Tag Archives: supergirl

The Flash Runs to National City to Meet Supergirl

Rumors have persisted for quite some time, but CBS and The CW announced today that Barry Allen/The Flash will be heading to National City where he’ll meet Kara Danvers/Supergirl. Grant Gustin, who plays Barry Allen/The Flash will be fighting along Melissa Benoist‘s Supergirl on Monday, March 28 at 8/7c on CBS’ Supergirl.

In the release announcing the event episode Executive Producers Greg Berlanti and Andrew Kreisberg not only thanked CBS, The CW, and DC Comics, and Gustin for working this out, but also the fans (and even journalists) who were vocal in wanting to see this happen.

This isn’t the first channel crossover we’ve seen. Constantine‘s John Constantine, which aired on NBC before being cancelled, appeared on an episode of Arrow (a show which The Flash shares a “universe”) during the latest season. This crossover would mean all four shows share a universe/multiverse.

The Flash and Supergirl

TV Review: Supergirl S1E12 Bizarro

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1A twisted version of Supergirl, one who’s the mirror image of the Kryptonian hero, sets out to destroy her national city counterpart. Meanwhile, Kara grows closer to Cat’s son Adam.

CBSSupergirl has some good and some bad in this episode which revolves around a different version of the classic character Bizarro than we’re used to.

And the episode really fails with the concept of Bizarro who isn’t the opposite of Supergirl at all. She just talks in a stilted speech pattern. That’s part of the charm of the actual character. Instead of saying he hates someone, he says he loves them. And that can create some pretty funny moments. Here, we get none of that, just really bad makeup and horrible writing that misses the point.

If you’re not going to go all the way, why would you even give a nod to the character? It raises the bar for fans of Superman and Supergirl, and I’d imagine many will be disappointed for similar reasons that I am.

The rest of the episode is dealing with Kara and her personal relationship, and all of that is very predictable plotwise.

The acting, some of the action, it’s all pretty decent otherwise and rather entertaining. There’s just some big opportunities here that were ignored and thrown to the side. This is an example of why giving nods to the source material can backfire.

I will say that the turn with Maxwell Lord is welcome and nips the worry I had that he’d be dragged along as a younger hipper version of Lex Luthor. That’s not the case, which is a good thing.

I had high hopes for the episode. I expected Bizarro, we just got Supergirl in bad makeup.

Overall rating: 6.1

TV Review: Supergirl S1E11 Strange Visitor from Another Planet

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1Hank is confronted by his painful past when a member of the alien race that wiped out his people kidnaps Senator Miranda Crane. Meanwhile, Cat’s estranged son arrives in National City.

CBSSupergirl has an interesting spin this episode. The majority of the episode doesn’t focus on Supergirl, but instead it splits its story between Cat and her estranged son and Hank Henshaw/J’onn J’onzz.

Both stories really are one in the same in that they are focused on family and dealing with your past decisions or events.

In Cat’s case it’s letting her son go to pursue her career. Through some meddling they’re reunited and it’s rather awkward at times. It’s an attempt to probably make Cat a bit more human, and there’s some tender moments, but something doesn’t quite sit right about it all.

The majority of the episode involves a new threat, a White Alien which we learn is from Mars and at war with J’onn J’onzz Green aliens. We learn his people were enslaved and murdered by the alien. This has him seeking both revenge against the White Alien and at times wanting for things to end so he can return to his family in the afterlife.

This is a bit better as far as the plot, but again, something is off. The story is a but predictable in how it ends and the lines and acting is a bit cheesy.

While the idea of the episode is cool, and it’s great to see other characters fleshed out, the acting, tone, and even some of the special fx, just aren’t quite up to snuff compared to previous episodes. Not all will be winners, and this one is a bit of a clunker.

Overall rating: 6.7

Fashion Spotlight: Quailman No More, Batmin V Superhob, Super BFFS

Ript Apparel has three new designs! Quailman No More, Batmin V Superhob, and Super BFFS, by adho1982, ZRiSes, and Doomcat, are on sale today only! Get them before they’re gone!

Quailman No More

31096-detail-569d0869c157b_1024x1024

Batmin V Superhob

31097-detail-569d0bf732297_1024x1024

Super BFFS

31098-detail-569d0dab55375_1024x1024

 

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

TV Review: Supergirl S1E10 Childish Things

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1Kara does her best to support Winn when he hears that his father Winslow Schott Sr. breaks out of prison. His father looks for Winn for a reason to become like him. Cat offers Lucy a job working at CatCo and Alex asks Hank to use his powers to find out and uncover Maxwell Lord’s plans.

CBSSupergirl takes a bit of a darker turn this episode. The coloring and vibe reminded me much more of The Flash series from the 90s which had a darker palate and vibe.

The episode does a solid job expanding on a lot of the characters that haven’t gotten a ton as the show pivots a bit more to focus on Maxwell Lord’s plan (which you know will be evil).

The may thrust of the story is Winn’s father who turns out to be Toyman. There’s some nice nods to the character in comics and we learn a lot more about Winn. There’s also some solid moments where we reflect on Kara’s family situation. Of course Winn’s crush on Kara is addressed and the series goes where I was hoping it did.

Then there’s J’onn who we learn a bit more about his powers and what he is and isn’t willing to do with them. That’s clearly building and gives us more of the great power comes great responsibility aspect of having super powers.

The final thing is Lucy Lane being offered a job. There’s some solid exploration of women and jobs, with some really fascinating back and forth between her and James. I want more of this in many ways. It’s great in that in gives a lot more depth to the characters and also explores real world issues.

The episode brings the series back with what’s hopefully a long uninterrupted run. There was an episode two weeks ago after a break, then another break, now this. It’s a good episode to set up what’s to come in the second half of the season.

Overall rating: 8.1

Supergirl – Childish Things Gets Two Sneak Peeks

Kara does her best to support Winn when his father, the supervillain Toyman, breaks out of prison and seeks out his son for unknown reasons. Also, Cat offers Lucy a job at CatCo and Alex asks Hank to use his powers to help uncover Maxwell Lord’s plans, on Supergirl, Monday, Jan. 18 at 8/7c on CBS. Henry Czerny guest stars as Winslow Schott, Sr., aka Toyman.

TV Review: Supergirl S1E9 Blood Bonds

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1A standoff ensues between the DEO and Astra’s forces also Non kidnaps Hank, while Kara tries to refute Cat’s allegations that she’s Supergirl.

CBSSupergirl returns from its holiday break with a brand new episode that has the DEO and Kara figuring out what to do when Hank is kidnapped.

The episode is a mix bag with Kara talking to her aunt a lot in a boring, predictable way. It has the warm and fuzzy boringness and feels really anticlimactic. The whole situation could have built into something much more, but it just seems to fizzle leading in a direction that’s somewhat predictable.

What is actually good is Kara dealing with Cat thinking she’s Supergirl. We get some solid insight as to what someone like her would keep a job like that. It’s always a good question considering how powerful she is, not like she really needs work, or can’t work for the DEO. The end of that situation is handled really well with a nice twist that makes sense.

What’s really solid is the build of Maxwell Lord which the series has been slowly progressing into a worthy bad guy. It hasn’t been obvious, and what he’s up to isn’t obvious at all. But, this episode gives us more in that storyline than any episode before.

This wasn’t the best episode of the series, but a welcome return to the small screen that has me excited for the latter half of the first season.

Overall rating: 7.8

Immigration And Comics

ck-rocket-from-krypton-croppedYou’d have to have been living under a rock to have avoided the refugee and, to a lesser extent, the immigration discussions occurring these past few months.

As an immigrant myself, it’s a discussion that I’ve been paying some attention too.

First things first, though, is that I should clarify that my situation in no way resembled the plight of those from Syria. As a white man immigrating from the United Kingdom it would be offensive to those refugees to say that I know what they’re going through. I don’t.

I genuinely hope that I never will.

Indeed, I have been present in my new country when people start talking about “the immigrants” taking their jobs because they didn’t consider me an immigrant.  This was shortly after asking about my accent. I may be a white guy, but my accent sure isn’t from this side of the pond. That’s about as much prejudice as I have ever encountered on my end, directly, and while I found it exasperatingly funny at the time, it does go to  show the general sense that a (very) few have toward immigrants (at least in my experience, but as I said, mine is not the same as the Syrian refugees. Not even close). Even comparing a refugee to an immigrant is a slippery slope; while some immigrants such as myself arrive in a new country of their own volition, some undoubtedly feel forced out of their homes, due to escalating conflicts or tensions at home. But either way, the immigrant has a little more freedom to make the decision. A refugee has no choice in the matter; they just want their family to feel safe.

And the type of safety that the Syrian refugees are currently seeking, and the scale of the horror’s they are running from is something that many of us have no personal experience with.  Hopefully we never will, but that doesn’t preclude us from having some empathy for them, either.

My family have lived in England for as long as I am aware (my Aunt traced my grandfather’s line back to around the 1700’s, give or take), so I can’t knowingly claim that there is any immigration within my family’s past (myself aside), but that’s not necessarily true of people living on this side of the pond.

There are millions of people in North American who can trace their families back across the years and the oceans to other countries, when their ancestors left their home lands for fear of persecution or simply to hope for a better life.

This is especially true when it comes to some of the early and/or influential members of the comic book community.

The Thing KirbyIndeed, many of the greatest names in American comics are often the first generation born in the new country, such as Art Speigelman (the author of Maus), Bill Finger (co-creator of Batman, Green Lantern, and many many others), Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (the men who created Superman). Even Bob Kane‘s (Batman‘s other co-creator) parents were of Eastern European Jewish descent. The point I am attempting to make here is that the sons of Jewish immigrants created some of our biggest super heroes, and some of our greatest stories.

And what of their creations? 

Superman is an alien from another planet who’s family sought refuge for their only child from the end of their world. He is far from native to any country on Earth, yet he has chosen to make the planet his  home. Far beyond just simply moving from country to country, Superman is an interplanetary immigrant that kick started the modern superhero comic. 

And he’s not the only immigrant in comics, either; Supergirl, the Martian Manhunter are but two of the early inter-planetary examples, X-O Manowar is both a geographical and chronological immigrant (it sounds confusing when typing it like that, but the character is as rich and deep as any other on this list). Howard the Duck has been trapped in a world that he’s slowly become accustomed to, but was never his own; and Thor Odinson has been protecting our world for centuries – and even without his hammer he continues to do so. The idea of a hero from the stars come to save humanity (or in the case of Howard the Duck to simply work amongst us) is an idea that as comic book fans we’re all enamored with , and in many cases these interplanetary immigrants have become some of the most beloved, and powerful, characters in the comic book reading world.

Giant-Size_X-Men_Vol_1_1In terms of the more traditional Earthbound type of immigration, the of moving between countries, look at almost the entire second team of X-Men; BansheeColossus, Nightcrawler, Sunfire, Storm and Wolverine are all from countries other than the US. You know what that makes them, eh?

If  these characters were ignored because they were immigrants, both of the interplanetary and Earthbound nature,  would comics, nay, popular culture, even have the same face? The Superman symbol is an internationally recognized symbol of truth, justice, and the American Way, and Wolverine is arguably one of the most popular characters to ever appear in a comic book. What if the parents of the previously mentioned creators, and the numerous others I haven’t named who are also descended from immigrants, were trying to escape their living conditions to provide a better life for their families today? Would we still want to turn them away?

If it wasn’t for the sons and daughters of refugees and immigrants the comic book landscape, and perhaps even our way of life would be drastically different than what we’re used too. Before you add your voice to those who say we should close up our borders, take a long hard look at your family history, at the characters you love, and tell me where you would be if the country you call home had refused to admit any new immigrants at any point in the past two or three hundred years.

Would you still be sat here reading this, if your ancestors hadn’t had the opportunity to live a new life in North America?

TV Review: Supergirl S1E8 Hostile Takeover

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1Kara faces off with Astra after her aunt challenges Kara’s beliefs about her mother; and Cat is threatened with being removed as CEO of CatCo after a hacker exposes her private and damaging emails.

CBSSupergirl goes a different route this episode. While there’s movement in the Supergirl/Astra storyline but really the focus is Cat and her being threatened with being fired.

Not only does the episode reveal that Cat has another son, but as she says herself she’s dealing with the “walking personification of white male privilege.”

The episode takes on its girl power theme through this storyline focusing on Cat this go around. It addresses the issues of a woman being the CEO of a corporation. It’s something we don’t see often in a drama, let alone an action series like this one.

The story also feels right at home and natural for the series.

It’s also clear there’s a bigger plot concerning Astra, and we get a taste of some of what that is. Also on tap is Henshaw/J’onn mentioning his powers in a nice wink and smile for comic fans.

Overall, the episode is solid in that while there was action and adventure, it also is very personal in many ways in its focus on Cat addressing a real world issue.

But, with all of that, we also finally get someone being smart when it comes to secret identities instead of everyone being an idiot about it all.

The end fight scene had some good and some bad, but overall much more good than bad.

Treating characters intelligently. Addressing real world issues. Lots of action. This is a solid episode, especially after last week’s excellent reveal.

Overall rating: 8.1

TV Review: Supergirl S1E7 Human for a Day

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 1Kara and her friends are forced to rely on their inner strength and courage when an earthquake strikes National City, while Alex’s mistrust of Hank reaches its breaking point when the earthquake traps them in the DEO with an alien escapee called Jemm.

CBSSupergirl adds another familiar face in a big payoff episode that runs a story that’s been done over and over, but, it’s done really well here.

Supergirl has lost her powers after last episode which saw her go against the Red Tornado. Unfortunately an earthquake has hit the city and everyone is looking towards Supergirl to save them which she can’t. That has the stereotypical story of people realizing the superhero within them. We’ve seen this story before and here it’s done decently. It’s very cute and there’s some moments that definitely gave me feels.

But really the bigger story is the D.E.O. and and reveal of who Hank Henshaw really is. We’ve been teased that he’s not human and we finally get the reveal.

Stop reading if you don’t want to know.

You good?

Ok, here we go!

Henshaw is in fact the Martian Manhunter! J’onn J’onzz is now on television and the outfit and look is reminiscent of the New 52 version, but it actually looked really good!

This feels like a great payoff and reveal, one that was well worth the teasing and the time it took to reveal it was solid, not too long, not too short.

It may be that reveal that saved the episode from being cheese, but overall, it pumped me up excited to see what comes next.

Overall rating: 9

« Older Entries