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Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2016

Some amazing comics came out in 2016 from both the Big Two and the indie ranks. This was the year that I had a lot of fun reading the books that came out in the “margins” of Marvel and DC that didn’t feature their top characters, but had idiosyncratic, top notch visuals, or just a good sense of humor. Black Mask continues to be my go-to for hard hitting indie work, and the whole BOOM! Box imprint continues to be as fun as ever.

Without further ado, these are my personal favorite comics of 2016, the ones that stimulated and entertained me the most in this difficult year.

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10. Kim and Kim #1-4 (Black Mask)
Writer: Mags Visaggio Artist: Eva Cabrera Colorist: Claudia Aguirre

Kim and Kim was a super fun sci-fi miniseries with some wild and wacky worldbuilding, rollicking action scenes, and lots of hilarious interactions between the two leads, Kim Q and Kim D. Writer Mags Visaggio put their friendship front and center giving the comic a strong emotional through-line between bounty hunter shenanigans. Also, Eva Cabrera excels at drawing attractive humans as well as strange aliens, and I enjoyed Claudia Aguirre’s pastel-filled color palette. It was also nice to have a story starring two queer women not end in senseless death.

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9. Jonesy #1-8 (BOOM! Studios)
Writer: Sam Humphries Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle Colorists: Mickey Quinn, Brittany Peer

Every year, the BOOM! Box imprint seems to churn out a new title that captures my heart. Jonesy is a fire cracker of a comic starring a teenage girl, who can make anyone fall in love with anything. Unfortunately, that power doesn’t work on her personally, and it gets her into a lot of trouble. Sam Humphries’ writing has as little chill as his protagonist, and Caitlin Rose-Boyle’s art evokes the zines that Jonesy loves to make about her favorite pop star, Stuff. The hyper-stylized plots and faces that Jonesy pulls kept me laughing while Jonesy’s struggles with finding someone to love her and her strained relationship with her mom in the second arc gave me the feels. Her and her friends’ unabashed passion for life is kind of inspiring too.

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8. Ultimates #3-12, Ultimates 2 #1-2 (Marvel)
Writer: Al Ewing Artists: Kenneth Rocafort, Christian Ward, Djibril Morrisette-Phan, Travel Foreman Colorist: Dan Brown

Ultimates and Ultimates 2 were the gold standard for team superhero book at both Marvel and DC, and not even Civil War II could stop this title’s momentum. The Al Ewing-penned comic was more of a science fiction saga that happened to star a diverse cast of superheroes than a straight up team book as they tried to find productive solutions to problems like Galactus and the Anti-Man instead of just punching things. And like all good team books, there’s some great interpersonal tension like when Black Panther puts Wakanda before the team, Ms. America defies Captain Marvel, and Spectrum and Blue Marvel start smooching. Ultimates also has some wonderful tapestry-style double page spreads from artists Kenneth Rocafort, Christian Ward, and Travel Foreman that match its multiversal scope. It’s an entertaining and esoteric comic.

 

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7. Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #1-2 (DC)
Writer: Sarah Vaughn Artist: Lan Medina Colorist: Jose Villarrubia

In 2016, DC really stretched its wings genre-wise with the Young Animal imprint and comics, like a satirical take on the Flintstones. But, the best of this quirky bunch was a Gothic romance take on Deadman from Fresh Romance‘s Sarah Vaughn, Fables‘ Lan Medina, and atmospheric colorist Jose Villarrubia. The main character, Berenice, can see ghosts, including Deadman, who are trapped in a haunted British mansion. There are secret passageways, mysterious backstories, and an epic, bisexual love triangle, but mostly, Deadman is a meditation on mortality and relationships, both platonic and romantic with some jaw-dropping scenery from Medina and Villarrubia.

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6. Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat #2-13 (Marvel)
Writer: Kate Leth Artists: Brittney Williams, Natasha Allegri Colorists: Megan Wilson, Rachelle Rosenberg

Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat is a comic that acknowledges how annoying getting your life together can be for twenty-somethings, who live in the city. Kate Leth, Brittney Williams, Megan Wilson, and Rachelle Rosenberg also throw injourneys to Hell, guest appearances from Jessica Jones and Jubilee, telekinetic bisexuals quoting Hamilton, and nods to the old Patsy Walker romance comics to a quite relatable comic. Brittney Williams’ Magical Girl and Chibi-inspired art is great for comedy purposes, but she and Leth also had some emotional payoffs throughout Hellcat thanks to the relationships developed between Patsy, Ian Soo, and She-Hulk, especially when she reacts to She-Hulk’s injury in Civil War II. Hellcat is fierce, high energy comic that is the best of both romance and superhero comics with the occasional trippy scene shift from Williams, Wilson, and Rosenberg.

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5. Mockingbird  #1-8 (Marvel)
Writer: Chelsea Cain Artist: Kate Niemczyk, Sean Parsons, Ibrahim Moustafa Colorist: Rachelle Rosenberg

Mockingbird was experimental, unabashedly feminist, pretty sexy, and just happened to star a former West Coast Avenger and be published by Marvel Comics. Thriller novelist Chelsea Cain plotted a pair of mysteries, involving cosplay cruises, doctor waiting rooms, corgis, and Marvel Universe deep cuts that were engaging thanks to detail filled art from Kate Niemczyk and inker Sean Parsons. Loaded with background gags and subtle foreshadowing for future issues, Mockingbird certainly has “replay” value as a comic and is triumphant, messy, and funny just like its lead character, Bobbi Morse and was a coming out party for Marvel’s next great colorist, Rachelle Rosenberg.

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4. Love is Love (IDW)
Writers: Various Artists: Various

I just reviewed this comics anthology a few days ago, but Love is Love is the 2016 comic that affected me personally the most as it showed the effects of The Pulse shooting on the LGBTQ community in a variety of ways. I latched onto stories about the vibrancy of the queer community in Orlando, the sanctuary effect of gay clubs that provided some of the anthology’s best visuals from Jesus Merino, Alejandra Gutierrez, and Michael Oeming, and the use of superheroes like Batman, Midnighter, and Supergirl as simple analogues of hope in the middle of heartbreak. Love is Love saddened me, but it also inspired me to continue to uplift my LGBTQ siblings as the racist, sexist, homophobes Trump and Pence take the office of president and vice president. It was also cool to see so many talented creators using their gifts to help raise money for Equality Florida.

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3. The Wicked + the Divine #18-24, #1831 (Image)
Writer: Kieron Gillen Artists: Jamie McKelvie, Stephanie Hans, Kevin Wada Colorist: Matthew Wilson

In WicDiv‘s third year, Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson went a little blockbuster with big battles, splash pages, and an unexpected character death. But, the comic is still about the journey of Laura (Now Persephone.) from fan to artist, and how it has changed her life and relationships. And, in time honored tradition, WicDiv wasn’t afraid to get experimental with an issue featuring a Pantheon of Romantic poets and writers, like Mary Shelley and Lord Byron with lavish guest art from Journey into Mystery‘s Stephanie Hans, or the magazine issue with professional journalists interviewing Kieron Gillen roleplaying as Fantheon members with beautiful spot illustrations from Kevin Wada. As WicDiv enters its “Imperial Phase”, McKelvie and Wilson’s art is both opulent and disarming while Kieron Gillen has started to expose the personalities behind the explosions and drama of “Rising Action”.

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2. Giant Days #10-21, Holiday Special #1 (BOOM!)
Writer: John Allison Artists: Max Sarin, Liz Fleming Colorist: Whitney Cogar

Giant Days is funny, true, shows the value of a good inker in Liz Fleming to nail a face or gesture, and reminds me of a weekend I spent in its setting of Sheffield over two years ago. John Allison and Max Sarin have developed the personalities and mannerisms of the three leads: Susan, Esther, and Daisy that any situation that they’re plugged into from music festivals to housing selections and even cheating rings is pure entertainment. Allison, Sarin, and the bright colors of Whitney Cogar nail the ups and downs of college life with a touch of the surreal, and the series continues to be more compelling as we get to know Susan, Esther, and Daisy better as people.

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1. Midnighter #8-12, Midnighter and Apollo #1-3 (DC)
Writer: Steve Orlando Artists: David Messina, Gaetano Carlucci, ACO, Hugo Petrus, Fernando Blanco Colorist: Romulo Fajardo Jr.

Steve Orlando’s run on Midnighter and Midnighter and Apollo has the most bone breaking action, the coolest panel layouts from David Messina, ACO, and Fernando Blanco and yes, the hottest kisses and other sexy stuff as Midnighter and Apollo are back in a relationship. Orlando shows his passion for the DC and Wildstorm universes by bringing in obscure or neglected characters, like Extrano, and making them instantly compelling or frightening in the case of Henry Bendix. Watching Midnighter skillfully take down opponents from the Suicide Squad to subway pirates or demons is an adrenaline rush, and Orlando tempers these action scenes with plenty of romance and personal moments. Midnighter and Midnighter and Apollo aren’t just the best superhero comics of 2016, but the best ones period. Come for the one-liners and shattered limbs and stay for the self-sacrificing love.

Preview: Jonesy #8

Jonesy #8

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Price: $3.99

Jonesy and Susan have to sneak into a concert to see Susan’s favorite singer ever, Sister Cee Cee!

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Preview: Jonesy #7

Jonesy #7

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle

Will Jonesy survive a visit from…her mom?!

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Preview: Jonesy Vol. 1 TP

Jonesy Vol. 1 TP

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Price: $14.99
On Sale: 09/28/16 in comic book shops, 10/04/16 in bookstores

Jonesy is a comic about love that makes us swoon! Sam Humphries (Legendary Star Lord, Citizen Jack) and fresh talent Caitlin Rose Boyle (Buck n’ Lou & the Night Crew) bring something special to BOOM! Box with this series about mad-cap shenanigans, friendship, pals, being a teenager, and figuring out who you are…with a teen cupid twist! If you like Giant Days, dig adorkable romance stories, or just want to smile from ear to ear after reading a comic, you’ll fall in love with Jonesy!

Jonesy is a self-described “cool dork” who spends her time making zines nobody reads, watching anime, and listening to riot grrrl bands and 1D simultaneously. But she has a secret nobody knows. She has the power to make people fall in love! Anyone. With anything. There’s only one catch—it doesn’t work on herself. She’s gonna have to find love the old-fashioned way, and in the meantime, figure out how to distract herself from the real emotions she inevitably has to face when her powers go wrong. Collects the complete limited series.

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Preview: Jonesy #6

Jonesy #6

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Price: $3.99

With Stuff’s debut concert in Plymouth only days away, Jonesy must make a big decision. Enter: ABUELITA!

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Preview: Amazing Forest TPB

Amazing Forest TPB

Erick Freitas & Ulises Farinas (w) • Julien Dufour, Matt Rota, Melody Often, Yumi Sakugawa, Caitlin Rose Boyle, Angelica Blevins, Sean Pryor, Buster Moody, Job Yamen, Skuds Mckinley, Austin Breed, Zoe Crockett, Jelena Djordjevic, Victor Puchalski, Adrian Bago Gonzalez, Hyendo Park, Jack Forbes, Teylor Smirl, Alison Wight, Edwin Vazquez, Mike Prezzato, Marcus Muller, Jon Sperry, A. Shay Hahn (a) • Ulises Farinas (c)

Tales for the bold. Ideas for the strange. Wicked concepts that stir the minds of those with darkness in their hearts. A modern anthology that lends itself to a time when stories were short and ugly. Written by Ulises Farinas and Erick Freitas, each comic is drawn by a different, amazingly talented artist each lending their unique talents to bring horrible happiness to the readers’ skulls!

TPB • FC • $24.99 • 208 pages • ISBN: 978-1-63140-677-5

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Preview: Jonesy #5

Jonesy #5

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Price: $3.99

The hit comic that critics say is “the awesome anti-Valentine you’ve been waiting for” and is a “great gateway comic for young girls” is now an ongoing series!

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Preview: Jonesy #4

Jonesy #4

Publisher: BOOM! Box
Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Cover Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle
Price: $3.99

Now an ongoing series! Jonesy’s going to take down prom once and for all!

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Preview: Jonesy #3 (of 4)

Jonesy #3 (of 4)

Writer: Sam Humphries
Artist: Caitlin Rose Boyle

Jonesy reeeaally wants a tattoo of her favorite anime pop idol, but when she tries to get her dad on board with the idea, she accidentally makes him want a tattoo instead!

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Review: Jonesy #2

Jonesy_002_A_MainIf the first issue didn’t prove it, Jonesy #2 just showed how much of a delightful story it is as it goes out of the school and into the town talent show as Jonesy works her dad’s donut shop when all she wants to do is watch the new Stuff video. When the Butt Brothers steal her zines though, she ends up forming an unlikely friendship with Susan to get them back.

This issue spoke to me on a spiritual level. Not only with the normalized queerness of Susan admitting she likes a girl named Nisha in her chemistry class and Jonesy no-selling the reaction to it, but with Jonesy admitting her secret crush is actually on Stuff, a pop star who pretends he’s an alien prince. Don’t feel too bad about that, Jonesy. I currently have a similar type crush on an Irish wrestler who acts like a demon about four or five times a year and I’ve been out of high school for a long time. Artist Caitlin Rose Boyle’s design of him is absolutely darling though, so it’s easy to see why Jonesy is so obsessed with him. Mickey Quinn’s similar coloring between him and Nisha is a nice touch as well. Not to mention the way Susan and Jonesy talk about their crushes is so cute and relatable, it’s kind of surprising to find out writer Sam Humphries wasn’t a teenage girl at one point.

However, it’s not all crushes and games as Jonesy gets her zines stolen and ends up hurting Susan’s feelings and disappointing her dad in the process of getting them back when she makes the Butt Brothers fall in love with Susan’s hat. As with the previous issue, #2 does a great job of showing that while Jonesy is an absolutely lovable protagonist, she’s not always a good person. While she makes great progress in becoming friends with her old enemy in this issue with the formation of the Secret Crush Investigation Squad, she still makes mistakes and thinks selfishly. The best thing about that though? She realizes that when she does, and apologizes accordingly. Even in two issues, we see so much character growth from Jonesy and it does a great job of showing younger readers that you can make up for your choices.

As Jonesy and Susan walk off into the sunset arm and arm, it’s obvious that its the start of a beautiful friendship. Though one that Principal Rosenfield is not happy about as she puts two and two together about the Carnation incident, the Butt Brothers, and Jonesy. Oh no.

Jonesy #2 keeps the pace of the first issue while still showing progress for both the characters of Jonesy and Susan as they turn from enemies to friends over the course of the issue. Along with the series normalizing queerness, it also is refreshing to see a series lead by two young women of color without ever resorting to stereotypes and to see such a realistic and fun take on teenage crushes. The art is still gorgeous and on point, especially with the way Quinn gets to expand the color palette from the first issue in really bright and exciting ways. Humphries, Boyle and Quinn have real magic with the series, and I’m not just saying that because of Jonesy’s powers.

Story: Sam Humphries Art: Caitlin Rose Boyle and Mickey Quinn
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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