Tag Archives: comixology originals

ComiXology Delivers Nearly 60 New Digital Comics For You Today

Batman #99

It’s Tuesday which means it’s one of two new comic book days this week! ComiXology has nearly 60 new digital comics for you to buy and read right now. Check out the full list of everything you can get here or the individual issues by publisher below!

Abrams Comicarts

Coamix

comiXology Originals

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Kodansha

Marvel

VIZ Media

Chuck Austen Returns with comiXology Original Series Edgeworld with art by Patrick Olliffe

This fall, comic book writer Chuck Austen is making his surprise return to comics.

Austen’s controversial takes on mainstream superhero characters divided fandom with their romance fueled storylines. Now he’s partnering with his good friend, long-time Marvel/DC artist Patrick Olliffe to create Edgeworld, an edgy expectation-busting western set in the far reaches of outer space. The latest creator-owned comic book series from comiXology OriginalsEdgeworld is a gritty, sexy, potent adventure series that’s part science fiction, part detective series, and part western. Joining Austen and Olliffe (who is illustrating his first creator-owned series) are acclaimed colorist Lee Loughridge, letterer Jodi Wynne, and editor Bis Stringer-Horne. Edgeworld debuts September 15, 2020 with issue #1 of 5.

In EdgeworldKillian Jess is the magistrate and a former United Authority soldier who knows the system, upholds the law, and delivers the verdict—with a vengeance. Alongside native Palan Cheela, Killian fights to protect the planet Pala, a backwater, frontier planet on the edge of known space located beneath a riftgate—the greatest and most valuable discovery in galactic history. Together, the duo must battle alien invasions, military forces, black market traders, otherworldly infestations, drug runners and the disastrous, ecological aftermath of a brutal, planet-wide war, in order to save the world they love.

Edgeworld #1

Part of the comiXology Originals line of exclusive content, Edgeworld #1 will be available upon release, at no additional cost, for members of Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited, and comiXology Unlimited, and for purchase on Kindle and comiXology. Prime Reading offers all Amazon Prime members a rotating selection of thousands of top Kindle books, magazines, short works, comic books, children’s books, and more – all at no additional cost. Kindle Unlimited offers over 1 million titles, thousands of audiobooks, and select current issues of popular magazines for just $9.99 a month with a 30-day free trial. ComiXology Unlimited now offers over 25,000 comics, graphic novels and manga for just $5.99 a month with a 30-day free trial.

ComiXology Delivers Nearly 50 New Digital Comics for You

Dark Nights: Death Metal Trinity Crisis #1

Tuesday is one of the two big comic release days and comiXology has you covered with nearly 50 new digital comics for you right now. Check out the full list and get shopping now or look at the individual issues by publisher below.

Abrams ComicArts

comiXology Original

DC Comics

Harlequin

Humanoids

Kodansha

Seven Seas

Vertical

VIZ Media


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

ComiXology Delivers Nearly 100 New Digital Comics For You Today

Batman #98

ComiXology has nearly 100 new digital comics available for you right now. New comics from DC, digital originals, manga, and Captain Underpants all await you! Check out the full list and get shopping now or the individual issues below.

Akita Publishing

Coamix

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Harpercollins

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Humanoids

Kodansha

Marvel

Medibang

Nihonbungeisha

Scholastic Graphix

Seven Seas

Torico

VIZ Media

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 8/29

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

40 Seconds #1 (comiXology Originals) – An interesting debut about a group of explorers setting off using gate technology sent by aliens. It’s very Stargate in the concept. There’s a lot teased out but the “meat” to make it stand out is never quite delivered. Not a bad start but it needs to show off a little more before it really stands out. So far, it’s a bit too familiar. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Hellions #3 (Marvel) – It’s quickly becoming my favorite of Marvel’s X-relaunch. While the series is getting away from the promise of exploring the concept of justice, it is delivering action and surprising humor with a tone that’s straight horror. Overall Rating: 8.35 Recommendation: Buy

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 (BOOM! Studios) – I don’t know the animated show but very familiar with the original video games and loved the previous comics. This was a surprising debut for me as it’s much more adult than expected. A good mystery and really interesting premise of a debut, it’s a lot more political than expected. Just a solid series start. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Nailbiter Returns #4 (Image Comics) – I’m a sucker for this series which is just over the top slasher horror. While this volume shifts things a bit to feel a bit more “Scream” in tone, there’s something fun and off the wall about it that just makes it fun. We’re starting to get a better idea as to what’s up with all of the Buckaroo Butchers being back but the big picture mystery is still there. Solid characters and great art combine for one of my favorite reads each month. Overall Rating: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #3 (Marvel) – Not quite as good as the previous volume, the series still does a solid job of mixing Indiana Jones and Star Wars. The issue delivers a lot of twists and turns and double-crosses keeping readers on their toes. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

X-Factor #2 (Marvel) – The other X-relaunch that’s fighting for the top spot of my favorite right now. The comic is just a hell of a lot of fun as the team head to the Mojoverse to investigate a murder. The concepts are fantastic and it’s a great update to Mojo’s world. The character interactions are what really stand out as every team member shines and are full of personality. Everyone has their moments and deliver laughs in their own way. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Chu #2 (Image Comics) – I always enjoyed the original Chew series and this prequel has me wanting to go back and re-read it to see how much of that is rose-colored glasses. This new series has lots of humor but also is a bit more sophomoric than what I remember from the previous series. There’s kinetic energy to it all but some jokes are cringeworthy with a bit too much of a focus on bodily functions. Maybe I outgrew the series in between them? This has been an odd first two issues to read. Like an old friend that you don’t quite get along with as you used to after a long time apart. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Logan

Amethyst #5 (DC/Wonder Comics)– Amy Reeder drops the big reveal in Amethyst #5 as Amy and her friends travel to the realm of Diamonds, who are responsible for keeping law and order in Gemworld. And Amy’s parents have definitely been found lacking. Reeder is definitely in flashback city mode in this issue as she and colorist Marissa Louise clearly delineate Amy’s parents’ moral failing and the real reason they’re “frozen” in a crystal and keep it interesting by using actual gems as layouts. Coupled with how Reeder shows how Amy and her friends react to everything, it’s more engaging than it has any business being. The lore of Gemworld is dense in a meant to sell toys 80s cartoon way, but it’s rendered less annoying by the universality of discovering that your parents aren’t angels and have done some fucked up things. Even if said fucked up things involve elemental MacGuffin thingies. To wrap things up, Amy Reeder’s art continues to be the main draw of Amethyst, and this series could have used more room to breathe plotwise instead of cramming all the big reveals into one issue. Overall: 7.5 Verdict: Read

The Question: Deaths of Vic Sage #4 (DC/Black Label)– Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor stick the landing perfectly in The Question #4 even tying together the multiple timelines. The books acts as both a tribute to Dennis O’Neil’s iconic work with the character, who turned him from an avatar of Objectivism to a more nuanced figure, and as ripped from the headlines work of almost-moral-philosophy about the pervasiveness of evil. (The opening comic could just as well take place in 2020 Louisville, Kentucky as fictional Hub City.) Basically, even if Donald Trump loses the election (Or suffers a similar fate as the antagonist of this miniseries.), white supremacism, racism, and oppression will continue to fester. Lemire and Cowan interrogate the futility of black and white thinking whether that’s big electoral politics, or on a genre-specific level, the slugfest that ends the majority of superhero comics. Big double page spreads filled with grids of ass-kicking or splashes of explosions come across as holding actions as Question’s mentor Tot acts as the voice of reason along the way. The Question #4 is a worthy conclusion for a series that had soul-searing visuals from Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor to go with dark night of the soul writing from Jeff Lemire. Overall: 10 Verdict: Buy

Fantastic Four: Antithesis #1 (Marvel)– When Mark Waid isn’t infusing his dialogue with pure boomer energy via his unfunny references to memes and transformation of Reed Richards into stretchy, technobabble spouting Homer Simpson, Fantastic Four: Antithesis #1 is a decent, throwback FF comic. Neal Adams and inker Mark Farmer draw crowd scenes and fight scenes with plenty of power and energy and vivid facial expressions. This book has a high concept hook and arrives at it in a visually memorable way. Waid and Adams are truly in summer blockbuster mode in FF: Antithesis with no fewer than three apocalypses being averted. The stakes are high, but have these two veteran creators blown their wad early? I guess we’ll find out down the road. Overall: 7.0 Verdict: Read

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 (BOOM!)– I’m not super familiar with the Mega Man franchise beyond the music of the Protomen and Mega Man Battle Network for the Game Boy Advance. However, I quite liked this comic book continuation of a recent Mega Man anime. There’s a beauty, motion, and expressiveness in Stefano Simeone’s art where he makes characters like Dr. Light, Skull Man, and Mega Man, of course, his own and really drives home the father/son story that AJ Marchisello and Marcus Rinehart were trying to tell. Igor Monti’s colors had a bleak, dystopian feel to the comic except when Mega Man is doing his thing during one of the several exciting action sequences. For the most part, Mega Man #1 isn’t really lore-driven and centers around the relationship between Mega Man, Dr. Light, and his sister Suna as well as the human/robot war. It’s worth a look if you like sci-fi dystopia or robot stories. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Dark Horse and ComiXology Cut a Deal to Bring comiXology Originals to Print

Dark Horse Comics and comiXology have announced that Dark Horse will distribute print editions of comiXology Originals graphic novels and collections. Select titles from the creator-owned line of comiXology Originals will be available in print for the first time for customers in comic shops, bookstores, and libraries. The program will commence in Spring 2021 with the release of paperback editions of the Eisner Award winner AFTERLIFT, Breaklands, YOUTH, and The Black Ghost.

When comiXology Originals was announced, print was a part of some of the releases through Amazon’s print on demand. While the digital program pressed on, the physical release of comics became few and far between to the complete lack of mention for numerous rounds of announcements.

Through this deal, Dark Horse Comics will be responsible for distribution and fulfillment for the titles through Diamond Comic Distributors for comic shops and Penguin Random House for bookstores around the world. ComiXology Originals will remain available to be read digitally for members of Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited, and comiXology Unlimited and for purchase on Kindle and comiXology.

ComiXology Originals’ exclusive content line debuted in 2017, and in their first year garnered an Eisner Award for Harvey Kurtzman’s Marley’s Ghost. The next year saw an Eisner Award nomination for The Stone King by Kel McDonald and Tyler Crook, and in 2020 an Eisner Award win for AFTERLIFT. In addition to the creator-owned line of exclusive content, comiXology Originals, through a partnership with Kodansha Comics, has re-released and newly translated manga such as BECKInitial D and The Drops of God.

The comiXology Originals making their print debut in 2021 include:

AFTERLIFTcollecting the Eisner Award-winning issues #1-5 – For the first time in print!

  • Written by Eisner Award winner Chip Zdarsky, best known for his work on Sex Criminals and Marvel Comics, with art by Jason Loo, the acclaimed artist of The Pitiful Human-Lizard, colors by Paris Alleyne, letters by Aditya Bidikar and edited by Allison O’Toole.
  • AFTERLIFT is a 2020 Eisner Award winning series.
  • In AFTERLIFT, Janice Chen is adrift. She quits her day job in finance and signs up to be a driver on a ride-sharing app. But what was at first a mundane but enjoyable way to pass the time takes a terrible turn when a mysterious passenger updates his ride with a very final destination: Hell.
  • 136 pages / color / on sale February 2 in bookstores and everywhere books are sold and February 3 in comic shops / MSRP $19.99/$25.99 pbk / ISBN: 978-1-5067-2440-9
AFTERLIFT

Breaklands Volume One, collecting issues #1-5 – For the first time in print!

  • Written by Justin Jordan, the co-creator and writer of The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, with art by acclaimed artist Tyasseta, colors by Sarah Stern, and letters by Rachel Deering.
  • Set 150 years after humanity developed psychic powers and ended the world as we know it, a new world has emerged. Everyone has powers. Some powers, like the ability to light a match, are modest. But some powers—like the ability to reshape the world—are both vast and dangerous. Kasa Fain is different. She doesn’t possess powers. Kasa is an outsider, a teenager who has been in hiding, until the day her younger brother is kidnapped and everything changes.
  • 152 pages / color / on sale March 2 in bookstores and everywhere books are sold and March 3 in comic shops / MSRP  $19.99/$25.99 pbk / ISBN: 978-1-5067-2441-6
Breaklands Volume One

YOUTH Volume One, collecting issues #1-4For the first time in print!

  • Written by visionary writer Curt Pires with art by Alex Diotto, the co-creators of the acclaimed comic Olympia, and features colors by Dee Cunniffe, and lettering by Micah Myers.
  • In YOUTH, Franklin and River struggle to navigate family, friends, high school, work, drugs, and all the pressures of growing up. As a queer couple, they yearn to escape their lives in a small, bigoted Midwest town. They steal River’s stepfather’s Mustang and hit the road. Their destination? California. But along the way, the car breaks down. They meet some kids who are travelling the country, partying, and attempting to find themselves. They party some more. . . . And soon everything changes.
  • A sequel to YOUTH is underway and the comic series is in development as an original TV show with Amazon Studios.
  • 136 pages / color / on sale on sale April 6 in bookstores and everywhere books are sold and April 7 in comic shops / MSRP $19.99/$25.99 pbk / ISBN: 978-1-5067-2461-4
YOUTH Volume One

The Black Ghost Volume One, collecting issues #1-5–For the first time in print!

  • Co-written by Anthony Award-Nominated Novelist Alex Segura and acclaimed writer Monica Gallagher, with art by George Kambadais, colors by Ellie Wright, lettering by Taylor Esposito and edited by Greg Lockard.
  • The Black Ghost is a modern take on the urban vigilante story. Lara Dominguez is a journalist chasing that one, big story. After a stint in the Middle East, the alcoholic reporter moves from her hometown of Miami to Creighton – a mid-Atlantic city that’s seen better days. She needs a huge, viral scoop that’ll send her into the journalistic stratosphere. Her target? Uncovering the identity of The Black Ghost – a masked vigilante trying to take down the wealthy oligarchs carving up the fading metropolis. But as she searches for the breakthrough story she desperately needs, Lara will have to navigate the corruption of her adopted city, the uncertainties of virtue, and her own personal demons.
  • 136 pages / color / on sale May 4 in bookstores and everywhere books are sold and May 5 in comic shops / MSRP $19.99/$25.99 pbk / ISBN: 978-1-50672-446-1
The Black Ghost Volume One

More comiXology Originals print editions will be announced at a later date.

ComiXology Original Elephantmen 2261 Season 3 Goes Documentary

Are you ready for the Elephantmen documentary? It’s coming your way—in Season 3 of the acclaimed comic book series written by Richard Starkings, with art by Axel Medellin, featuring covers by Boo Cook. Available from comiXology OriginalsElephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen debuts on July 7, 2020.

In Elephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen, British documentarian, Theo Laroux is making a documentary about the Elephantmen. Laroux arrives in California to begin interviews. He seeks out SKYCAB driver Miki in an effort to understand her apparent infatuation with one of the more well-known Elephantmen, Hip Flask and asks for her help in making the introduction to his first subject: LAPD Lieutenant Trench. Trench is a no nonsense, one-eyed zebra/human hybrid who takes him on a ridealong on the darker side of Los Angeles, 2261. But has Laroux unwittingly stumbled upon another story with much broader implications for all the Elephantmen?

Elephantmen 2261 is available upon release, at no additional cost, for members of Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited, and comiXology Unlimited, and for purchase on Kindle and comiXology. Prime Reading offers all Amazon Prime members a rotating selection of over a thousand top Kindle books, magazines, short works, comic books, children’s books, and more – all at no additional cost. Kindle Unlimited offers over 1 million titles, thousands of audiobooks, and select current issues of popular magazines for just $9.99 a month with a 60-day free trial. ComiXology Unlimited now offers over 25,000 comics, graphic novels and manga for just $5.99 a month with a 60-day free trial.

Elephantmen 2261 Season 3: Theo Laroux Meets The Elephantmen

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 6/6

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Aggretsuko #3 (Oni Press) – In Aggretsuko #3, a staff member (Fittingly named Karen.) from the company’s Canada office visits Retsuko’s job in Japan to see why their employees scored so low on a moral survey and to increase “workflow synergy”. Writer/artist Brenda Hickey expertly satirizes corporate speak, sticky notes, and outside consultants who babysit you all day so that you get no work done. However, as the story progresses, Hickey fleshes out the character of Karen and finds out that she and Retsuko have a lot in common, and she takes some of her feedback to not jump down everyone’s throats. This comic is cathartic for anyone who has had a terrible boss that has made them to do tasks unrelated to their job, and Hickey’s art has a great energy that fits into the show’s aesthetic. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Youth #4 (Comixology Originals) – Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cuniffe’s Youth wraps up with a bit of a bang and a bit of a whimper. Even though he’s a Nick Fury expy, Youth #4 shows how much a badass Thunder is as he survives being gutted by one of the posthumans and returns to wreak vengeance. This fits in with Diotto and Cunniffe’s visceral approach to superpowers with abilities having intense bodily effects on both their users and recipients. Probably, the best part of this comic is showing how River and Frank met and a conversation that shows that they really care about each other. There’s a bit of symbolism to one of the character’s names. The bad part of this comic is that the story and final battle feels rushed, and I feel like I don’t know the characters beyond River and Frank. Pires quickly adds powers to wrap up the story/set up the new one and superhero cliches like a secret hideout instead of subverting them. Frank does get some funny lines roasting his friends’ attempts at starting a super-team. It really seems like a story device to extend the run of the comic/upcoming Amazon Prime TV show instead of something organic and naturalistic. Overall: 6.8 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Today’s New Digital Comics is Filled with New DC and Manga

Youth #4

Check out today’s new digital comic releases available on comiXology. There’s 58 new comics debuting this morning from DC, Seven Seas, VIZ Media, Yen Press, and more!

There’s a bit of something for everyone all available at your fingertips. Check out the full list on their site or check out individual issues below.

Andrews McMeel

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

Kodansha

Medibang

Nihonbungeisha

Printemps Publishing

Scholastic Graphix

Seven Seas

VIZ Media

Yen Press


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 5/30

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Joe Hesh

Batman: The Adventures Continue #3 (DC Digital) After a good first two issues that took me down memory lane, this one was more like an overstayed welcome. Sure I love Robin and Deathstroke as characters but this was incredibly bland. Three quarters of the issue take place inside a museum where Robin and Slade are waiting to foil Firefly’s latest heist. We all know that Slade is playing Robin to get to Bruce but it is an incredibly dull journey getting there this time. The only highlight of the issue is when Bruce is bringing down Mad Hatter and his Wonderland Gang and he thinking to himself how Tim would have enjoyed it and he’s actually missing his quips. That was a nice touch. Ty Templeton does great visuals here and it could have leapt off the animation cells themselves but the writing from Alan Burnett and Paul Dini (I can’t believe I’m writing this) really fails to connect here. Hoping next issue this picks up the pace major. It is a limited series and we’ve got so much to get to. Just get to Jason Todd and Asrael already! I digress. Score: 6.5

Venom #25 (Marvel Comics) These days anything writer Donny Cates touches turns to gold right? Welllll, and anything my childhood artist Mark Bagley turns out is amazing right? Welllll, not quite. Now mind you the whole Venom run and Venom Island has been awesome thus far but this issue just fell flat. You would think with no new comics for two months and a big return could do no wrong. For me though it just wasn’t it. First off the whole issue is told via flashback which is a device I am not very fond of. Especially as the conclusion to a huge epic! However it’s not all bad. We have great art by Bagley but the script just wasn’t energetic enough. Venom vs Carnage final bow on the island. It was cool and all I just wanted more. I do like Eddie’s involvement with the Avengers though. Plus we are warned about the coming of Knull which should be some good shit. Score: 7.6

Logan

Youth #3 (Comixology Originals) Youth #3 is kind of a messy comic opening up with an extended conversation from a redshirt security guard about how he hates pregnant women and the effects of Five Guys on his digestive system. Ok, Curt Pires, we understand you think you’re like Quentin Tarantino. However, once he and artists Alex Diotto and Dee Cunniffe focus on the effects of having superpowers on the cast and especially the relationship between Franklin and River, the book gets good again. Pires and Diotto show these teens don’t give a shit about superheroes, but use their abilities to get money and party, consequences be damned. I especially like the cut-up panels and day glo colors that Diotto and Cunniffe bring to the club sequence, which starts fun and turns grotesque. I wish I knew more about these characters other than general anger and horniness, but Youth #3 is a marked improvement over the previous issue if not a great issue just yet. Overall: 7.6 Verdict: Read

Marauders #10 (Marvel) Forge’s anti-mutant tech has fallen into the hands of the Russians, and it’s up to the Marauders to stop them in this action-packed, nearly standalone story from Gerry Duggan, Stefano Caselli, and Edgar Delgado. Casselli’s art isn’t flashy, but it’s easy to follow especially during the big action sequence. Emma Frost gets to use both her womanly intuition and psychic abilities in a dramatic scene that comes across at revenge for what happens to Kate Pryde. Because of these actions, Krakoa isn’t afraid to do some more overt action instead of just relying on X-Force. And there’s also developments on that front with Duggan including two of the saddest diagram pages yet: a couple of last emails between Kate and Nightcrawler. Overall: 8.3 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

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