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Faith Episode 2 is Out Now!

Valiant Entertainment has released the second episode of the Faith Motion Comic!

The first episode explored the origin of Faith Herbert, aka Zephyr, and the relationship with her first love and fellow Harbinger Renegade John Torkelson, aka Torque… but what’s next for the heroes and where will Faith’s adventures lead her? The second episode is now available to watch on Valiant Entertainment’s YouTube channel.

Plus: An action-packed motion comic featuring Bloodshot will arrive next week!

Faith’s motion comic series is pulled from the pages of Harbinger: Faith #0featuring a script by Joshua Dysart, artwork by Robert Gill and José Villarrubia, and letters by Dave Sharpe. See below for the motion comic’s credits.

Voice Actors
FAITH: Tamara Fritz
GRANDMA: Phoenix Emrys
TORQUE: Eric Shonk
COMIC SHOP OWNER: Joe Cliff Thompson
AGENT: Megan Youmans
FIREMAN: Kenneth Faircloth

Crew
Editor: Brian Paterno
Animator: Sam Warren
Audio Supervisor: Joe Thompson

Preview: Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Faith #1

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Faith #1

(W) Jordie Bellaire, Jeremy Lambert (A) Eleonora Carlini (CA) Kevin Wada
In Shops: Feb 24, 2021
SRP: $7.99

THE FUTURE OF THE BUFFYVERSE BEGINS HERE!

The future of the Buffyverse begins in an all new one-shot revealing the secrets of Faith the Vampire Slayer.

With no Watcher, no idea how to harness the power in her and no idea where it came from, Faith has fallen back on old habits -and morals – to guide her.

But what happens when those morals don’t line up with the Council’s… or with Buffy’s?

The origin of Faith is revealed here for the first time, with a shocking ending to this issue!

A perfect jumping on point for new and longtime Buffy fans alike that sets the stage for shocking events to come.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Faith #1

Valiant Hero Of The Week: Faith

Every Monday for the next few weeks, Valiant Entertainment is running a poll on Twitter to provide fans with some escapism while new comics are in short supply. The poll allows Valiant fans the opportunity to select the “Hero Of The Week” from four choices. That week’s hero will then be the focus of free pdfs featuring the character, videos from Valiant staff, giveaways, and more. This week, the poll featured Faith, Ninjak, Roku, and Ivar, Timewalker.

This week’s winner was…

Faith

Who is she? Faith is the kind of character that you could meet at a convention and shoot the shit with. She’s a nerd that loves comics, DND, fantasy books and movies, and who just happens to be a young superhero by the name of Zephyr. But then since everybody seems to know Zephyr’s real name, Faith has a secret identity that is based entirely off what she thinks a hero should do in their off hours. Because Clark Kent is a reporter, Faith begins working at a newspaper an online gossip magazine because newspaper circulation is notoriously low these days.

When you’re reading a book with Faith, it’s very easy to see yourself in her. She’s a comic book fan who’s also a superhero. She has a history with the Harbinger Foundation (which you can read about in Harbinger), but it doesn’t define who she is; Faith is a happy, bubbly person who is more concerned with doing what’s right than she is almost anything else.

She’s the purest hero in the Valiant Universe.

What should you read?

Faith: Hollywood And Vine

Orphaned at a young age, Faith Herbert – a psionically gifted “psiot” discovered by the Harbinger Foundation – has always aspired to greatness. But now this once-ordinary teenager is taking control of her destiny and becoming the hard-hitting hero she’s always known she can be – complete with a mild-mannered secret identity, unsuspecting colleagues, and a day job as a reporter that routinely throws her into harm’s way! Well, at least she thought it would… When she’s not typing up listicles about cat videos, Faith makes a secret transformation to patrol the night as the City of Angels’ own leading superhero – the sky-soaring Zephyr!


Hollywood And Vine was actually my first introduction to Faith, and I quickly fell in love with the comic and the character. There’s a fantastic moment in the third issue of the series that finds Faith in a literal and metaphorical closet as trouble closes in around her. What she does, or doesn’t do next is one of the most interesting and fist bumpingly awesome moments I’ve read in awhile. This book starts Jody Houser’s run on the character, and it’s a really good run.

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyBookshop


Faith: California Scheming

In a city under siege by robots, aliens, monsters, and even worse… celebrities, there is only one woman the people of Los Angeles can count on: the stratospheric superhero called Faith! Aspiring reporter by day and dedicated crime-fighter by night, Faith has tackled every obstacle in her path with confidence – like those crushing deadlines at work, the long-distance boyfriend half a world away, and the missing back issues that plague her comics collection! But, unbeknownst to her, Faith is about to collide with the one force she never saw coming: an up-and-coming super-villain bent on snuffing her out once and for all! But who is lurking behind the mask of her new foe…and could they just be the one person capable of rendering Faith powerless?


After the magic of the miniseries, which you can read about above if you haven’t (though why you’d skip to a different heading, I’m not sure), Valiant began an ongoing series staring the character with the creative team in tact. This is another solid introduction to the character, but it doesn’t quite capture the magic of the first volume (in fairness, it was never going to be as good in my eyes because of the third issue of the mini), but it comes very close. This is a great follow up to Hollywood And Vine, and one I have no hesitation in recommending.

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyBookshop


Faith And The Future Force

Faith “Zephyr” Herbert – former member of Unity, current Harbinger Renegade, and Los Angeles’ #1 superhero – is the universe’s last, best chance at survival! Centuries from today, a devious artificial intelligence has unleashed a blistering attack on the very foundations of time…one that is unwriting history from beginning to end! Now, with her options exhausted, Neela Sethi, Timewalker – the self-appointed protector of what is and will be – has returned to the 21st century to recruit Earth’s greatest champions of today and tomorrow to oppose this existential threat…and she needs Faith to lead them! But why Faith? And why now?


I’m a sucker for time travel stories. I’ll make no apologies for that. So when this came along with Faith and a really well crafted four issue miniseries that takes moments from the classic Bill Murray flick Groundhog Day and strains them through a superhero filter. It would be fun enough on its own, but when you add Faith’s nerd cred to the story, the entire thing becomes what can only be described as organized chaos. It’s a really fun yarn, and introduces you to Neela Sethi and Ank if you haven’t read Ivar, Timewalker already as the pair try and stop a universe ending threat dozens of times…

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyBookshop


It’s worth noting that you can get Deluxe Editions of many of these stories that collect what amounts to three trades in a hardcover. They are comparatively better valued, but present a higher initial cost (based on standard retail pricing not including sales and discounts). They’re my personal preference.


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Our Favorite Faith Covers

The super team Faith gets the spotlight this week as the winner of Valiant‘s “Hero of the Week. Fans chose the team over Ninjak, Roku, and Ivar, Timewalker, and we (well, me) thought it would be a great chance to highlight some of our favorite covers featuring the character. All of these covers will be post the 2012 relaunch of Valiant and are shown in no particular order.

The below covers are some of the most striking, iconic or just plain cool images featuring Faith.

Sound off on your favorite covers below!

Faith Takes Readers to Greater Heights in a New YA Novel

Faith: Greater Heights, the eagerly anticipated sequel to the popular young adult novel Faith: Taking Flight, arrives this November! A

New York Times bestselling author Julie Murphy returns to Faith Herbert’s world for an inspiring and exciting tale as the fan-favorite superhero experiences the last few weeks of her senior year in High School. She would love to wrap up her last year of school like a normal student – enjoy prom, hang out with her friends – but that isn’t so simple when you’re a hero! Along with her friends, Faith will uncover some big mysteries…

Check out the new cover, featuring art by Kat Goodloe and design by Jenna Stempel-Lobell below.

The conclusion to Faith’s YA adventure goes on sale November 2nd, 2021, and is currently available for pre-orderFaith: Taking Flight is available for purchase wherever books are sold. A paperback version of Taking Flight will be available on May 25th.

Faith: Greater Heights

Valiant and H3 Team for Sportgear featuring Bloodshot and Faith

Valiant Entertainment is partnering with H3 Sportgear to deliver an amazing collection of apparel that features fan-favorite characters Bloodshot and Faith!

Treat yourself to some fabulous fashion as H3 Sportgear, via its Pop Cult online store, is proud to offer an exclusive collection based on Valiant Entertainment’s breakout characters. There’s no better way to celebrate Valiant’s characters than wearing this comfy casualwear.

Available right now are two collections available through the Pop Cult online store: Faith Collection: Purchase and
Bloodshot Collection: Purchase

Exclusive: Torunn Grønbekk Discusses Faith and Sisterhood in Warhammer 40,000: Sisters of Battle. Plus a Preview of Issue 4

Warhammer 40,000: Sisters of Battle #4

The world of Games Workshop‘s Warhammer 40,000 has come to Marvel Comics! The second series, written by Torunn Grønbekk with art by Edgar Salazar, finds a squad of Adepta Sororitas, aka Sisters of Battle, on a mission and surrounded by the corruption of Chaos.

I got to ask Torunn about her own history with Warhammer 40,000 and what it’s like to work with Games Workshop and write for the Sisters of Battle.

Graphic Policy: What was your experience with Games Workshop before working on Warhammer 40,000: Sisters of Battle? Have you played any of their games?

Torunn Grønbekk: I got into Warhammer back in the Fantasy days (…20 years ago!) It took me a while to discover the glory of Warhammer 40,000, but after reading up on the lore before painting some Warhammer 40,000 minis for a friend, I was hooked.

– Nowadays, I tend to paint more than I play, but I’ve still got my Sisters of Battle army.

GP: The first edition rulebook of Warhammer 40,000 is almost 35 years old, and there’s so much rich history of the world. Is it overwhelming diving into a project like this?

TG: I’d say it’s more inspirational than overwhelming. There’s, of course, a massive amount of lore to get lost in, but I had a fairly good understanding of the universe when I came on board this project. More often than not, taking a deep dive into researching very specific details would spark new ideas, so I wouldn’t have wanted to be without those side quests for sure.

GP: What type of research goes into a project like this?

TG: The extensive kind. Once I had the general idea in place, I needed to make sure if and how what I had in mind would work. Even the smallest detail needed to be researched and considered. For example, one of the characters is a Sister Dialogus who is on the mission specifically to record and translate ancient symbols carved into the walls of the underground city. Now, I knew they have pict-recorders, but are they readily available? Would they actually be used for something like this? Would it perhaps be built into a cherub that silently and creepily followed the squad, recording everything? (The latter being my favorite option, but it would also mean explaining it, drawing more attention to this specific plot point than was necessary — and of course, it would be one more element for Edgar to draw on almost every page) In the end, and after a ton of research, I opted to equip Sister Heda with plenty of war gear, haughty righteousness, and a notebook instead.

Another important thing was to verify the things I thought I knew to make sure my subjective understanding of the universe was both objectively correct and up-to-date. Like for most people, my knowledge of the lore comes from a mishmash of sources: what I read and play, my friends, the codexes, Black Library books etc. An excellent foundation, but not all sources are created equal, and I needed to make sure I got everything right. That meant a lot of re-reading of the codexes, checking sources online, and if all else failed: asking Games Workshop directly.

GP: What has stood out to you about this force and their history?

TG: Pipe organ tank!!! (I joke, but not really.)

Despite being a staunch atheist, it was this idea of faith I first found truly fascinating about the Sisterhood. And, let’s face it, they are just so damn cool. They are well-considered in every possible way, and I find the miniatures utterly delightful. The first time I saw an Exorcist, I squealed.

GP: Something that has stood out to me is the focus of the squad with this series. The previous series was very much about Marneus and his history. Canoness Veridyan is part of the story, but it comes off as she’s a part of a squad, not the center of attention. Was the shift to pulling the focus away from an individual on purpose?

TG: Very much so. I wanted to write a story that rang true to people familiar with The Sisters and the lore, but also one that works as an introduction to The Sisters for those who aren’t. Focusing on the sisterhood, following one squad, and how they worked together seemed more appropriate than singling out one specific Sister. Canoness Veridyan is a great character in her own right, but she is first and foremost a commander in The Order Militant. If you want to get to know her, I believe the best approach is to see how she leads and puts her trust in her squad.

GP: There’s also a very interesting change in that the previous series was very open in its settings while this is very claustrophobic in tunnels underground. Was that intentional?

TG: Absolutely! The tunnels serve a practical function, too: I wanted the squad cut off from the rest of the army, which meant sending them somewhere the Sister’s Vox just couldn’t reach.

It also lends itself well to worldbuilding. Civilian life in Warhammer 40,000 is always interesting (if, y’know, dire), and though we focus mostly on the Sisters and the cult, my goal was to make the underground city a place that felt lived in. I spent a lot of time figuring out how the population would spend its days, what kind of work they do, what they eat, how they worship, and it all began with the architecture of the underground city. (Not all of that makes it into the comic, of course, but some things do, like the giant mirror relay system that transports light from the surface down throughout the city. The idea was that this population that rarely, if ever, sees daylight would find the blinding Emperor’s light transporting – much more a religious experience than, say, a sermon. That fact that we could use it to blind some heretics before killing them was just the icing on the cake.)

GP: Chaos has corrupted the planet Siscia. Was there ever a discussion about another enemy or was it always Chaos? Genestealer Cults feel like they’d work well with this story as well.

TG: Certainly! Genestealer cults were actually very much on the table (so to speak), but as I worked through how I wanted things to play out, how much space we had available to tell the story etc, Chaos ended up as a better choice.

GP: There’s been a lot about the Sister’s faith in the Emperor. It’s absolutely something that makes them stand out from other forces of the Imperium. Was that something you really wanted to highlight through the story?

TG: Definitely. The Sister’s faith is such an integral part of their characters and history, it wouldn’t have been possible to do a story focused around them without prominently featuring their faith. There are no doubting sisters, no agnostics, no “I’m more spiritual than religious” sisters. Their faith is their most prized possession. This fanaticism is partly what I think makes them great, and in some ways, believable. I’ve tried to lean into it as much as possible, as it explains both their tactics and their behavior on the battlefield. I’ve also tried to feature and touch on things like The Repentia, faith healing, and other of the more quirky yet powerful sides of their faith.

GP: What’s it like working with the Games Workshop team? What’s their input on the comic series?

TG: It’s been great! They’ve been extremely helpful during the entire process, from finding correct references to going over the scripts and pages to make sure everything holds up. 

GP: What has surprised you the most while working on this series?

TG: I’m not sure surprised is the correct word, but more… continually amazed by the wealth and depth of the Warhammer 40,000 universe. I’ve always been struck by the imagination and delight that’s gone into the miniatures and the level of detail you find in both the characters and the lore. (It’s one of my favorite things about painting minis – figuring out what all the little details are, who the character is and what that mean-looking weapon does.) I quickly found that same attention to detail in all the other aspects of the universe, too. Nothing is easy or straightforward in Warhammer 40,000, but that’s in part what makes it work so well. Take something like time; it would be impossible to make a universal time system that would work for all the star systems and worlds across the universe and still feel authentic, so they didn’t. Instead, we get the opportunity to make a time system that would make sense locally, which, though difficult, adds to the worldbuilding.

Movie Review: Saint Maud offers a disturbing portrayal of faith and loneliness

Saint Maud
Saint Maud

Pay attention to the title of the movie Saint Maud. Really think about what it is that makes someone a saint. In fact, if you look up some of the key saints from Christianity you’ll find the path to sainthood is often paved in blood. Be it through obscure instances of violence or culpable sin, the title of saint is still considered as an undertaking of absolute faith with the good grace of God standing as its ultimate reward.

Rose Glass Saint Maud looks at all this through a different lens, employing psychological horror to produce one of the most disturbing explorations of faith, devotion, and mental illness in recent memory.

Written and directed by Glass, Saint Maud follows a young, pious nurse called Maud as she comes to terms with the meaning of her relationship with God. In essence, Maud lives to answer the question of what God wants with her. As she looks for answers, she’s assigned to take care of a woman dying of cancer. Maud believes she can save the troubled woman’s soul, but God seems to have a harder test in the works for her.

The movie’s most resounding successes rest on the shoulders of actress Morfydd Clark, who plays Maud. Clark masterfully captures the title character’s tug and pull with being both hopeful and lost at the same time. Clark plays Maud as a young woman constantly teetering between a full-blown mental breakdown or a divine revelation.

Maud is given brief but revealing bits of internal dialogue that keeps viewers informed on the latest developments on what she thinks God is asking of her. Morfydd’s narration does a great job of showing Maud’s frustrations with her lack of understanding, always aware of the mounting pressure she faces while trying to make sense of her situation.

Saint Maud plays a bit with what’s real and what’s inside the main character’s head, but it prefers the less ambiguous approach to what’s actually happening. There’s more evidence of Maud suffering from a severe mental illness rather than a fundamental crisis of faith. And yet, it’s her faith that wins out as the thing that guides her in this new phase of life as a recent convert. Maud wasn’t always religious. There’s an obscure trauma at play that the movie cleverly keeps pretty much under wraps. It’s what might explain how God has so completely taken a hold over her.

Saint Maud
Saint Maud

The manifestations of her faith do one very unique thing here that not many other horror movies can claim to do. It makes the movie unfold as a kind of possession story where God is the invading spirit. Maud’s religious devotion plays a central role here as her decision to give in to faith keeps her isolated from almost everyone else.

Glass’ script is careful not to overindulge with the supernatural elements, but whenever something gives the appearance of being otherworldly, the horror gets ramped up considerably. Glass does an excellent job of playing with shadows and dark corners without stripping a single scene of all color. In fact, the movie contains a very clear and solid color palette that serves to heighten the terror at the heart of Maud’s process.

This figures into Glass’ decision to put Maud in big open spaces that aren’t exactly crowded with people. Quite the opposite. Maud seems to live in a world devoid of meaningful human contact. This becomes an especially powerful source of pain while in the presence of male characters, none of which see Maud as someone worth being treated with care or respect. Maud’s world is hostile and even God is suspect.

Saint Maud has a lot of moving parts, each made more complex and disturbing thanks to the fact the element of faith serves as its source of horror. Clark’s performance elevates the story’s focus on the consequences of unchecked piousness with an eye to question not just religious behavior but also the effects it can have on a troubled mind. As far as explorations into these matters are concerned, Saint Maud stands as one of its greatest.

Review: MIDNIGHT MASS masterfully turns religion into a matter of blood and devious faith

Midnight Mass

Religion and horror have never been known to be strange bedfellows. In fact, it can be argued they’re both cut from the same cloth, or at the very least that one can’t exist without the other. Mike Flanagan seems to find refuge in this idea as his latest Netflix series, Midnight Mass, turns to some of the Bible’s most terrifying passages to craft a 7-part story about how faith can turn the religiously devoted into desperate monsters trying to find meaning and purpose.

Midnight Mass is set in Crockett Island, a small piece of land separated from the mainland with a very reserved and quietly weary populace that has embraced their isolated experience. It’s the kind of place where despair and small-town politics breed a kind of people that can be easily manipulated by a charismatic enough figure. The island’s only saving grace is the common ground most of the inhabitants share on Sunday mornings: St. Patrick’s, a small catholic church.

Enter Father Paul (played by Hamish Linklater), a young and impassioned priest that’s ready to do whatever’s needed of him to bring more people into church, capital sins included. Problem is, Father Paul has brought something with him to the island, something monstruous, and it hungers.

While the series’ true north lies in the dangers of religious manipulation dressed as honest devotion, it isn’t content with just settling on the spiritual ailments plaguing the island’s residents. The story also explores grief, loss, the trials of being an outsider in a closed-off community, and alcoholism as problems religion can either alleviate or unintentionally replace with other addictions.

Midnight Mass
Hamish Linklater as Father Paul

Who says people can’t get intoxicated by the promise of receiving God’s most coveted blessings? The metaphor’s there and it’s expertly woven into the fabric of the horror at the series’ core.

Flanagan, who directs each episode and either fully scripts or co-writes them, is largely successful at turning religion into Midnight Mass’ primary source of terror by resorting to fiery Bible verses to create powerful connections between the horrible things that happen on the island and the contents of the holy book.

Father Paul’s sermons invite literal interpretations of some of Catholicism’s most potentially gruesome practices, if taken word for word. Deciphering this allows viewers to slowly piece together some of the story’s secrets and makes for some truly satisfying sequences where horror unfolds in new and inventive ways, especially when it comes to communion.

The setup and the character driven tempo of the story is where Midnight Mass excels. The island’s inhabitants only have themselves to contend with and it’s their willingness to either give in to the church or to question it that establishes the fear and tension surrounding Father Paul’s interest in turning Crockett Island’s inhabitants into fervent servers of God.

Midnight Mass
Samantha Sloyan as Bev Keane

One thing sometimes gets in the way of Midnight Mass’ already dialogue-heavy plot: individual character monologues. People familiar with Flanagan’s work, especially those that saw The Haunting of Hill House (2018), know that the director likes his horror to be sentimental, heavy-handedly so. To achieve that, Flanagan resorts far too often to long-winded monologues about faith, life after death, and the many philosophical meanings of life and they can grind the story to a halt.

In Midnight Mass, monologues surrounding Father Paul’s sermons or those of a particularly sinister character called Bev Keane (played by Samantha Sloyan), a zealous Catholic that can give the Old Testament a run for its money, are particularly interesting and intense. They’re some of the best parts of the story. Monologues relegated to what happens after death or about making amends are the opposite. They make their points early on and then they just keep going.

They open different avenues of conversation and feature some genuinely interesting ideas, but they’re too involved for their own good and they definitely overstay their welcome. Thankfully, the performances behind the characters delivering these monologues are excellent and they help sustain interest as the dialogue stretches on.

Rahul Kohli, who plays Sherrif Hassan, a practicing Muslim that has to navigate the town’s racism while also being the only resident that’s not Catholic in Crockett, does an admirable job of delivering each line with a force that commands attention. The rest of the cast follows suit, but they only alleviate some of the problems inherent in these monologues.

Midnight Mass
(From left to right) Annabeth Gish, Igby Rigney, Annarah Cymone, Kate Siegel, and Rahul Kohli

The story’s reveals, on the other hand, make each development feel monumental and prop up some of its most interesting characters for a series of profoundly heart-wrenching moments that are sure to stick around well after the credits have rolled on the final episode.

Taken in as a whole, Midnight Mass can more accurately be described as a work of horror drama. Flanagan isn’t afraid to spend time with his characters exploring themes that aren’t rooted in terror every step of the way. He prefers his horror slow-cooked, but once certain pieces have been set and the time comes to let the darkness take over, very few filmmakers can conjure up horror as unsettling or as disturbing as the kind in Midnight Mass.

Introducing Valiant Motion Comics: Watch Faith Episode #0 Part 1 Now!

Valiant Entertainment has revealed brand-new Motion Comics, and the debut episode is an adventure with the publisher’s most heroic and inspirational character: Faith

Discover the origin of Faith Herbert, aka Zephyr, and a tale with her first love and fellow Harbinger Renegade John Torkelson, aka Torque. The first episode is now live on Valiant Entertainment’s YouTube channel and you can watch the nearly eight-minute-long story unfold, below.

This animated episode is taken straight from the pages of Harbinger: Faith #0featuring a script by Joshua Dysart, artwork by Robert Gill and José Villarrubia, and letters by Dave Sharpe. Keep an eye on Valiant’s YouTube channel for Part 2 of the story and more Motion Comics featuring other characters from the Valiant Universe.

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