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Leaving the Comics Classroom

A few weeks ago I ended my career in teaching. For the last nine years, I’ve taught high school English. For the last three, I taught a graphic novel class I’d created. In both contexts, I’d had times of triumph and feelings of frustration. Ultimately the frustrations won out and I decided to switch careers. Truthfully, the last couple of years of teaching I wanted out. I didn’t know what I wanted to do: I was looking for a career that also felt like a calling. Eventually, I decided that I needed a job that was better than teaching. Already I have my own calling with my writing.

While I have many reflections on teaching in general, I’m not going to cover them here. That would take a whole book. Instead, I’m going to focus on what’s more relevant to this site, my reflections on teaching graphic novels to teens. It’s something I’ve done previously (here and here). I’ve had some great success in the class. Some crushing failures. And, a whole lot of approaches that–like a lot of teaching curriculum–were okay. It pushed students to produce good work that they weren’t generally passionate about. They did well for their abilities.

The biggest success carried across all years teaching this class. Most students didn’t take the class because they were passionate about comics. In fact, most students taking the class hadn’t read comics recreationally at all, unless we count their time reading the Sunday comics. And, even then, most had only done that a few times. Most of these students came into the class thinking that comics weren’t for them. Partly because they equated superheroes with comics. They just took the class because it sounded easier than the other English elective options they had to choose from. 

This attitude was a source of one of my frustrations. Ultimately, it also paved the way for one of the biggest successes. At the end of each semester, every student became more open to comics. Every student saw that superheroes were a genre within the medium and that to equate comics with superheroes was foolish. Even more rewarding, almost every student ended up liking comics. Not everyone we read but comics in general. Almost every student said they preferred reading comics to traditional texts. If my aim was to convert students and help them love comics (and that was part of it, of course), I was certainly more successful at that than helping students love reading books in my other classes.

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While they liked reading comics in general, they didn’t always like the comics that I thought were great. Years of teaching traditional books had prepared me in part for that. I was still somewhat shocked that many students didn’t appreciate Maus, one of our whole-class reads. Even more surprising and frustrating, though, was that sometimes students didn’t like a book club graphic novel they’d picked. Granted, they picked it out of a narrow choice of 15 or so graphic novels.

I would’ve thought more students would have liked Blankets or Watchmen, especially since they were texts that needed parent/guardian approval and had the time of edgy material I thought teens would like. Perhaps the most disappointing aspect of this was when students didn’t even choose to read some graphic novels that are truly great: Linda Medley’s fantastic Castle Waiting only had one student read it in all three years, the other copies lying lonely on the bookshelf; Jessica Abel’s illuminating Out on the Wire also only had one student read it in that same time, making me think less of my students and regret having the school purchase these texts. At the end of the day, though, those two students like them, and most students liked their other selections, so I take heart in that.

When I envisioned this course, I pictured students who wanted to analyze comics on a granular level. Students who spouted comics jargon from academic perspectives like Will Eisner’s Comics and Sequential Art, Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics, and Jessica Abel and Matt Madden’s Writing Words and Drawing Pictures. What was I thinking? Students didn’t like using academic language to analyze traditional texts, wanting to stick to their own dialect in crafting responses. And that’s if they were even willing to read and discuss those texts!

Each year of teaching the comics class, I realized this trend held true for discussing comics. I liked thinking and talking about comics with Eisner’s thoughts about framing, McCloud’s panel transition types, and Abel and Madden’s thoughts on pacing. Students generally couldn’t care less whether it was a Moment-to-Moment or Action-to-Action panel. They only cared about if they liked the comic and if it connected with them on a personal level. It took a while for me to let go of my initial utopian vision of this class. Eventually, I started using less of these readings.

I still thought it was important to study some essential concepts. The panel transitions and panel types from McCloud were important to learn. Even if we didn’t use that language most of the time. There were some concepts that got too granular. I decided I could only make students read half of Understanding Comics instead of the whole thing. Eisner and Abel became options. The best creative analysis came from engaging in the process itself rather than abstractly discussing it to death. When we had to discuss graphic novels and the process–students would have better analysis of the creative process by discussing it with graphic novels they liked, with stories that resonated with them.

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Seeing these trends, this past year I shifted the order and curriculum of the class, leading to yet another success. Before, we’d start with reading the original version of Metamorphosis and then Peter Kuper’s version to compare and contrast. While the aim of that unit worked–to show students how graphic novels differed from novels and other traditional texts, it never hooked students.

These were consistently students’ least favorite texts. Kafka’s original was definitely disliked much more than the graphic novel version, if only because it was denser and took longer to read. Still seeing some value in studying these two texts, I moved them to the last unit. It was a unit that focused on adaptations (prose to comics, movies to comics, etc…) and decided to only read excerpts from the two, so that we gained the knowledge from our study without losing engagement (too much, at least).  This was also a good move since it aligned with our study of Persepolis. It was a study that had involved comparing and contrasting the graphic novel with the movie adaptation in a Socratic Seminar.

With that move made, the beginning of the year opened up: I decided to open it up to complete choice, giving students options from my classroom library (full of about 75 or more graphic novels) along with the school library. Students were more engaged in their texts than I’d ever seen, in that class or any other. They might not have liked to do activities, about their comics (because, after all, it’s work and most teens don’t like work–plus, analyzing texts isn’t something most people like to do, something that often kills the joy of reading in students and adults alike).

Part of this unit also entailed reading conferences, one-on-one discussions with me about their graphic novels. This is where I truly saw the passion in students for what they were reading, and the most ownership over thinking about their graphic novels. For those in the know, for those who know education theory and edu-babble, I had essentially implemented a Reader’s Workshop approach at the end of the year, something that largely worked (although, I’ll admit, I dropped conferencing after awhile, due to it taking too much time).

The Reader’s Workshop model is also often paired with the Writer’s Workshop model (something I did in my other classes where we read traditional texts and did more writing), but I knew I needed a different structure for the graphic novel class. I needed to create a Cartoonist’s Workshop, to focus on developing students’ abilities to create comics in traditional and digital ways. 

Now, I’d already done this to some degree. In the first two years, I’d had a running series of Behind the Scenes days where we went into a Mac Lab to explore different aspects of creating comics in Adobe Illustrator (after we’d spent a few days in the room thinking about creating plot and writing scripts). The idea was that students would have brainstormed a plot, written a page of its script, and then built off that story and concept in Adobe Illustrator as we learned to pencil, ink, color, and letter. I always gave students the option to start a new story, since that’s sometimes the creative process, but the students who did the best work often followed their initial idea through the whole semester.

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Part of what made this approach different than the Cartoonist’s Workshop, though, is that we practiced these skills less in general, and we practiced these skills mainly in digital formats instead of letting students go old-school with pencil, pen, and paper. Another difference was simply in its timing and my own comic-creating knowledge. The first year, I’d only released a few issues of Rebirth of the Gangster, so my knowledge of some aspects of Adobe Illustrator and comic-creation was limited. As a result, I linked to a lot of video tutorials and websites to supplement students in their activities, giving them many resources to choose from, but this freedom became a double-edged sword. 

Students that were passionate about the process chose the best, yet most thorough and time-consuming resources, and produced the best final projects-at the end of the semester (a six- page comic about anything, something that also gave students the freedom to fly high or crawl). And these projects were better than the ones my last year when I used the Cartoonist’s Workshop approach. But other students wanted more guidance, or lacked the passion to utilize the best resources, and they produced some of the worst projects I’d seen in my whole time teaching the class.

The more I created comics, though, and the more I helped students problem solve their own digital comics, the better creator I became, one of the best (and most selfish) successes of teaching this class. Truly, if this class had been good for nothing else, I would appreciate teaching it because it made me evaluate my creative process, refining it even more because I wasn’t just thinking about creating comics after class ended. 

Becoming a better creator was the biggest step in preparing me for switching to the Cartoonist’s Workshop in my final year. It was an approach that led to better overall products from the average student if less spectacular ones by outliers. The shorter ceiling was probably because of the shift in the requirements for the last project. Not because I became a worse teacher for those few passionate student creators. Instead of giving students complete freedom to create any six-page comic, I had them create a six-page comic adapting anything. It could be a scene from a TV show, a movie, a song, a chapter, a whole fairy tale. They had a foundation to build off of instead of coming up with their own ideas.

Most students created better comics. They could focus on style, pacing, and other aesthetics since the content was already made for them. However, since the content wasn’t their own, that did stem some students’ creativity and passion; instead of applying solid craft to a personal vision of their own, they only had the craft.

Raising the floor of my students’ creative abilities was due in part because I was a better creator. But (humility aside), it probably had more to do with the fact that I had students keep a Cartoonist’s section in their notebooks. That lead to a lot more old-school comics. Students got more practice in creating comics and became engaged in the class since they were now creating more and discussing reading less. Most students might not have had a personal vision for the final project this year. But they had mastered more of their craft. That lead to a better comic from most students. On some level, this paralleled my journey in this course. I had lost my passion for teaching (teaching in general, and teaching comics to some degree). I had gained a stronger foundation of knowledge and a higher level of craft.

When I closed the door on my comics classroom the last time a few weeks ago, I walked to the staff parking lot with mixed emotions. I would miss the passion from the few students who wanted to create at a high level. I’d miss the evolution of students’ perception of, and enjoyment of, comics. I would miss the ability to refine my own creative process. But I wouldn’t miss the disengaged student taking the class for an easy D. The ones who just wanted to pass and graduate high school; I wouldn’t miss the students casting shade on some of my favorite reads; and I wouldn’t miss having to murder my darlings, to spend less and less time on the analytical texts. 

Comics Classroom

The control freak in me also despaired that the class wouldn’t end with me; another teacher would pick up the reins and steer future students down this trail. In some ways, I felt like Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby must’ve felt. We had done our work-for-hire, but now we had to see our creations move on in the hands of others. At the same time, I’m excited for the teacher who’s taking on the course and for the students who will be graced with his different vision. After all, in work-for-hire scenarios and creations, the creator isn’t always the best fit for every audience member. Some might glorify the Lee/Kirby years of the Fantastic Four; some might prefer John Byrne’s; Hickman’s run might resonate with others.

Comics Classroom

Ultimately, any great creation will have its ups and downs and will be received differently by different people. That’s the way life goes, and its only fitting that that’s the way a comics classroom rolls too. 


CJ Standal is a writer and self-publisher.  He is co-creator of Rebirth of the Gangster, which has been featured in Alterna Comics’ 2017 IF Anthology; he has lettered the webcomic Henshin Man; and he has written for online sites like Graphic Policy and the now-defunct Slant.  Follow him on Twitter and Instagram (@cj_standal), Facebook, and visit his website: cjstandalproductions.com.

Comics in the Classroom Revisited: Looking on the Sunnier Side of Teaching Graphic Novels

*Note–Last semester, I wrote a piece reflecting on my experience teaching a graphic novel class, which you can read here.  This piece returns to that topic but updates it with the experiences of a new semester and group of students.  Further note: all of the artwork shown in this post is from my students this semester.*

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This semester, like last semester–when my students have been working on creating their own comics or in groups analyzing the comics we read in class–anytime I asked if students needed any help, I’ve been met with a wall of silence.  Unlike last semester, though, this wall of silence was built for a different reason: whereas last semester my students were being stubbornly silent because they didn’t want to engage in any of the work, this semester my students are so into their work that they don’t respond.  But make no mistake–my students this semester will ask questions and engage in deep discussion, just on their own terms and pace.  And for this reason, this semester of teaching comics has been a night and day difference from my experience last semester.

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Last semester, I had only about five students who were passionate about comics and were often restrained in those passions by the rest of the class, students who didn’t care about effort, let alone comics.  This semester, most of my students are passionate about comics in some way (even if they don’t like Persepolis or Kuper’s adaptation of Metamorphosis), and maybe more importantly, have an intellectual curiosity that sparks genuine discussion.

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Questions that would meet with a half-hearted sentence last semester, give birth to an authentic discussion that often pushed other questions from the agenda, simply because we wouldn’t have enough time to get to all of them.  When I brought in a student teacher who was born and grew up in Iran to speak to the class about her experience and add insight to our reading of Satrapi’s memoir, my class’s eyes and ears were all glued to her.  They didn’t ask many questions, but the ones they did ask were thoughtful and genuine.

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This semester, my students have jumped into not just one choice book (like my students last semester did) but two.  And not only that, but their discussions and presentations for this choice book have been more detailed and clearly passionate.  I even had one student who checked out all Nausicaa graphic novels within one week (even though only the first was required for a choice book).  To a lesser degree, this happened with my other copies of Wandering Son and Bone.  And showing that this passion doesn’t restrict itself to my graphic novel class, I have a student who is reading Nimona for a book talk in my AP Language and Composition class, plus Dan Slott’s She Hulk for the second choice book in my graphic novel class.

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But what has impressed me the most has been the effort my students have put into making their own comics.  They each have different levels of quality on the product, some drawing in more detail than others and creating work that “looks” better,  but every student has bought into the process and created some great storytelling, despite differences in their ability to “draw well”.  And they’ve created work of such variety: ranging from a heartbreaking look at bullying to a light-hearted story of a crab stowing away on a  plane and getting lost as a result–I haven’t read the next part of his adventure, finding home, but I’m sure it’s just as engaging as the first one was and just as engaging as the student creating a dystopian society where everyone is literally connected to an online network.  

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Just as impressive, the variety my students have brought to their stories has also transferred to a variety of storytelling devices not seen from my first semester students.  Instead of coloring a whole piece, I have some students selectively coloring parts of their page to emphasize certain details or moods, almost like Spielberg did in Schindler’s List.  Without showing Fables to any of my students, I have had a student create Buckingham-like borders on each side of the page, a move that might not show more of the story but definitely creates a stronger tone and aesthetic experience.  And examples like this are just the tip of the creative iceberg floating in my class this semester.

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This creative experimentation is something that has also freed me up to experiment with my own comic, Rebirth of the Gangster.  Although I was always pushing myself creatively, as you can see in my first piece about creating the comic, I’ve recently started experimenting with less linear layouts, making my comic feel less like storyboards and more like a, well, like a comic.  While I’m sure some of this evolution in my own process is something that happens naturally, I’m also sure that a big part of it has been watching the many different processes and products my students have shown me this semester.  Just like the ideal classroom, I’m learning as much from my students as they are from me.  And even though I’ve been pretty pessimistic about my class last semester, one of my strong students from last semester (who I also learned a lot from)  is returning next year for an independent study with me.  I’m sure I’ll learn a lot from working with a student one-on-one, especially since I have some new approaches revealed by my students this semester.

In short, my gloomy summary and prediction of teaching graphic novels last semester has faded to a bright and sunny outlook this semester.  Some of this might be attributed to better teaching on my part (I did cut out some parts of the class that didn’t work last semester and streamline others that did but went on for too long) but to be honest, most of this change is a result of the change in students and better mix of individuals to create a strong classroom community.  But that’s teaching in a nutshell for you.  Even though classes always have their ups and downs across semesters and different groupings of students, I hope to keep this high point (and maybe even scale to new heights) next year.  What can I say?  I love the view–I just hope it stays this way for a long time.  

Creators Corner: Opening the Doors to Comics in the Classroom

As a life-long comics fan, I’ve always tried to remove the blinders from people’s eyes and make them see the value of comics, to open the doors that prevented them from entering into this new and wonderful world. In grade school, I strong-armed my friends into taking trips to the comics store with me. In middle school, I took a brief detour and closed the doors on comics–finding yourself and accepting yourself in middle school is hard enough without having to embrace the label of “Comic Geek,” especially since most people’s frame of reference for comic fans at the time was The Simpson’s Comic Book Guy.

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Eventually, in high school, I grew tired of having this secret identity and would proudly proclaim my love of comics, shoving comics into the hands of friends based on interest. A friend liked the action, intrigue and conspiracies of the Bourne books–check out 100 Bullets. A friend already liked Neil Gaiman’s prose work–check out Sandman. A friend and I connected over our shared love of the 90s X-Men cartoon series–check out this other cool X-Men thing from the 90s called Age of Apocalypse. The doors were starting to open again, but I had more than a few friends who slammed it shut in my face.

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Now that I’m a high school English teacher, I still want to open the doors so more people can enjoy the great world of comics, but I have some different methods. At first, it started off as offering Maus as an alternative to another concentration camp book, Night. Then, it branched into having students use online comic creator programs like Pixton to showcase knowledge of theme in a text we read. But these only opened a few doors for the few students in my class who wanted to explore new rooms. It was time to try something else.

Three years ago, I decided that it was time to propose a graphic novel class. I’d had a taste of the engagement that comics can build in students, and I wanted more, but I wanted to see this happen every day for every student in a class. I spent a frenetic weekend poring over my district’s new course proposal requirements, filling out the documents, asking for feedback from other teachers who had proposed a class before, and then revising those documents based on their feedback. I might have been dead to the outside world, but I was creating a new world for a new classroom. Unfortunately, for various reasons having to do with district politics, all of our English department proposals were rejected, graphic novel included. I’d glimpsed some light through a crack in the door, but just when I was about to cross the threshold, the door was slammed in my face. Again.

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Two years ago, I made slight changes and then sent it to be approved. But our district had changed the course proposal requirements, allowing only one department to add new classes per year, and it was again rejected, because it wasn’t our department’s turn. The door remained closed.

Finally, a year ago, they opened the door (not just to my class, but to our department’s eight other new classes). I spent that year ironing out any kinks any the course, and so that I could speak more to the creative process of making a comic, I started self-publishing my thriller comic Rebirth of the Gangster (shameless plug–it’s on sale on Amazon, and it’s like Breaking Bad meets The Wire with a shot of Shakespearean drama and debt to Othello). The year passed, I’d adjusted some of the choice texts for the class, and I’d released the first three issues of my series, and I entered my classroom doors at the beginning of September, ready to unlock student’s passion for comics.

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But that didn’t pan out quite like I hoped.

Sure, there were students who had read plenty of comics (especially manga, often from students who were in the anime club I advise). And those students entered my class with the same curiosity and commitment I would’ve entered a similar class if it had existed when I went to high school. They saw something worthwhile in every comic we read, even the more abstract Understanding Comics that tripped up many other students. They poured sweat into every Behind the Scenes activity we did, even if they only cared about the writing part of the comic creating process or if they only cared about the penciling, inking, coloring, or lettering we focused on in other BTS lessons. They would often offer insights in class discussion that I hadn’t thought of, prompting other students to become more engaged in the stories we read. And when the end of the semester came, and they had to create some aspect of a 6-page comic, they worked for their own growth, not for a grade. They created something that not only earned an A; it earned my gratitude and pride. These students saw an open door and jumped through it, never looking back.

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But these students only counted for about ¼ of my class. The rest of my class didn’t care about comics, and even more worrisome, didn’t care to put in work when asked. They took my class because they thought it would be an easy A. “It’d be less work, and even if I have to read, reading comics is easier” is what they all told me. Comics might have become legitimate enough to have a class all their own, but people’s perceptions weren’t changed that quickly, and comics still weren’t seen as legitimate or as deep as other media. At least they were honest.

Sometimes this didn’t matter. My students who had opened the door and started exploring every nook and cranny of these new rooms would often carry discussion, pulling some of these students in. And even when they didn’t pull other students in, talking with those students about comics–learning from them as they were learning from me–often made my day. But on those days when they didn’t carry conversations, class would drag, and it would weigh on me more than any of my other classes. I began to dread this class.

And I think my students could tell, but they didn’t change. In fact, many students got even lazier. It got to the point that one of my students lost their job, because his parents wouldn’t let him work when he was failing my class. I’ve taught for seven years, and that was a first for me. This student even admitted he only failed because he didn’t care enough about the class to try, but his behavior didn’t change. He closed the door, and even when he was standing in a hallway on fire, he refused to open it.

I got so sick of this that I had an extensive heart-to-heart with my class. I talked about how I had more Fs in that class than the rest of my classes combined. I talked about how comics were my greatest passion, but that this class’s attitude was making me dislike my greatest passion. I talked about how something similar had happened when I taught a hip hop class, and that I needed to take a break from teaching that class because of the lack of passion from my students, not because I didn’t love hip hop. And I told them that unless things changed, the same thing was going to happen here: I’d teach this course for a year and then abandon it in the same way I felt that most of my students had abandoned my jewel, the class I had worked harder on than the AP classes I teach.

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I don’t know if it was this talk, or if it was just that many of my students put in a last-ditch effort to avoid an F for the semester in this class. Whatever it was, over the last two months of this class, I began to see more effort and curiosity from my students. Part of this could have to do with reading a choice graphic novel in the last part of the semester: as much as I love Kuper’s Metamorphosis, Spiegelman’s Maus, and Satrapi’s Persepolis, I definitely know that other comics would draw them into this world of panels and gutters more effectively (choice texts like Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, Wandering Son, Nausicaa, March, and more). Once they got their hands on a graphic novel they chose, they creaked open the door and took a few steps into this new room: not everybody, but more than I had seen up to that point.

Ultimately, by the end of the semester, I no longer dreaded teaching this class. But I didn’t love it as much as I thought I would when I’d spent the previous years and summer hammering away at a keyboard, chiseling out curriculum. It had become like any other class I taught: full of some fun heights and some frustrating lows and a whole lot of boring middle ground.

Yes, I found a way to open the door to a new generation of comics readers, but I didn’t figure out a way to have them walk through that door. But then again, isn’t that the case with any subject in school? And if many of my graphic novel students are treating my class like they do other classes, that surely should be a sign that comics are gaining that legitimacy I always wanted. As it is with any other subject, the doors are open, and it’s all on the individual if they decide to explore that room or not, if they decide to make this pit stop or continue on their path. Finally, no one will slam these doors in their face like I had them slammed in mine. And that’s a step in the right direction even if the finish line still isn’t in sight.

All-Ages Comic Anthology Featuring Jill Thompson and Fred Van Lente Raises Money to Bring Comics into the Classroom

Official Press Release
Reading With PicturesChicago, IL February, 2010—Beginning February 22 and running through May 22, the educational non-profit Reading With Pictures will be taking orders for its all-ages comic anthology on Kickstarter.com (http://kck.st/a2LVJy). The full-color, 192-page anthology features a cover by Jill Thompson (The Sandman) and all-new stories by more than 50 cartoonists including Fred Van Lente (Amazing Spider-Man), Jeffrey Brown (Sulk), Jim Gownley (Amelia Rules), Raina Telgemeier (The Baby-Sitter’s Club), Chris Giarrusso (Mini-Marvels), Eric Wight (Frankie Pickle), the Fillbach Brothers (Star Wars: The Clone Wars) and RWP Executive Director Josh Elder (Mail Order Ninja).

In addition to selling signed softcover and limited-edition hardcover editions of the anthology, Reading With Pictures is offering several unique opportunities for high-level donors to live the dream and become comic book characters by being drawn into the anthology by their favorite artists. Other incentive packages include digital downloads and bulk-rate discounts for teachers and librarians.

“I believe in bringing comics into the classroom because comics were my ‘secret weapons’ in school,” says Executive Director Josh Elder. “All the creators involved in this anthology volunteered their time and considerable talents because they believe it too. Comics made us all better students, better citizens and better people, and we know they can do the same for everyone.”

The anthology centers around the theme of education, and each story contains engaging and entertaining educational content. Trevor Mueller and Gabriel Bautista tell the story of alien exchange student and his human classmates traveling back in time to learn about dinosaurs firsthand. In Kevin Pyle’s “The Order of the Secret Pencil,” a boy learns to read and write through the use of comics. The sciences are also represented along with the humanities when Chris Eliopoulos, an animation director for Yo Gabba Gabba! on Nick Jr., explains the unique biology of the electric eel.

Money raised from sales of the anthology will pay for the printing of the anthology itself and provide the majority of funding for Reading With Pictures during its critical startup period. That funding will allow Reading With Pictures to forge ahead with its ambitious slate of groundbreaking projects to revolutionize the use of comics in the classroom. These include a partnering with Northwestern University to conduct the most comprehensive research study in U.S. history on comics as educational tools, creating a searchable, interactive database of comic-centric curriculum and providing recommended reading lists for all ages, interests and subjects.

Reading With Pictures’ Executive Director Josh Elder and all anthology creators are available for interview. High-resolution images from the anthology will also be made available upon request. For more information, please contact Media Director Michael Moreci or visit our Kickstarter site (http://kck.st/a2LVJy) for all the latest news, previews, and updates.

WHO WE ARE

Reading With Pictures was founded in 2009 by award-winning graphic novelist and nationally syndicated cartoonist Josh Elder in order to revolutionize the role of comics in education. The organization has since grown to comprise eight board members drawn from publishing and academia, including John Shableski, Sales Manager for Diamond Book Distributors, and David Rapp, an Associate Professor of Learning Sciences and Cognitive Psychology at Northwestern University. We also engage the talents of more than 60 active volunteers from all over the world in various capacities.

At Reading With Pictures, we believe that comics have the potential to be more engaging, more efficient and more effective educational tools than traditional classroom materials. We believe it because we’ve experienced it in our own lives. Comics made us better students, better citizens and better people. Now we hope to share those experiences with pupils in every city, in every school and in every classroom.

OUR PLANNED PROJECTS

  • Partnering with Northwestern University and other academic institutions to oversee the largest and most comprehensive research study in U.S. history on the role of comics in education
  • Building an interactive database of research papers, lesson plans and comic-centric curriculum
  • Providing educational consultation services to schools and publishers
  • Working with cartoonists to produce top-quality educational comics
  • Helping universities design courses in the burgeoning field of Comics Studies
  • Creating a Speakers Bureau to get cartoonists into schools and libraries
  • Aggregating graphic novel reviews from various accredited sources and generating recommended reading lists for every age group and subject matter

OUR MISSION

Reading With Pictures is a nonprofit organization that advocates the use of comics in the classroom to promote literacy and improve educational outcomes for all students. We work with academics to cultivate groundbreaking research into the proper role of comics in education. We collaborate with cartoonists to produce exceptional graphic novel content for scholastic use. Most importantly, we partner with educators to develop a system of best practices for integrating comics into their curriculum. At Reading With Pictures, we get comics into schools and get schools into comics.

Website www.readingwithpictures.org

Email info@readingwithpictures.org

Facebook www.facebook.com/ReadingWithPictures

Twitter www.twitter.com/ReadingWithPix

Adamson Cheyenne Brings Her Love of Comics to Cosplay

It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. However, if you like, these are truly the time to read this Halloween Special Edition interview from Raven Steel. Hello everyone. Please, Children of the Night, come and gather around as I spin a yarn of my next Cosplay guest. She’s young and very beautiful with just a hint of innocence, but when she in cosplay mode, she’s all business and she can stop traffic no matter what country you live in. From all the way from Western civilization, please give a Zombie Infested welcome to Adamson Cheyenne.


Raven: Welcome to my Dungeon, my Sweet. This interview has been a long time coming. I absolutely knew we would be here together during Halloween week and finally have this interview once and for all. I am so appreciative and yet fearful for my life. 

Chey: Hello Raven Steel and hello to your readers. Thank you so much for having me here to do this Spooky interview with you. Trick O Treat everyone! And as for you, Raven Steel, Death is just the beginning!

Raven: Oh, my! As you might not know before I begin to ask you my list of Ghoulish questions, I offer some words of advice, a ballad of encouragement when you find yourself at crossroads during your career, and in today’s world we all need some inspirational words to make it through all this. So here goes, “If you are the smartest person in the room, then you are in the Wrong Room!

Please tell our readers all about yourself.

Chey: Hello, my name is Adamson Chey. I’m half British and Filipino, a cosplayer from the Philippines. I have been a Cosplayer for 8 years, been a certified SFX makeup artist for short film productions, a freelance model, an actress, a 2D Animator, and an artsy cook.

Raven: What does Cheyenne Adamson love to do when she visits her favorite city? 

Chey: I love to visit different kinds of places, I love adventures and experience the different kinds of cosplay events, and most of all to meet and greet other cosplayers.

Raven: Do you have a favorite Comic, Anime, Manga, graphic novel book you like to read or watch?  

Chey: I’m a big fan of DC, Marvel, Anime, and other cartoons. I could not decide I just love them all.

Raven: What Horror movie still, keeps you up after watching it? 

Chey: Actually, I love to watch all the horror movies. I’m the type of girl who loves to watch different kinds of horror movies. 

Raven: If your life could be any Anime/Manga, Disney, or Animation character you love, who would it be?

Chey: First of all, I love Gotham Sirens. But of course, I love to be Catwoman.

Raven: How did you start out becoming a cosplayer?

Chey: My friend introduced to me the world of cosplay. I never knew cosplay before till my friend showed me a website of different kinds of international cosplayers.

I fell in love with the makeup and the props, It was awesome to be like them. So I’m in my 8th year!

Raven: What would Cheyenne’s choice of weapon would she select to fight off a classroom full of Flesh-Eating Teacher Zombies?  

Chey: Vulcan Mini Gun, Machine Gun, Samurai Swords, and Chainsaw.

Raven: What was your first cosplay outfit? 

Chey: My first cosplay as Harley Quinn. I really love her craziness on the side hahaha!

Raven: How was your experience being a cosplayer? 

Chey: It’s was really great, I’m enjoying myself to meet and greet different kinds of cosplayers and defend those who are bullied because of their looks. 🦸‍♀️

Raven: You are also a model, is that correct. What sort of modeling have you done?

Chey: I did runway fashion shows, Pin-up photoshoots,  makeup, and of course cosplay.  📸

Raven: What’s your favorite thing about Halloween? 

Chey: Joining some Halloween competitions and doing some part-time jobs to scare the living hell from other people hahaha!!!

Raven: What sort of characters attracts you the most? Is it Dark, Bloody, or Gothic like? Do you Love Cute and/or Sexy characters too? 

Chey: Depends on my mood which characters I like to portray.

Raven: What sort of advice or words of wisdom you can offer new cosplayers out there? 

Chey: Never let the haters put you down. It’s your life no one else. It’s a free country, everyone can cosplay.

Raven: If you could be a monstrous character for one night, what would it be?

Chey: Honestly, I to be a vampire or a succubus.

Raven: This is the most important question of the entire interview, Can I get a hug? 

Chey: Sure!

Raven: As the Children of the Night return to their eternal rest, so shall this interview. That’s it, everyone. Thank you, Adamson Cheyenne, for your Howling interview. If I could ask one more question, where can my readers find more of Adamson Cheyenne? 

Chey: Thank you Raven Steel for being so patient with me and making this Halloween a memorable one. Please got to Cheyenne’s Play Arts where anyone can be a fan and get more of me and my artistry.

Please Like. Please Share. And above all, Please Love.

This has been a Raven Steel Exclusive.

ComiXology Delivers Over 115 New Digital Comics For You Today

Shaman King

Today is one of two new comic release days and comiXology has you covered with your digital needs. There’s over 115 new digital comics available for you today all a few clicks away. Check out the full list of releases here or the individual issues by publisher below.

Coamix

comiXology Originals

DC Comics

Fantagraphics

Harlequin

HarperCollins

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Humanoids

Kodansha

Scholastic-Graphix

Seven Seas

SOZO Comics

VIZ Media

Yen Press

ComiXology Delivers Over 125 New Digital Comics with Many Free! DC, Manga, and More!

Dark Nights: Death Metal #1

It’s Tuesday which has become one of two new comic book days of the week! There are lots of new digital comics for you today on comiXology from DC Comics, Kodansha, Seven Seas, Yen Press, and more. There are also lots of free comics to check out! Catch the full list of comics and get them now or look at the full list below.

Akita Publishing

Andrews McMeel Publishing

Coamix

comiXology Original

Dark Horse

DC Comics

Strange Adventures #2

Fantagraphics

IDW Publishing

Tiananmen 1989: Our Shattered Hopes

Kodansha

Marvel

Medibang

Seven Seas

VIZ Media

Yen Press


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

RH Graphic Reveals New Kids and Teens Comics!

At C2E2, RH Graphic shared an inside look at four exciting new graphic novels coming soon for kids and teens on C2E2’s panel “Awesome New Kids and Teens Comics from Random House Graphic.” The panel debuted Witchlight from Jessi Zabarsky, Stepping Stones from Lucy Knisley, Once Upon a Space-Time! from Jeffrey Brown, and Doodleville from Chad Sell.

Comics for kids and teens continue to be the fastest growing area of publishing–providing stories that are both entertaining and engaging, while also placing an emphasis on visual literacy. This amazing creative medium will only continue to build in popularity as RH Graphic continues to roll out with new titles every month. 

Jessi Zabarsky- WITCHLIGHT (available April 14)

Love — loss — witches — this YA fantasy graphic novel has it all! This thoughtful, emotional story will entrance you with its moving story and organic artwork.

Lelek is a witch. That’s all Sanja knows when she meets Lelek in the marketplace. But Lelek is hiding something — and as her life begins to intersect with Sanja’s, all that she’s kept to herself starts to come to light.

Secrets, friendship, and magic all come together as Lelek gets closer and closer to uncovering the truth about her past. . . .Witchlight is a wonderful adventure filled with friendship, family, falling in love, and dealing with the hardest bits of your past all along the way.

Jessi Zabarsky- WITCHLIGHT (available April 14)

Lucy Knisley- STEPPING STONES (available May 5)

Jen is used to not getting what she wants. So suddenly moving the country and getting new stepsisters shouldn’t be too much of a surprise.

As if learning new chores on Peapod Farm wasn’t hard enough, having to deal with perfect-at-everything Andy might be the last straw for Jen. Besides cleaning the chicken coop, trying to keep up with the customers at the local farmers’ market, and missing her old life, Jen has to deal with her own insecurities about this new family . . . and where she fits in.

New York Times bestselling author Lucy Knisley brings to life a story inspired from her own childhood in an amazing journey navigating her parents’ divorce and of unlikely friends, sisters, and home.

Lucy Knisley- STEPPING STONES (available May 5)

Jeffrey Brown- ONCE UPON A SPACE-TIME! (available June 2)

Jide and Petra are just two normal kids until they are selected to leave Earth and join their new alien classmates on an intergalactic research mission to Mars. Too bad Petra has no idea how she ended up in the program, seeing as the closest she wants to get to space is being a sci-fi writer. Jide, on the other hand, is the brains of the mission, but his helicopter parents make it clear he hasn’t left their gravitational pull behind quite yet.

What is meant to be an intra-species bonding experience soon turns to hijinx as the kids discover The Potato orbiting around their new space classroom and accidentally launch a mission of their own without any adult commanders around to supervise–or help!

From New York Times bestselling author Jeffery Brown comes an out-of-this-world adventure perfect for the astronaut-in-training in your life.

Jeffrey Brown- ONCE UPON A SPACE-TIME! (available June 2)

Chad Sell- CARDBOARD KINGDOM/ DOODLEVILLE (available June 9)

An inventive new story from Cardboard Kingdom creator Chad Sell about a group of young artists who must work together when one of their own creations becomes a monster.

Drew is just a regular artist. But there’s nothing ordinary about her art. Her doodles are mischievous . . . and rarely do they stay in Doodleville, the world she’s created in her sketchbook. Instead, Drew’s doodles prefer to explore the world outside. But after an inspiring class trip to the Art Institute of Chicago–where the doodles cause a bit too much trouble–Drew decides it’s time to take her artistic talents to the next level.

Enter the Leviathan–Levi, for short. He’s bigger and better than anything Drew has ever created before. He’s a monster, but a friendly one. That is, until Levi begins to wreak havoc on Drew’s other doodles–and on the heroes her classmates have dreamt up.

Levi won’t be easily tamed, and it seems there is a link between the monster’s bad behavior and Drew’s feelings. With the help of her loyal art club friends, will she be able to save Doodleville–and Levi–before it’s too late?

Chad Sell- CARDBOARD KINGDOM/ DOODLEVILLE (available June 9)

Archie Comics Joins CBLDF as a Corporate Member

Archie Comics has joined the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund as the organization’s newest Corporate Member! Archie Comics is the leading mass market comic book publisher in the world, with franchises that have introduced comic books, art and reading to billions of people all over the world. Their iconic characters, including Archie, Jughead, Betty and Veronica, Reggie, Kevin Keller, Josie and the Pussycats, Sabrina the Teenage Witch are spotlighted weekly on The CW’s ‘Riverdale’ and upcoming ‘Katy Keene’ TV series and the Netflix series ‘Chilling Adventures of Sabrina’, and have been featured in animation, television, film and music.

CBLDF provides legal and educational resources to protect the freedom to read comics. The organization is a partner in Banned Books Week, the Kids’ Right to Read Project, Free Comic Book Day, and other national institutions that support intellectual freedom and literacy. CBLDF’s work extends from courtrooms to classrooms to conventions, where CBLDF defends the freedom to read by providing legal aid, letters of support in book challenges, challenges to unconstitutional legislation, and a robust schedule of programs about current and historical censorship to audiences all over the world. Most recently the organization co-published the civics awareness comic book This Is What Democracy Looks Like in partnership with the Center for Cartoon Studies, and is providing support for numerous identity censorship cases across the United States. You can learn more about their work, and sign up for their upcoming free webinars at

Archie stands beside Abrams, Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab, Boom! Studios, comiXology, Dark Horse Comics, DC Comics, Discount Comic Book Service, Diamond Comic Distributors, FAKKU, Humble Bundle, IDW Publishing, Image Comics, Lion Forge, NeverWear, Oni Press, Penguin Random House, Rebellion, ReedPOP, Scholastic, Valiant, Viz Media, and the Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation as a corporate member supporting CBLDF’s important work.

Art by Veronica Fish
Almost American
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