Tag Archives: comixology originals

ComiXology Original Elephantmen 2261 Season 3 Goes Documentary

Are you ready for the Elephantmen documentary? It’s coming your way—in Season 3 of the acclaimed comic book series written by Richard Starkings, with art by Axel Medellin, featuring covers by Boo Cook. Available from comiXology OriginalsElephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen debuts on July 7, 2020.

In Elephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen, British documentarian, Theo Laroux is making a documentary about the Elephantmen. Laroux arrives in California to begin interviews. He seeks out SKYCAB driver Miki in an effort to understand her apparent infatuation with one of the more well-known Elephantmen, Hip Flask and asks for her help in making the introduction to his first subject: LAPD Lieutenant Trench. Trench is a no nonsense, one-eyed zebra/human hybrid who takes him on a ridealong on the darker side of Los Angeles, 2261. But has Laroux unwittingly stumbled upon another story with much broader implications for all the Elephantmen?

Elephantmen 2261 is available upon release, at no additional cost, for members of Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited, and comiXology Unlimited, and for purchase on Kindle and comiXology. Prime Reading offers all Amazon Prime members a rotating selection of over a thousand top Kindle books, magazines, short works, comic books, children’s books, and more – all at no additional cost. Kindle Unlimited offers over 1 million titles, thousands of audiobooks, and select current issues of popular magazines for just $9.99 a month with a 60-day free trial. ComiXology Unlimited now offers over 25,000 comics, graphic novels and manga for just $5.99 a month with a 60-day free trial.

Elephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 6/6

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Aggretsuko #3 (Oni Press) – In Aggretsuko #3, a staff member (Fittingly named Karen.) from the company’s Canada office visits Retsuko’s job in Japan to see why their employees scored so low on a moral survey and to increase “workflow synergy”. Writer/artist Brenda Hickey expertly satirizes corporate speak, sticky notes, and outside consultants who babysit you all day so that you get no work done. However, as the story progresses, Hickey fleshes out the character of Karen and finds out that she and Retsuko have a lot in common, and she takes some of her feedback to not jump down everyone’s throats. This comic is cathartic for anyone who has had a terrible boss that has made them to do tasks unrelated to their job, and Hickey’s art has a great energy that fits into the show’s aesthetic. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Youth #4 (Comixology Originals) – Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cuniffe’s Youth wraps up with a bit of a bang and a bit of a whimper. Even though he’s a Nick Fury expy, Youth #4 shows how much a badass Thunder is as he survives being gutted by one of the posthumans and returns to wreak vengeance. This fits in with Diotto and Cunniffe’s visceral approach to superpowers with abilities having intense bodily effects on both their users and recipients. Probably, the best part of this comic is showing how River and Frank met and a conversation that shows that they really care about each other. There’s a bit of symbolism to one of the character’s names. The bad part of this comic is that the story and final battle feels rushed, and I feel like I don’t know the characters beyond River and Frank. Pires quickly adds powers to wrap up the story/set up the new one and superhero cliches like a secret hideout instead of subverting them. Frank does get some funny lines roasting his friends’ attempts at starting a super-team. It really seems like a story device to extend the run of the comic/upcoming Amazon Prime TV show instead of something organic and naturalistic. Overall: 6.8 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Today’s New Digital Comics is Filled with New DC and Manga

Youth #4

Check out today’s new digital comic releases available on comiXology. There’s 58 new comics debuting this morning from DC, Seven Seas, VIZ Media, Yen Press, and more!

There’s a bit of something for everyone all available at your fingertips. Check out the full list on their site or check out individual issues below.

Andrews McMeel

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Kodansha

Medibang

Nihonbungeisha

Printemps Publishing

Scholastic Graphix

Seven Seas

VIZ Media

Yen Press


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 5/30

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Joe Hesh

Batman: The Adventures Continue #3 (DC Digital) After a good first two issues that took me down memory lane, this one was more like an overstayed welcome. Sure I love Robin and Deathstroke as characters but this was incredibly bland. Three quarters of the issue take place inside a museum where Robin and Slade are waiting to foil Firefly’s latest heist. We all know that Slade is playing Robin to get to Bruce but it is an incredibly dull journey getting there this time. The only highlight of the issue is when Bruce is bringing down Mad Hatter and his Wonderland Gang and he thinking to himself how Tim would have enjoyed it and he’s actually missing his quips. That was a nice touch. Ty Templeton does great visuals here and it could have leapt off the animation cells themselves but the writing from Alan Burnett and Paul Dini (I can’t believe I’m writing this) really fails to connect here. Hoping next issue this picks up the pace major. It is a limited series and we’ve got so much to get to. Just get to Jason Todd and Asrael already! I digress. Score: 6.5

Venom #25 (Marvel Comics) These days anything writer Donny Cates touches turns to gold right? Welllll, and anything my childhood artist Mark Bagley turns out is amazing right? Welllll, not quite. Now mind you the whole Venom run and Venom Island has been awesome thus far but this issue just fell flat. You would think with no new comics for two months and a big return could do no wrong. For me though it just wasn’t it. First off the whole issue is told via flashback which is a device I am not very fond of. Especially as the conclusion to a huge epic! However it’s not all bad. We have great art by Bagley but the script just wasn’t energetic enough. Venom vs Carnage final bow on the island. It was cool and all I just wanted more. I do like Eddie’s involvement with the Avengers though. Plus we are warned about the coming of Knull which should be some good shit. Score: 7.6

Logan

Youth #3 (Comixology Originals) Youth #3 is kind of a messy comic opening up with an extended conversation from a redshirt security guard about how he hates pregnant women and the effects of Five Guys on his digestive system. Ok, Curt Pires, we understand you think you’re like Quentin Tarantino. However, once he and artists Alex Diotto and Dee Cunniffe focus on the effects of having superpowers on the cast and especially the relationship between Franklin and River, the book gets good again. Pires and Diotto show these teens don’t give a shit about superheroes, but use their abilities to get money and party, consequences be damned. I especially like the cut-up panels and day glo colors that Diotto and Cunniffe bring to the club sequence, which starts fun and turns grotesque. I wish I knew more about these characters other than general anger and horniness, but Youth #3 is a marked improvement over the previous issue if not a great issue just yet. Overall: 7.6 Verdict: Read

Marauders #10 (Marvel) Forge’s anti-mutant tech has fallen into the hands of the Russians, and it’s up to the Marauders to stop them in this action-packed, nearly standalone story from Gerry Duggan, Stefano Caselli, and Edgar Delgado. Casselli’s art isn’t flashy, but it’s easy to follow especially during the big action sequence. Emma Frost gets to use both her womanly intuition and psychic abilities in a dramatic scene that comes across at revenge for what happens to Kate Pryde. Because of these actions, Krakoa isn’t afraid to do some more overt action instead of just relying on X-Force. And there’s also developments on that front with Duggan including two of the saddest diagram pages yet: a couple of last emails between Kate and Nightcrawler. Overall: 8.3 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

ComiXology has 66 new Digital Comics For You Today from DC and more!

Youth #3

ComiXology has your hookup with new digital comics today with 66 comics including new ones from DC, manga, and more! Get the scoop below as to what’s available at your fingertips now!

comiXology Original

DC Comics

Batman: Gotham Nights #6

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Kodansha

Seven Seas

VIZ Media

Yen Press

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 5/23

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Youth #2 (Comixology Originals)– Curt Pires goes hogwild on the cliches (Eternal struggle between good and evil, government secret squad) and definitely tips his hand that the Amazon-greenlit Youth is the streaming service’s answer to Stranger Things or I’m Not Okay With This as our murder telekinesis makes her appearance. Alex Diotto and Dee Cunniffe’s visuals keep this from being totally derivative like their grotesque take on telekinesis and a gorgeous, silent film prologue on how the main cast got their superpowers. Pires also lays down some interesting, if well-trodden philosophy in this opening scene: are humans (and metahumans by extension) are product of design or chance? Hopefully, we get to know Youth’s cast beyond just their powers in the next couple issues, or maybe this comic was just a four issue outline for an TV series. Overall: 6.0 Verdict: Read

Lost on Planet Earth #2 (Comixology Originals)– Magdalene Visaggio and Claudia Aguirre get a little more into the weeds of their Star Trek-esque society in Lost on Planet Earth #2 as Xanthippean Velda shows the effects the Star Union had on her culture. Also, Basil’s parents continue to struggle with why she would drop out of a promising military career just to “hang out” with Velda. Lost on Planet Earth #2 is equal parts political satire and family drama, and Aguirre’s emotional art and vivid colors seal the deal. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

DCeased: Hope at World's End #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday. It’s been almost two months since the last time we’ve done this and we’re excited to be able to start again!

Disaster, Inc. #1 (AfterShock) – A new series from writer Joe Harris and artist Sebastian Piriz takes us on a tour of some of the worst places on earth while digging up trouble. The concept of disaster tourism is a new one for comics and we’re excited to check this one out. – Check out our exclusive preview.

The Goon #10 (Albatross Funnybooks) – Consistently one of the funniest and fun comics out there. It’s a spooky take on Popeye that’s beyond entertaining and a must for us each month.

In Vitro (Humanoids/Life Drawn) – A sweet, funny French graphic memoir by cartoonist William Roy about him and his wife’s quest to have a child via in vitro fertilization. – Read our review

Ludocrats #1 (Image Comics) – Kieron Gillen, Jim Rossignol, Tamra Bonvillain, and Jeff Stokely is a murderer’s row of creators. The series is described as “A collision of the ornate fantasy of Dune and an M-rated Asterix & Obelix! Baron Otto Von Hades and Professor Hades Zero-K are here, and they’re going to save us all have a nice time.” We already have a very positive review. – Read our review

Plunge #3 (DC Comics/DC Black Label/Hill House Comics) – Amazing horror from writer Joe Hill and artist Stuart Immonen. The third issue is beyond creepy.

Star Wars Adventures: Clone Wars #1 (IDW Publishing) – We’ll take more Clone Wars!

Superman Smashes the Klan (DC Comics) – Writer Gene Luen Yang and artist Gurihiru’s amazing series is collected and is beyond amazing. This is “best of the year” material that has Superman fighting the Klan in a story that riffs off of the classic radio serial.

Year Zero #1 (AWA Studios) – AWA has been a publisher to keep an eye on and this zombie series feels a bit weird to read considering the world but we’re still a sucker for the genre.

Digital Releases

DCeased: Hope at World’s End #1 (DC Comics) – DC surprised everyone with this digital-first release. It was unannounced and unexpected. Another zombie genre riff but DCeased so far has been a fantastic take on the genre and we want more.

Youth #2 (comiXology Original) – A new take on the superhero genre with a LGBT spin on it all. The first issue was solid and we want to read more and even more intrigued as it’s being worked on as a show from Amazon Studios.

Today’s comiXology Digital Releases Include a Surprise DCeased, Savage Sword of Conan, and Manga

Youth #2

ComiXology has dozens of new digital releases including the surprise DC Digital First, DCeased: Hope at World’s End! Check out below for the full list of releases and check back later today to see if there’s more!

Coamix Inc

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

DCeased: Hope at World's End #1

Futabasha Publishers

Kodansha

Marvel

Papercutz

Printemps Publishing

Seven Seas

VIZ Media

Yen Press

Review: Youth #1

Youth #1

Youth #1 is a new take on both the coming of age and superhero genres from Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cunniffe. It’s about two teenagers, River and Frank, who are kind of, sort of boyfriends, that are fed up with their lives so they steal River’s step dad’s mustang and go on the run. The comic has plenty of attitude, a little bit pretentiousness, and goes full throttle from the first page where Pires and Diotto cross cut between River being berated by his step dad and Frank being berated by his manager and a random customer at the fast food restaurant he works at. (Seriously, everyone seems to be an asshole in this universe.)

My favorite part of Youth #1 is Pires and Diotto’s creative use of grid layouts to introduce characters, ramp up conflict, and pull off one hell of a car chase. They immediately create parallels between River and Frank and establish a relationship between them based on shared trauma even though they don’t appear on panel together eight pages in. Basically, the world treats them like shit so they lash out through one great two panel page punch before slowing down to a more romantic nine panel grid with soft colors from Cunniffe.

After the blows are landed, Curt Pires immediately backpedals and uses a Mike Tyson quote to establish our protagonists as both unreliable narrators and the opposite of role models. With some Pires comics in the past, he seems to over-rely on purple prose narration, but he’s pared down this a lot or undercut it with self-deprecating humor. I enjoy that he and Diotto portray Frank and River as a couple of messed up kids, who fall in with other messed up kids later in the comic crafting a drama filled ensemble cast. Think the attractive cast of a reality television show, but with more overt drug use, assault of police officers, and in a breath of fresh air, queerness.

Heteronormativity is a big no-no in Youth #1 with River and Frank treating their homophobic classmate with a shrug as they skip town in a Mustang, or Frank telling a girl he makes out with at a party that he doesn’t like to label his sexuality. Your average, middle aged boring writer at the Big Two would make the high school bully some great foe for them, but he’s just an annoyance on their way to other adventures like blowing up cars, reenacting Grand Theft Auto, and this issue’s explosive ending.

Rebellion seems to be the central theme of Youth #1 with Frank and River truly having some to rage against as evidenced in the opening scene. However, it seems like some of their peers are rebelling just to rebel like the host of the party, who is the son of a senator, and parties in his huge house while his dad is doing consulting work in Dubai. The line of dialogue and corresponding image from Diotto is sharp satire at the children of well-off people, who choose to act out and rebel, but honestly, it makes sense that the cast of Youth are rough around the edges and can’t articulate their actions into a neat thesis.

Beat up a cop, go on the run, and fuck the consequences because life is short, right. However, the tail end of Youth #1 does introduce some consequences that will shape the narrative of this miniseries as Pires and Diotto introduce change into their story ecosystem like a splash page after a neat grid or car chase scene where you can see every maneuver.

Tone-wise, with its musical influence, teens on the run motif, and lackadaisical approach to superpowers, Youth #1 is We Can Never Go Home meets Chronicle, which is interesting because Pires has a written a few comics for Black Mask Studios. With their messy motivations, lust for life, and distrust of authority, I definitely gravitated to the teens of Youth even though they come across as little assholes at times. But weren’t we all at that age?

Story: Curt Pires Art: Alex Diotto 
Colors: Dee Cunniffe Letters: Micah Myers
Story: 7.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Comixology Originals provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

ComiXology has Nearly 50 New Digital Comics including DC, Marvel, Manga, Transformers, and new original Youth!

Youth

ComiXology has nearly 50 new digital comics for you to enjoy today from DC Comics, Marvel, lots of manga, including a new volume of the Transformers Manga! Also is the comiXology original debut of Youth!

Check out the full list and what you can get below!

Abrams Comicarts

Coamix Inc

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

Kodansha

Marvel

Seven Seas

Soleil

Sublime

Vertical

VIZ Media


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

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