Review: Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot only has “One Last Shot” as the brand-new story arc starts in Bloodshot #10! Artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo join writer Tim Seeley for Bloodshot’s road to retribution. Who can a one-man army trust when everyone’s trying to kill him?

The last issue of Bloodshot wasn’t exactly the strongest in the series. Whereas the series has found its strength in the urgency that comes from Tim Seeley’s writing and the speed in which things happen from moment to moment, the last issue suffered from a general lack of cohesiveness as the story (and the character) jumped from location to location in an interesting use of Bloodshot’s abilities that did come across as well as it could have. Otherwise, though, the series has been a breath of excitement borne from the action movie pace of the comic; when it’s good, it’s very good.

Bloodshot #10 introduces comics fans to characters that we’ve seen in the 2020 movie with Wilfred Wigins making his on page debut, and I can’t help but read his lines Lamorne Morris’ voice – something that Seeley captures really well. Wigans’ adds a level of levity to the comic that has been missing (it’s odd, because levity and humour don’t often go hand in hand with Bloodshot, but with Seeley’s style of story telling, the combination actually works a lot better than I’d have expected after previous Bloodshot runs). It’s not all fun and games, though, as we find Bloodshot locked in a place he’ll need to escape from in order to face a new and familiar threat – without going into specifics, the escape sequence is somewhat disturbing in what it doesn’t show you. There’s also a lot of story here; I had to check a couple of times when reading the comic what page I was on, because I was convinced the comic was an oversized book

Seeley is joined by artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andrea, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. Although Booth’s name comes ahead of Andreo’s in the credits, he’s only actually credited with a handful of pages in the comic. The reason I mention this is because Andreo’s work is really good. The Spaniard adds a visual flair to the book that’s a lot like adding parmesan cheese onto a pasta dish; it just makes an already good meal a touch better. His style also flows from the previous issue, which gives the entire series a sense of visual continuity despite having a plethora of talented artists in its ten-issue run. Andreo bolsters a solid story with his layouts and copious use of blank space amongst the action. The sequential art in this book has some spectacular moments amidst a story that slides between good and pretty good with ease.

Bloodshot #10 is a return to the series previous energy and flow, kicking off another arc that should allow new readers to hop into the series with relative ease. What isn’t captured in the recap you can figure out from exposition in the dialogue. A return to form after last issue, which is always good news for any jumping on point.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.