?

LW: It’s a love letter to Emma Frost. It is going to be cathartic, and it’s going to show Emma at her best.

GP: What has been collaborating with artist Chris Bachalo been like?

LW:  He is amazing and so humble. When my editor Jordan D. White said that he had a line on a good artist, I replied by sending him a whole bunch of “eyes” emojis. Then he was like, “Are you sitting down?”

I was, but when he told me it was Chris Bachalo, I burst into tears and had to go lay down and breathe for a minute. It was during the time when we were outlining, but then I started to see the script come alive in Chris’ style and artistic voice because his work is so meaningful to me. It is so formative. Working with him has been incredible. He’s very kind and an all around awesome guy.

GP: You also have a story in the Domino Annual coming up. I really enjoyed your Domino and Emma Frost story in Secret Empire: Brave New World. There’s a line in there I still remember, “Being a hot girl is weird.”

LW: That’s another thing. In each script, there’s something where I think there’s no way they’re going to let me get away with it, but they do. It was that line, and it was super exciting.

GP: Do you play off that line of dialogue at all in your new story at all?

LW: It’s a part of her character because Domino is open about these things. She’s playful. She’s flirty. The Domino Annual is going to be very exciting because there’s a sexiness to it. While she doesn’t talk about the reality of being that insanely hot, you still get to see her in these different scenarios and different outfits and running around town getting stuff done.

GP: That sounds like a lot of fun. You’re also a doing a Magik What If? story. What attracts you to writing characters that people might consider to be morally flawed or antiheroes? I kind of sense a theme in your upcoming works.

LW: I roll hard for female characters who I don’t think are getting their due and need to be developed so much more. I was actually approached to write the Illyana Rasputin one-shot by my editor Annalise Bissa, who is amazing and a huge fan of the character. In her words that she straight up put in the actual press release, Illyana deserves better. That’s what were doing in the one-shot to show the world where she never joined the New Mutants. It’s when she gets out of Limbo and never joined the New Mutants.

GP: What have been some of the challenges of creating your own reality in this story because Marvel does the different Earth designations for the What If stories?

LW: Specifically, with [Magik], we had to think about kind of long term consequences because it becomes a butterfly effect. We change this in this world, well, how will it effect different kinds of things? We had to account for readers’ questions they would have while reading it and try to anticipate the questions they would have and answer them proactively so we could get on with the worldbuilding of this different universe. It’s a very practical technique. It’s a logistical thing.

GP: Do you have any favorite What If? stories from the past?

LW: I can’t think of anything specifically off the top of my head, but have you ever read the What The–?! stories?

GP: Yeah, when Marvel was making fun of their own stuff MAD Magazine style.

LW: Jordan D. White just introduced me to those, and that’s my current obsession. They’re super goofy. And there’s this panel where Angel is strapping down his massive eight foot wings to his body. And he’s like, “This’ll be fine. No one will notice this when I go out.” Then, you see him put on a jacket and walking out, and he’s got like camel humps under his jacket that are taller than his head. It’s the funniest thing.

GP: Most of your comics for Marvel have been one shots. What has been a challenge of doing this versus a miniseries or an ongoing?

LW: It’s all been fun so far. It’s all been wildly thrilling. The backup story “Super Hot” in Secret Empire Brave New World  had its own challenges because it was four pages. Working with those kind of constraints has the same kind of exhilaration as completing an obstacle course where if you can pay respect to continuity, represent the characters authentically, have all the necessary plot elements you need to have in there, and make it visually appealing and compelling in four pages that’s an adrenaline rush to let off.

The most difficult thing, for me, that I’ve worked on is the Emma Frost one-shot because working on it was terrifying. From the moment Jordan D. White asked me to write it, I knew what was at stake and how incredible it was. While I was writing it, I was terrified the whole time because it was the first time I realized that loving a character is not enough. Being a fan of a character is not enough. You write these stories. You have to stay the course. You have to stay true to your outline, and that kind of thing.

The reason why it was scary for me during the Emma Frost is there is nothing rational about the way I feel about Emma Frost. It is a blind devotion, and realizing that while I was writing her was so scary. I was like, “I’m gonna fuck this up.” I’m gonna mess this up so bad, and they’re never gonna let me do it again.

At the same time, I felt honor bound as someone who loves her so much to do as much with her as I could in the space I had available. God bless Jordan D. White, he’s letting me.

GP: When did you fall in love with her? When did you know that Emma Frost would be so influential to you?

LW: I honestly don’t know. It’s been a long time coming for sure. It’s gotten really pronounced in the last few years, I’m not sure why. I’ve always had a respect for her, but it didn’t become irrational and crazy until I had started writing for Marvel a couple years ago and was doing a lot of research. I read her origin story and read the solo miniseries.

GP: With the terrible covers.

LW: Listen, they’re Trojan horses. People give comic covers a lot of shit for being male gaze-y. You gotta keep in mind they’re Trojan horses.

GP: I like that because people have been talking about the J. Scott Campbell cover for your one-shot.

LW: Exactly. People are gonna pick up this book who don’t know anything about Emma Frost and are picking it up because she looks sexy on the cover. But what you’re gonna get is an intense character study.

So, it was reading the original solo miniseries with her and learning her background and how she set out on her own, the tragic family dynamic, and she was a stripper. All of it. I love it.

GP: I have one last question. You’ve teased about doing creator owned work. Do you have any more info on that?

LW: The only thing I can do is build mystery hype about it because it hasn’t been announced yet. I am working on my first original comics series, and I am calling it X-Files, but lesbians and magic. It’s cyberpunk, neo-noir in an island setting. It’s one of the most wildly indulgent projects I’ve ever worked on.

You can find Leah Williams on her website.

Follow Leah on Twitter.

Gail Simone, Fabian Nicieza and More Bring You Domino Annual #1!

Because you demanded it! The runaway success of Domino’s solo series has had fans and retailers clamoring for more stories in her world, and readers have fallen in love Neena Thurman all over again!

This September, Marvel has assembled an all-star team to chronicle her adventures! Acclaimed series writer Gail Simone is joined by a host of superstar creators, including Deadpool co-creator Fabian Nicieza, Dennis Hopeless, and Leah Williams, to bring you new and exciting adventures featuring everyone’s favorite femme fatale – with art by Victor Ibanez, Juan Gedeon, Natacha Bustos, Leonard Kirk, and more!

But that’s not all! Cable and Colossus, two of Domino’s most requested ex-flames make a return – but one reunion will prove to be bittersweet. Find out which this September, when Domino Annual #1 hits comic shops! The issue is out September 26th with a cover by Greg Land.

X-Force’s Domino Joins Marvel Contest of Champions!

On Kabam’s popular mobile fighting game Marvel Contest of Champions, Domino from the mercenary group X-Force has officially entered the contest!

Neena Thurman a.k.a. Domino is the lucky result of an unlucky government weapons program designed to breed the perfect weapon. After escaping a top-secret facility with her mother, she honed her Mutant ability to manipulate probabilities and joined the mercenary group known as X-Force.

You can find Domino’s abilities and stats online.

Review: Domino #1 and #2

Gail Simone is one of my absolute favorite contemporary comics writers and Domino is peak Gail Simone.

This brand new solo series starring the former X-Force character, Domino is laden with tough ladies, genuinely funny humor, messy people with issues making believably bad choices, and Runaways references (the band, not the superhero team).

Our protagonist, Neena Thurman aka Domino is a hard living super powered mercenary with a heart of gold and concealing some highly compartmentalized past trauma. After nailing just that sort of character writing the beloved cult favorite Secret Six series for DC Comics, having Simone return to Marvel to write Domino’s first solo series was a perfect fit.

The pre-New 52 incarnation of Secret Six was some of the best cape comics of this century. Simone has stretched her wings in a number of different directions since including creator owned work like the psychological horror of The Clean Room and licensed work like her Tomb Raider series that was more heart-pounding than it had any right to be. But good as it was, none of that scratched my itch for Secret Six. Domino feels more like a return to form from Simone than anything I’ve read for a long time and it’s exactly what I was hoping for.

Gail does an amazing job introducing the characters’ powers in the first issue. Domino’s teammates here are pretty minor characters but Simone is the expert at making us care about random D-listers and this continues that storied legacy.

Simone even introduces some complex issues like mutants with pretty privilege or mutants with passing privilege. Domino is an interesting character in terms of privilege: her probability altering “good luck powers” are a security blanket. You can’t kill her, but she sure as hell can feel pain in the process of surviving.

She’s beautiful. But she’s a mutant, subject to discrimination and bigotry. She can’t blend in with the crowd — her skin is white as a sheet and one of her eyes has a black dot that was, unknown to me previously, forcibly tattooed onto her face. The story starts to delve into the social implications of her particular combinations of identities and appearance.

The art by David Baldeón is rubbery and well suited to humorous scenes, especially his expressive faces. Unfortunately it follows the standard pitfall of cookie cutter depictions of women’s bodies and proportions. The good news is Domino’s outfits are refreshingly in character. Her combat gear is reasonably practical, her street clothes are attractive and echo her black and white color scheme.

And maybe I can imagine Renegade going into a fight against bad guys pants-less and wearing a leather halter bustier. Maybe. But it still feels like the art is doing that to serve some basic bro desires rather than serving the good of the story.

Clayton Cowles‘ letters always offer perfect emphasis and clarity. Jesus Aburtov’s colors are crisp and focus on Domino’s color themes. Maybe someday the gods of comics will see to set us free from the plague of Greg Land tacky, traced covers of cloned women currently plaguing many of my favorite creators, undermining their feminist content. But today is not that day.

Also there’s a cute dog. Cute dogs have become a hallmark of Marvel’s solo comics about grown ass ladies (we miss you Mockingbird!)

I’m totally cool with a trend that cute.

Preview: Domino #2

Domino #2

(W) Gail Simone (A) David Baldeon (CA) Greg Land
Parental Advisory
In Shops: May 09, 2018
SRP: $3.99

UNLUCKY STARS
• Marvel’s #1 soldier of fortune’s luck has finally gone south… turning her life as a mercenary upside down!
• Plus: Who is Domino’s evil counterpart?
• Guest-starring AMADEUS CHO!

Review: X-Men: Domino

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Domino!

X-Men: Domino collects Domino (1997) #1-3, Domino (2003) #1-4, X-Force: Sex and Violence #1-3, material from X-Force & Cable Annual ’95, A+X #10, and Uncanny X-Men Annual (2016) #1 by Ben Raab, Joe Pruett, Brian Stelfreeze, Craig Kyle, Christopher Yost, Todd Dezago, Adam Warren, Anthony Piper, David Perrin, Gabrielle Dell’Otto, and Daerick Gross.

Get your copy in comic shops and in book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

Marvel​ provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Around the Tubes

It’s a new week! We’ve still got convention coverage coming plus some celebrations of Superman! Lots to come this week and while you wait, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Kotaku – A Lot Of Work Goes Into Adding Just One Suit To Spider-Man – Some interesting info.

The Beat – Nobody Sells Marvel Digital Trade Paperbacks For List Price – Shocked. Shocked we say!

The Comichron – 25 years ago: Superman rises from the dead — and sparks the biggest month in comics history – Some comic history!

 

Reviews

Comic Attack – Domino #1

Talking Comics – The Immortal Men #1

Talking Comics – Snotgirl #10

Review: Domino #1

Impossible curves. Impossible shots. Impossible targets. Marvel’s #1 soldier of fortune is back in an explosive new ongoing series! The product of a failed super-soldier program, Neena Thurman always made her own luck as the sharpshooting mercenary known as Domino… but what happens when her own powers betray her? The hunter becomes the hunted as every mercenary in the game smells blood in the water!

Domino has always been a character that I’ve enjoyed in comics and felt while there’s been highlights, she’s never quite got the justice, or depth, she deserved. Now, writer Gail Simone is taking on this rather lucky mutant in a new series and is doing just that. Domino #1 mixes action with laughs and some depth (in a few ways).

I haven’t read everything she’s been in but it always felt like Domino was defined by her powers and her looks. Simone seems to recognize that in some ways and does so without beating around the bush. She’s good looking and her mutant powers can be cool. But, how did she get that eye tattoo? Are her powers really that good? Simone begins to explore all of that in this first issue that delivers Neena the person as well as Neena the mercenary. She does all that while also delivering some fun by letting Domino lower her inhibitions and let her hair down so to speak.

Artist David Baldeón and colorist Jesus Aburtov help things out with a mix of action, sexy, and humor throughout the comic. The art team seem to be in sync with Simone that this is a character that’s more than eye candy. There’s a lot of humor here, physical humor through images, and there’s some not so flattering moments as well. There’s a lot of characters packed in here and they all look great. Solid combo of writer and artist.

I wasn’t sure what I was expecting but this is a fantastic start to the series that shows that there’s a lot more to Domino than her looks and powers. I’m all in for the series and can’t wait to see what Simone and team have in store next.

Story: Gail Simone Art: David Baldeón
Color: Jesus Aburtov Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Cover: Greg Land, Frank D’Armata
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: Bloodshot Salvation #8 (Valiant) – After the ambitious issue told from Bloodshot’s point of view where you saw what he saw (only he was blind s we got a black comic with the only art on the pages being in the form of the panel borders), I’m really interested to see how Lemire follows that up. While I have no doubt this will be a really good comic, there is precedence after all, I’m curious to see how it stands up after #7 – a comic that I feel is incredible.

Ninja-K #6 (Valiant) – In any other week this would be on top of my Most Wanted list. In fact there’s such a gulf between this and the next that I didn’t bother to write it down. Why bother, really?

 

Joe

Top Pick: Oblivion Song #2 (Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment) – A new series is always exciting, and when Kirkman creates a new universe, it’s even more exciting. After a set up issue, it will be great to see what this world has in store. This is a solid pick for fans of sci-fi dystopian tales.

Gideon Falls #2 (Image Comics) – Another new series from a great writer, Lemire. I enjoyed the tone of the first issue, even if it did make me a little anxious. This is one freaky little town. Great for fans of horror.

The Avengers #688 (Marvel) – This train keeps rolling! The elders are coming to their endgame and each week this book juggles so many characters and does it effectively. This could become a classic Avengers tale.

X-Men Red #3 (Marvel) – Jean Grey has returned and with her comes a new team. This book deals with old school X-book themes like racism and mutants, and how they fit into the world of humanity. The first two issues have been good.

Captain America #700 (Marvel) – Waid’s time on the book is coming to a close, and Coates is beginning his run soon. This is a landmark issue and the end of a time travel arc that has been fun. It’s classic Captain America and the end of a run that acts as a palate cleanser to Hydra-Cap.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Dodge City #2 (BOOM! Studios) – This is a week with lots of solid new releases and fantastic comics coming out so to narrow them down to five is a tough one. That being said, this is a comic that’s on the top of my pile to read. The first issue was cute, entertaining, just a lot of fun. A comic about dodge ball? Yeah, I’m sold.

Big Planet Comics Red (Big Planet/Retrofit Comics) – An anthology featuring 15 artists from the DMV (Washington DC, Maryland, and Virginia). This publisher consistently puts out amazing indie comics.

Crude #1 (Image Comics/Skybound Entertainment) – I read this first issue and it’s a gut punch of a story. Boiled down, it’s a revenge story, but the details, the setting, it’s just a raw and gritty comic that’s so good.

Domino #1 (Marvel) – Gail Simone writing Domino. Nuff said.

Exiles #1 (Marvel) – While I haven’t been a fan of this series in the past, the fact writer Saladin Ahmed is handling this volume has me excited.

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