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Preview: The Forevers

The Forevers

Writer: Curt Pires / Artist: Eric Pfeiffer / Letterer: Colin Bell
Mature / $19.99 / 180 pages

Live fast. Live forever.
Five friends struggling on the brink of stardom sacrifice everything in a black magic pact that brings them all the wealth and glamour they ever wanted. But now, years later, the glow is fading. When one of them is killed in an accident, they each feel a pulse of magic rise in them. They realize the glow is spread evenly among the group, and if one dies that power is passed along to the rest. Suddenly, they are being hunted. One of them has decided to kill the rest and harness the remaining power.

As they search for the killer, each of The Forevers will be confronted by the macabre reality of the lengths people will go to be adored, to make sure the spotlight never fades.

From writer Curt Pires (Youth, Olympia, Wyrd, Pop) with Eric Pfeiffer and Colin Bell, the art team behind Arcadia, Curb Stomp, and Roche Limit.

The Forevers

Preview: Sweet Valley High – Academic All-Star? Original Graphic Novel

Sweet Valley High – Academic All-Star? Original Graphic Novel

writer: Katy Rex
artist: Devaki Neogi
cover: Devaki Neogi
FC | 112 pages | $14.99 | Teen+

When Jessica falls in love with her Shakespeare teacher, she begins to act like her studious twin sister Elizabeth to impress him. Now it’s up to Elizabeth to make sure that all’s well that end well – but with Jessica playing her role, will anyone be able to tell which twin is which?

The treasured series that has entertained generations and sold over 60 million books returns! Fans of the over 600 classic novels and spinoffs and the TV show will adore this charming graphic novel from rising star writer Katy Rex (Charmed Magic School, Jade Street Protection Services) and artist Devaki Neogi (The Skeptics, Curb Stomp). Sweet Valley High is also in development as a major motion picture.

Sweet Valley High – Academic All-Star? Original Graphic Novel

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 09/18/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Eternals: Thanos Rises #1 (Marvel)– Only in comics can you have a prehistoric battle between immortal beings astride dinosaurs and a Platonic dialogue all under the same covers as Kieron Gillen, Dustin Weaver, and Matthew Wilson show the ideological and physical roots of one of pop culture’s greatest villains, Thanos, in Eternals: Thanos Rises #1. The conflict at the core of this issue, and honestly at the Eternals as a whole in Gillen’s run, is if immortal beings whose goal is to defend a kind of status quo (the machine) can change even in the slightest way. This way is having children, and as one can guess, it doesn’t turn out great. Weaver and Wilson’s visuals bring the power and mythic quality of the best Jack Kirby stories while having their own unique and slightly askew approach to storytelling. They’re influenced by the King and not a cover band for him. Also, it’s just plain cool and additive to the whole vibe of the Eternals to have characters based on the ancient Greek pantheon partake in the very ancient Greek activity of a philosophical dialogue. Eternals: Thanos Rises #1 adds context and scope to Kieron Gillen’s work on Eternals and features him, Weaver, and Wilson working in an epic mode. Overall: 9.4 Verdict: Buy

Black’s Myth #3 (Ahoy)– Strummer and Ben’s hunt for their client’s missing silver bullets (Apparently they were forged from the 30 pieces of silver that Judas received for betraying his Lord and Savior, but you know how there things are.) takes them to many interesting destinations, including a vampire bar and occult bookstore that’s more than meets the eye. Eric Palicki and Wendell Cavalcanti keep the action and mystery going at a nice clip lulling readers into a false sense of security before escalating the plot with a wallop in the last few pages. Also, Calvacanti gets to show off his fight sequence chops and channels Frank Miller and Klaus Janson in a nine panel grid vampire beatdown that shows that Strummer still has a relish for violence and is more werewolf than detective. In Black’s Myth #3, the pace never drags, the patter is always snappy, and Eric Palicki and Wendell Cavalcanti really up the danger quotient. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Joker #7 (DC)– The shape of the conspiracy that Jim Gordon’s up against starts to slowly reveal itself in Joker #7 by James Tynion, Guillem March, and Arif Prianto. Like most issues of Joker, the book features multiple settings, narrators, and POVs as well as art styles from March, who does a James Bond/Avengers homage with Julia Pennyworth to tight grids and reflections in eye glasses as Gordon meets a potential new ally. He can get as much tension from a conversation as a silent martial arts fight aka Cassandra Cain in action. Joker #7 also features smart commentary about how the rest of the world sees Gotham (It hides social issues under masks and costumes.) and character moment payoffs like Pennyworth beating the shit out of some Bane theme park investors as payback for the villain killing her father back in the Tom King Batman run. One of the reveals that Tynion pulls is a little obvious (If keeping with his history on the Bat-family books), but I love the layered storyline he’s creating in this book that goes beyond a simple cat and mouse game. The Punchline backup from James Tynion, Sam Johns, and Sweeney Boo is quite entertaining as Harper Row tries to break out of prison creating an opportunity for clever layouts and a sense of urgency in that story’s plot. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra (IDW)– Mary Kenney, SL Gallant, Maria Keane, and Adam Guzowski turn in a celebration of the Queen of the Monsters in the one-shot Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra. Before the titular battle, Kenney does a good job fleshing out this comic’s protagonist, Mima, a photographer who’s supposed to be doing a puff piece on the Japanese military and ends up learning about Mothra’s captivity attempting to free her. Like the best kaiju stories, Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra ends up being a parable about how humanity cages nature and what we don’t understand instead of being curious like Mina, whose photojournalism career came out of a life time exploring the great outdoors with her parent. All is this is great, but Godzilla Rivals: vs. Mothra also has a curb stomp monster action courtesy of Gallant and Keane as Kenney shuts off the dialogue and captions and “lets them fight”. There is really clever use of Mothra’s cocoon and Godzilla’s nuclear breath, and the entire story ends up being a little bittersweet. This comic is a must-read if you like your kaiju fights with a side of emotional resonance. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Trial of Magneto #2 (Marvel)– Leah Williams, Lucas Werneck, and Edgar Delgado are back for another round of bombastic drama, action, and questionable morality. Trial of Magneto #2 adds the Avengers to the mix to complicate the murder investigation and also show how much Wanda Maximoff meant to the team as they share grief and space with the Krakoans. However, not everything is sunshine and daisies, and we get yet another Magneto vs. everyone fight scene like the previous issue. But Williams and Werneck switch things up by letting Northstar be angry when his husband Kyle is caught in the middle of things and is treated as less than by Magneto. Throw in an utterly chaotic last few pages plus couple moments that show how utterly morally bankrupt Krakoan leaders like Professor X and Emma Frost are, and you can see why Mystique (Who has a 1 panel cameo) wants to burn the place down. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 07/31/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Barbaric #2 (Vault)– Michael Moreci, Nate Gooden, and Addison Duke juggle fantasy tropes and shed more insight on our deuteragonist, the necromancer Soren in Barbaric #2. Unlike most barbarian stories, Moreci and Gooden create an alliance between Owen and Soren, and she opens up to him about being persecuted and shunned for abilities some might think are unnatural. However, she’s not 100% a goodie two shoes, which creates the real tension in the arc. Compared the previous issue, Barbaric #2 has more talking heads, but eventually, Nate Gooden and Addison Duke get to cut loose supernatural style with flurries of bodies and spirits and pinks and greens. This is a book that’s clever and self-aware and a high octane thrill ride, especially when the talking axe is involved. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Blue Flame #3 (Vault)– Although ostensibly a sci-fi/superhero comic, Blue Flame #3 is a portrayal of a man hanging by his last thread. Sam’s friends are dead, his sister and her husband are struggling with finances and have a baby on the way, and oh yeah, he has to make a case for the continued existence of Earth to extraterrestrials that would destroy it. (And the eco-fascist compromise of saving Earth, but not its inhabitants won’t cut it.) I love the contrast in visuals that Adam Gorham and K. Michael Russell bring to the table as Sam flies through lush planetscapes as Blue Flame and hangs out in disturbingly dingy bars in his civilian life. They and writer Christopher Cantwell keep hammering out a painful character study that bridges the world of cosmic and street level heroes. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Batman/Superman #20 (DC)– Gene Luen Yang, Ivan Reis, Danny Miki, and Sabine Rich continue to make this team-up series better than it has any business being. Batman/Superman’s Big Bad Auteur.io, a film exec/multiversal manipulator, has sent in perpetual second stringer Etrigan the Demon to wreck the perfect Superman reality, World of Tomorrow. Yang’s script is both clever and wholesome poking fun at the way Etrigan is used in DC Comics and also showing Superman, Batman, Robin, and some allies save the day and help people even in alternate realities. This whole series is pulpy goodness with a modern sensibility, and Reis matches this with artwork features complex, film strip layouts plus classic costumes and futuristic technology. Batman/Superman #20 continues to marry the digital and analog in the way the series looks, and how its characters are portrayed with the Internet being key to this issue’s plot. Finally, the main reason I love Batman/Superman is that Gene Luen Yang and Ivan Reis use the concept of the multiverse not just for bullshit continuity reasons, but to explore different sides of iconic characters and tell a fun adventure story to boot. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Icon and Rocket Season One #1 (DC/Milestone)– After an extended origin sequence that allows artist Doug Braithwaite to indulge his sci-fi side, Icon and Rocket Season One #1 is all about the War on Drugs. Seriously, I would bet money that Icon voted for Ronald Reagan if he even voted at all. Reginald Hudlin and Braithwaite tell Icon’s origin story and Rocket’s too in this first issue filled with drugs, a break-in, guns, and a Black superhero (Actually an alien) who seems above at all. It oddly feels like a early 1990s period piece (When the original Icon comic dropped) with digital coloring from Brad Anderson instead of a renewal of the characters for the 2020s/a new audience. However, Raquel Irvin’s heart for justice (and maybe a side of respectability politics) and everywoman charm means I’ll be giving issue two a try to see what Icon and Rocket’s team-up looks like in action. Overall: 7.0 Verdict: Read

Static Season One #2 (DC/Milestone)– Vita Ayala, ChrisCross, and Nikolas Draper-Ivey’s excellent reboot of Static continues in Static Season One #2 as Static must deal with the aftermath of bully Hotstreak burning down his family’s home and gets help from an unexpected source. The mind-meld of Ayala’s narration, ChrisCross’ layout, and Draper-Ivey manga infused, energy-filled pencils and colors make Static Season One of the best-looking superhero books on the stands. The family conflict is handled really well in this issue with Robert Hawkins running around the house to survey the damage and having an argument with his wife Sharon about Virgil getting checked out after he demonstrates his abilities. It shows Black skepticism about medical professional from different perspectives and also ties into the large narrative of superpowers hitting Dakota City. Throughout the issue, Ayala and Draper-Ivey do an excellent job of showing the mental and physical drain that Virgil’s power take on him and have him reach out to a new ally connected to the Inventors program he’s involved in. Static Season One #2 has it all: shonen fights, internal conflict, and connections to the larger story of the Dakotaverse that don’t overwhelm what’s going on in Virgil’s family and school. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Amazing Fantasy #1 (Marvel)– Kaare Andrews’ Amazing Fantasy is a mash-up of different genres, Marvel eras, and characters with one heart-rending final page. He does each key character (Captain America, Black Widow, Spider-Man) in a different art style before going full pulp when they end up on a mysterious island. Like the old comics and stories he’s riffing on, his writing is definitely on the verbose side and describes exactly what goes on in the panel, which can be a little annoying. However, it’s cool watching him move from shirtless Captain America wrestling dinosaurs to fully painted Natasha in the Red Room and Silver Age Spidey with style and ease. This series has a lot of mystery, potential, and darkness at its core. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Cable #12 (Marvel)– We say goodbye to Kid Cable in this week’s heartfelt shoot ’em up/series finale from Gerry Duggan and Phil Noto. Basically, Old Man and Kid Cable use the power of relationships to take down their evil clone, Stryfe. Duggan manages to taper off most of the loose ends while leaving a couple in play because time travel. As a character, Kid Cable initially seemed like a Quentin Quire knock-off to me. (It’s the telepathy/Stepford Cuckoo romance) However, Gerry Duggan and Noto gave him a unique part in Krakoa by strengthening his relationships with the Summers family, giving him a connection to Galador, and finally pouring on the fan-service by bringing in Deadpool and Domino in the final issues. The Stryfe arc may have stretched out a little too long, but Cable was a solid series helped in part by consistently gorgeous visuals from Phil Noto. He nails the mayhem of combat, but also can freeze for emotionally poignant ones like the Cables rejecting Stryfe’s request for amnesty on Krakoa. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Eternals #6 (Marvel)– Just when this book starts to feel like homework, Eternals pulls me in again. The first half of the book is a curb stomp with the Eternals taking down Thanos, but then their resurrection machine malfunctions, and they learn a disturbing truth about their roles in the world. Like his work on Journey into Mystery and many of his creator-owned titles, Kieron Gillen has used the first arc of a comic to break down readers’ perceptions of the characters while commenting on big things like life, death, and mortality. I also feel like I’ve gotten know the core group of Eternals quite well over the previous six issues, especially Sersi and Ikaris. (Poor Phastos!) On the visual side, Esad Ribic and Matthew Wilson bring some big action with blinding colors and dig into horror territory when we see the Eternals resurrected for the first time in the series. The fights might be cosmic, but these immortals truly have flaws. Overall: 8.1 Verdict: buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 04/11/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Joe H

Batman #107 (DC)** So having read nearly every contemporary Batman comic in existence, it is hard for a run to feel fresh in it’s mid stride but somehow this team has done it again. We open with Bruce in the clutches of Scarecrow dripping in paranoia and fear. We the reader are lead to believe that Scarecrow has access to Bruce’s thoughts and Bruce is desperately trying to push that out of his brain. He forces himself to remember and retrace the steps of this case and figure out his next move.
Here we are shown a few flashback scenes with Batman and Barbara operating as Oracle. I must say I really dig when Barbara is used in this fashion, it puts her above and beyond the rest of the caped Bat Fam and really puts her on par with Bruce. She lays out some cool new plans for a new transportable Bat Signal to let Gotham know that Batman is still watching out for them.
We also get a nice little scene of Harley Quinn dishing out some unhinged vigilante justice and I loved that as well.
One this book has in abundance is style. The art by Jimenez has so much flare to it and makes the panels feel like they are moving. It reads along so nicely and is a visual treat. He keeps improving every issue. The colors by Morey are so outstanding and bring these icons to life in spectacular fashion. At times it is the the best book on the market in coloring quality. Lastly Tynion IV keeps slowly adding to his Batman mythos without just throwing stuff at the wall to make it stick. Gotham feels so rich and deep with him at the helm. Even characters I was not crazy about at first like Ghostmaker is winning me over.
All in all another fun issue and I’m loving this direction of new but familiar at the same time. I am not in any rush to have a new team jump on this title and just want to see where it goes. “Just how will Bruce get out of this one?”
Story: 8 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Batman #107 (DC)– James Tynion, Jorge Jimenez, and Tomeu Morey draw pretty clear parallels between the COVID-19 pandemic and Scarecrow’s creeping threat on Gotham in Batman #107. He hasn’t pulled a fear gas attack just yet, but Gothamites are stocking up on gas masks while the mayor is announcing a curfew. Jimenez’s visuals touch a strong techno-horror note that complements Morey’s graffiti color palette and Clayton Cowles’ glitched out letters as an underfunded Batman, kind of Harley Quinn, and Oracle fight a war on many fronts against Scarecrow, the future creator of the Magistrate, and the Unsanity Collective, a kind of ecoterrorist utopian group. Batman #107 gives a good feel of the fear and paranoia pervading Gotham while taking the plot in a fun direction that involves subterfuge, not fisticuffs. Tynion and Ricardo Lopez-Ortiz’s Ghostmaker backup is pure enjoyment featuring garishly dressed assassins, a MMF threesome, stealth action, and one-liners. Ghostmaker is a bi, anti-billionaire James Bond, and I know that the Bat-books are overexposed, but I wouldn’t mind him having his own mini. Overall: 8.3 Verdict: Buy

The Swamp Thing #2 (DC)– Ram V, Mike Perkins, and Mike Spicer have Levi really come into his own as Swamp Thing in the second issue of this maxiseries. They explore hope and fear through this character and also look into the past when he became connected to the Green after he visited his dying father in India. Then, The Swamp Thing #2 adds the layer on top about the character and his title serving as a vehicle for contemporary anxieties like old straight white men being afraid of a new, multicultural world or the usual battle between corporations and the environment that has been its trademark in most Swamp Thing comics. However, Perkins and Spicer depict these through gorgeous art and layouts from double page spread montages with poetic narration from V to almost painted panels as the narrative reaches his climax, and Levi feels like Swamp Thing and not just some guy having nightmares in New York. Mike Perkins and Mike Spicer match their art style and color palette to each situation in The Swamp Thing #2 with Perkins’ usual photorealism making a comeback in the conversations between Levi and his friends that remind her of a certain botanist from Louisiana. The Swamp Thing #2 definitely has its nods to the previous volumes, but Ram V, Perkins, and Spicer are putting their own spin on the title with new sets of visual language as well as a fully developed arc for Levi. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Casual Fling #3 (AWA)– I think I’m really enjoying Jason Starr and Dalibor Talajic’s Casual Fling because it’s a rare erotic suspense story in the medium of single issue comics. Casual Fling #3 introduces us to Matt’s hacker friend Sensei, who gets the funniest lines in the issue, and definitely moves the plot along as they work together to find the masked man who had an affair with his wife Jennifer and then blackmailed her with a sex tape. However, there’s still for emotional moments with Jennifer trying to make things right and repair their damaged relationship as Matt wrestles with the fact that she was unfaithful and was a victim of revenge porn. Most of this comes out through Talajic’s facial acting during quiet scenes at Matt’s mom’s house between sequences of frenetic Hollywood style hacking and facial recognition software. Casual Fling #3 has all this plus ends on a twist/cliffhanger. It’s the thriller where you wish your flight/commute was just a little longer. Overall: 9.0 Verdict: Buy

Project Patron #1 (Aftershock)– What if Superman actually died in the “Death of Superman” storyline? Steve Orlando and Matthew Piazzalunga explore this idea with the serial numbers filed off in Project Patron #1. They go for full, straightforward superheroics in the beginning of the book with lantern jawed figure work from Piazzalunga before showing behind the curtain of the illusion that keeps the iconic hero going. This first issue mostly sets up the players o f Project Patron and their personalities as well as potential enemies. It didn’t hook me completely, but overall, Project Pactron #1 is a solid psychological look at superhero iconography. Overall: 7.6 Verdict: Read

Nocterra #2 (Image)– Scott Snyder, Tony Daniel, and Tomeu Morey’s Nocterra #2 isn’t a particular deep comic, but it’s an enjoyable post-apocalyptic road story meets family drama. Daniel gets to draw creepy monster, biker gangs, and of course, plenty of vehicle, but Nocterra also has flashbacks about its protagonist Val so he gets to showcase his improving skill with facial expressions and less blockbuster moments. The relationship between Val and her brother Emory really becomes meaningful in this second issue as she lies to him about things like heaven and hope when he’s a kid and keeps him more in the loop as an adult. The overrarching concept of this comic continues to be as wacky as ever (Darkness bad, literal light good), but Nocterra #2 is starting to build suspense and also contrasts Val and Emory’s relationship with their mysterious passengers. Overall: 7.9 Verdict: Buy

The Silver Coin #1 (Image)– The Silver Coin is a new anthology series from artist Michael Walsh and a rotating cast of writers. Chip Zdarsky is up first, and their issue is about the guitar player of a struggling bar band who starts using a mysterious silver coin as a pick. Of course, the band starts to sound good, but he becomes overwhelmed with hubris and the rest is history. The story of guitars and deals with the devil is almost as old as the genre itself, but Walsh brings a new level of emotion and intensity to the page with his linework, color palette, and hand lettering. Zdarsky adds the conflict between rock and disco while keep the narrative grounded. The band sounds good, but they don’t find fame and glory or anything. The Silver Coin is off to an auspicious start, and I’m excited to see Michael Walsh and his collaborators’ takes on different genres and the connections between them in the months to come. Overall: 9.0 Verdict Buy

America Chavez: Made in the USA #2 (Marvel)– Kalinda Vazquez continue to provide insight into America Chavez’s past and show her strained relationship with her adoptive family, the Santanas of Washington Heights. America’s memories about her moms and the Utopian Parallel all return in one elementary school crayon drawing, and the flashbacks show her early vigilante activities as she wants to embrace that part of herself. This strain continues to the present day with America’s adoptive dad Javi confronting her and saying she wants to be there for everyone except for her family. The family stuff in America is really engaging, but the mystery stuff: not so much. We do get to see Kate Bishop eat a very spicy taco and coach America on her P.I. technique as Gomez finds delight in both big family gatherings and interdimensional superhero curb stomps. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Marauders #19 (Marvel)– Marauders finally lives up to its roots with Morlocks and Reavers fighting in the streets of Madripoor. If you’re a Marrow, Callisto, or Masque fan, then you’ll really enjoy this issue of Gerry Duggan and Stefano Caselli’s series as the Marauders are grounded by potential UN sanctions so they send in the Morlocks to do their dirty work. (Bishop gets involved though.) There’s a lot of action (and a little bit of drinking) in this issue, and it’s all very cathartic for the “Mutant Massacre”. Nothing beats rich kids getting their asses handed to them, and it’s nice to see the Morlocks play an active role in the new status quo. However, with the exception of Callisto, they’ll probably be sidelined. Even in a so-called utopia, class distinctions exist, and Marauders #19 is a reminder of this as the Morlocks clean up the Marauders’ mess in “Lowtown”. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Crime Syndicate #2 (DC Comics) – There’s a lot of potential in this series which takes us to the Earth where heroes are evil versions of the ones we know. But, these first two issues that have an attack by Starro has been a bit lackluster. The art hasn’t been inspiring and the comic has a bit of a comedic tone which feels rather off for this type of story. This is one that’s just not clicking for me. A backup story featuring the origin of Owlman though is pretty good and much more of what’s expected, it’s the second time the backup story has outshined the main feature. Overall Rating: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Far Sector #11 (DC Comics/DC’s Young Animal) – The series begins to wrap up with a rather convoluted and a bit too complicated series of double-crosses and agendas clashing. This issue and the previous one have a bit of a stumble for what has been an amazing series up to this point. As soon as the series shifted from its amazing discussion of social issues and politics, its shine wore off a bit. Still good, but this is one that’ll come together in the finale. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Preview: Curb Stomp TP

Curb Stomp TP

Writer: Ryan Ferrier
Artist: Devaki Neogi

Three gangs. Five girls. No way out. Machete Betty leads a small gang of women under the self-appointed task of protecting their home of Old Beach, one of three boroughs surrounding a rich metropolitan city. When Betty takes the life of a rival gang member in an act of self-defense, she sets off a chain reaction of retaliation, gang warfare, and unlikely allies. It’s up to the The Fever—Machete Betty, Derby Girl, Bloody Mary, Daisy Chain, and Violet Volt—to defend their turf at all costs. Collects the complete four-issue limited series.

CurbStomp_TP_cover

Preview: Curb Stomp #4 (of 4)

Curb Stomp #4 (of 4)

Author: Ryan Ferrier
Artist: Devaki Neogi

It’s the final showdown! The battle for Old Beach is on as the cops, The Wrath, and The Fever go head-to-head. Betty and her crew might be outnumbered, but they’ll fight to the death to defend their town.

CurbStomp_004_A_Main

Listen to Tini Howard and Devaki Neogi Talk The Skeptics on Demand

On demand: iTunes ¦ Sound Cloud ¦ Stitcher ¦ Listed on podcastdirectory.com

On this episode of Graphic Policy Radio Tini Howard and Devaki Neogi join us to talk about their brand new comic book series The Skeptics from Black Mask Studios.

The Skeptics is a stylish, political adventure about a pair of hip, clever teens who fool the world into believing they have superpowers. It is the 1960s. The Russians have the A-bomb, the H-bomb, and now the most terrifying weapon of all: a pair of psychically superpowered young people. Terrified and desperate, the US top brass scours from coast to coast in search of psychic Americans. Enter Dr. Isobel Santaclara, an eccentric illusionist and grifter who has recruited two teenagers and trained them to trick the US government, the Russians, and the whole world into believing they are dangerous psychics. The Skeptics is a pre-punk period piece, a sort of honest, unfuzzy, non-nostalgic look at the Cold War in DC.

Writer Tini Howard debuted as a contributor to the hugely successful Kickstarter The Secret Loves Of Geek Girls and was a winner of the Top Cow Talent Hunt before co-creating The Skeptics. She is also currently killing it on Power Rangers: Pink, Magdalena, & she is 1/3 of the Black Mask Witches.

Artist Devaki Neogi is a self-taught illustrator with a background in fashion who rose to power when she crushed it on the mini-series Curb Stomp. She joined the Black Mask Family with her beloved Kim & Kim covers before co-creating The Skeptics.

Tini Howard and Devaki Neogi Talk The Skeptics LIVE Tonight

the-skeptics-1-7On this episode of Graphic Policy Radio Tini Howard and Devaki Neogi join us to talk about their brand new comic book series The Skeptics from Black Mask Studios.

The show airs LIVE this Tuesday at 10pm ET.

The Skeptics is a stylish, political adventure about a pair of hip, clever teens who fool the world into believing they have superpowers. It is the 1960s. The Russians have the A-bomb, the H-bomb, and now the most terrifying weapon of all: a pair of psychically superpowered young people. Terrified and desperate, the US top brass scours from coast to coast in search of psychic Americans. Enter Dr. Isobel Santaclara, an eccentric illusionist and grifter who has recruited two teenagers and trained them to trick the US government, the Russians, and the whole world into believing they are dangerous psychics. The Skeptics is a pre-punk period piece, a sort of honest, unfuzzy, non-nostalgic look at the Cold War in DC.

Writer Tini Howard debuted as a contributor to the hugely successful Kickstarter The Secret Loves Of Geek Girls and was a winner of the Top Cow Talent Hunt before co-creating The Skeptics. She is also currently killing it on Power Rangers: Pink, Magdalena, & she is 1/3 of the Black Mask Witches.

Artist Devaki Neogi is a self-taught illustrator with a background in fashion who rose to power when she crushed it on the mini-series Curb Stomp. She joined the Black Mask Family with her beloved Kim & Kim covers before co-creating The Skeptics.

We’ll discuss all that and more on this brand new episode. We want to hear from you! Tweet us your questions @graphicpolicy.

Listen in as the show airs live tonight.

Preview: Curb Stomp #3 (of 4)

Curb Stomp #3 (of 4)

Author: Ryan Ferrier
Artist: Devaki Neogi

The people of Old Beach have turned on the Fever, and old alliances have crumbled in the wake of the gang war. Beaten and bruised, Betty and the Fever will have to band together to face the Wrath and deal with an unexpected tragedy.

CurbStomp_003_A_Main

Zeismic
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