Tag Archives: marvel

People’s History of the Marvel Universe #3: Making Cap Marvel

Face front, true believers!

Welcome back to People’s History of the Marvel Universe, where I explore how real-world politics (and weird bits of pop culture) was presented in some of my favorite bits of classic Marvel comics. In this issue, I’ll be discussing how Captain America made the transition from his Timely Comics incarnation to the Marvel era.

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Timely Comics’s version of Captain America was (to be kind) rather crude, still in that stage where superheroes as a genre are still emerging from pulp, so there’s a lot of repetitious scenes where Cap and/or Bucky get tied to chairs because that’s the only way the author can think of to get to the plot exposition, most of the villains are pretty generic mobster types, and so on. However, Jack Kirby and Stan Lee were able to go back and sift through the old material to find the stuff that worked – Steve Rogers as Captain America, the uniform and the mighty shield, the Red Skull, Agent 13 – while ditching the stuff that didn’t work (the secret identity, Bucky to an extent, etc.).

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At the same time, there were a number of strategies that Marvel used to make the transition work. First, in the very act of updating Captain America from the 1940s to the 1960s, Kirby and Lee made Steve Rogers a man out of time, giving a previously rather thinly-sketched individual a rich source of Marvel-style pathos and interiority. The Steve Rogers who emerged in the pages of The Avengers, Tales of Suspense, and Captain America is a veteran haunted by the memory of his losses during WWII, a rare example in which PTSD is given its place in that conflict. (Indeed, a lot of stories from this era involve Cap having vivid flashbacks or hallucinations that make him question his sanity.)

However, with Kirby there as the keeper of the sacred flame to ensure that the original spirit of Captain America wasn’t lost, Steve Rogers’ status as a man out of time was never an excuse to position him as a conservative or reactionary figure. Rather, Captain America’s position was that he would embrace these changes and fight for the same progressive change that he had back in the New Deal:

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And that’s what I think people often get wrong about Captain America: while he was born into the “Greatest Generation,” he’s not an old man. Rather, because of his variable number of decades frozen in the ice, he’s a young man who’s traveled through time, bringing the passion and idealism of youth into a new era.

Second, Kirby and Lee kept much of the political edge of the original comics by making a foundational element of the new Cap comics that Nazism was not dead, but had continued into the present day as a hostile force that threatened liberal values, often hidden beneath reactionary causes and movements (hence the usefulness of HYDRA as a dark mirror through which to question and explore the national security state in Captain America: Winter Soldier). For example, early on in Tales of Suspense, they posited that Nazi agents were at work in modern Germany:

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To argue that Nazis were hidden in German society, as if Himmler’s Operation Werwolf had really come to pass, was a pretty bold political statement in a Cold War world only five years past the construction of the Berlin Wall and in which the Western German government had yet to publicly grapple with the legacy of the Holocaust. But Kirby’s political acumen shines in these issues, grounding these stories in contemporary politics, as with this reference to West German laws banning the display of Nazi iconography:

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Third, another thing that Marvel could bring to the table is a fully matured Jim Kirby. As I mentioned above, the Timely Captain America comics were too close to the pulp era to really be distinctively superheroic. But by the 1960s, Kirby was Kirby. And so what the Red Skull’s sleeper agents were out to awaken was not merely a coup against the Federal Republic of Germany, but a giant Nazi robot:

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The Timely Comics version of the Red Skull had been a petty saboteur and sometimes assassin, very much within the wheelhouse of pulp antagonists. The new Red Skull (who’ll be explored in future installments) was reimagined as a full-on supervillain with a flair for giant robots, doomsday devices, world conquest, and grandiloquent speeches complete with cigarette holder. And so Kirby gave the world not just a giant robot menacing the free world, but a Nazi Voltron:

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This was the secret alchemy that brought Captain America into the contemporary world of Mighty Marvel Comics: on the one hand, Jack Kirby’s larger-than-life visuals and Marvel’s attention to interiority gave Captain America new life, but on the other, the original political spirit of the Timely Comics was carefully preserved, so that what made Captain America unique is a superhero is that his power is essentially weaponized progressive ideology:

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TV Review: Agent Carter S2E5 The Atomic Job

Agent_CarterAs Jarvis’ precision and quick-thinking skills are put to the ultimate test, Peggy must find a way to stop an atomic explosion that threatens to destroy all of California.

Marvel’s Agent Carter goes Superman III with a threat to destroy California (why do comic related live action things hate California so much?).

Tonight’s episode is a bit mix for me as there’s some solid humor, but also a lot of gadgets that feel a bit out of place at times, like a second rate Q from James Bond.

The good for me was the humor, especially early in the episode with Carter in disguise searching an office. There was some solid stuff in there that had me entertained. Then there’s an ongoing joke about pie which is also solid. Then there’s Jarvis and the uranium that ends with some nice humor.

There’s lots of use of goofy gadgets in this one, some of which you wonder why they aren’t used in the modern tv series or movies. But, it all comes to that bomb plot that bothers me. It seems so out of place and really random as to why it’s needed. It feels rather hokey overall and a bit grand for Whitney Frost. Plus the handling of getting the uranium out of there, and the fact that uranium doesn’t equal a nuclear bomb. It’s rather off.

The episode is decent, but not quite as good as last week. Still it’s one of the better ones this season, which is picking up speed as it moves along.

Overall Score: 7.2

Review: Howard The Duck #4

howard-the-duck-4She’s obsessed, she’s powerful, she’s ALMOST the new herald of Galactus! And like the rest of the universe, SCOUT is after Howard. But with an eye to ending the hunger of the Devourer of Worlds!

After four issues, we finally get an answer as to what in the blue hell happened to cause the very first scene in this series. The scene, in case you haven’t been reading the comic, was of Howard the Duck surfing through the cosmos chased by innumerable ships (okay, I could probably count them, but the issue is in a long box right now and I’m lazy… so innumerable it is. It also sounds more dramatic, right?) on a certain silver surfboard.

I’m not lying.

Howard The Duck has become easily one of my most anticipated comics currently being released each month, and a large part of that is because of Chip Zdarsky. He’s funny without making this a comedy book – while I’m laughing away each issue, the story would be good without the laughs, there’s an underlying emotional core here that’s exploring the depths you’d go to for a friend that makes each issue a pleasure to read. That it’s funny on top of that is the icing on a very beautiful cake.

I’ve been told that this series couldn’t measure up to Steve Gerber‘s run, and while that may be true, I have no basis for comparison. I’ve never read that run but I have no reason to disbelieve that at all, and so while this volume of Howar the Duck is ongoing I have no intention to pick up the Gerber run on the off chance it ruins my love of Zdarsky‘s Howard.

One day, maybe.

But going back to this issue, another huge plus for me this issue is the fact that there’s no back up strip any more. While I enjoyed the Gwenpool strip – it was a decent story – I’m not unhappy that there isn’t a second new Gwenpool story starting up as I get the feeling that she’s a character to be enjoyed in small doses. I’m also quite happy that the comic has dropped a dollar in price (and with the Canadian dollar where it is right now, that’s not a bad thing).

When all is said and done, there were some great comics released last week, but for my money Howard the Duck #4 was among the best of the bunch.

Story: Chip Zdarsky Art: Joe Quinones & Joe Rivera
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.25 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Mike Marts talks AfterShock Comics

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Mike Marts, AfterShock Editor-in-Chief

Mike Marts began his career working at Marvel Comics in 1993. Having begun as Assistant Editor, he is now the Editor-in-Chief and a founding member of AfterShock Comics. Having spent twenty years working for both Marvel and DC Comics, he is now shaping the face of independent publishing. Taking a few minutes from his busy life, Marts discussed what makes AfterShock’s emphasis on quality story-telling, the dangers being “All-New” too often and the joy of sharing interests with his daughter.

Graphic Policy: How was your weekend?

Mike Marts: Fantastic. I’m a Bronco’s fan. It couldn’t have been any better.

GP: Did you catch the Captain America: Civil War trailer?

MM: Yes. Yeah, it was great.

GP: Whose side are you on?

MM: (Chuckles.) The side that makes Marvel a lot of money.

GP: Fair enough. It’s a pretty exciting year for Marvel/DC movies. Considering your work with both publishers, do you have a preference?

MM: No, honestly, I’m happy when I see everyone do well. Right now it seems like most studios are firing on all cylinders. They’re really putting some quality product out there so… I’m excited for everything. Deadpool, X-Men: Apocalypse, Civil War, Batman V. Superman, Suicide Squad. Everything’s looking fantastic.

GP: It’s very exciting. Do you find yourself gravitating towards Marvel Studios over Fox or Sony?

MM: Yeah, I think so. It’s probably because most of the characters that are involved in the Fox movie films are characters I worked on and associate with more but… I worked there for such a long time. You know, you see the blood, sweat and tears and hard work that everyone at Marvel Comics puts into the movies. So, definitely over the last ten years I’ve felt much more attachment to the movies Marvel Studios put out.

GP: Who was your favorite writer growing up?

MM: Easily Chris Claremont. Chris wrote the X-Men comics and those are the ones I fell in love with. Those are the ones I started collecting. For me, as a ten-year-old boy, the X-Men were everything. When I first got interested in working in comics and writing for comics, Chris was the person I wanted to be. I was so enamored with his work. It was great being able to work with him multiple times at Marvel.

GP: Does that mean Jim Lee was your favorite artist?

MM: Jim Lee was one of my favorites. Certainly that era was great artistically. I first got into X-Men maybe ten years before that, so John Byrne and Paul Smith were really the main X-Men artists to me. That’s really who I identified with.

GP: What was your favorite story while you were working at Marvel?

MM: That would be a close tie, maybe a three-way tie. If I had to pick one it would probably be Joss Whedon and John Cassady’s Astonishing X-Men run. Over the course of a career, there are so many different arcs that you look on fondly. But it’s hard to look back at that and not see perfection from every angle. Both those guys are just the epitome of perfection in storytelling. I don’t know that I’ve had that happen before or since. They were just at the top of their game, delivering incredible stories. Probably a close second and third for me would be Wolverine: Origins with Andy Kubert and Paul Jenkins and then Grant Morrison’s run on New X-Men.

GP: What were your favorite independent titles while you were working with Marvel?

MM: I would bounce around. I never really had an allegiance to any specific company. I would usually follow certain creators, certainly Brian K. Vaughan. Walt Simonson’s work outside of DC and Marvel like his work on Ragnarok, was appealing to me.

GP: What do you feel like set those titles apart from what was being published at Marvel and DC?

MM: It’s something I’ve discovered working at AfterShock, when people are working on their creator-owned projects, I think there’s a certain ownership. Really, it’s almost like being a parent of a story that doesn’t always exist in the mainstream. That’s not to say it doesn’t happen. It certainly does with certain creators. But on the creator-owned projects you see the TLC, that parenting and ownership on everything they are doing because of their personal stake. Not that you’re never getting someone’s best work elsewhere, but I think working on a creator-owned project you’re getting something they are truly invested in and dedicated to.

GP: What was the appeal of taking the position at AfterShock as Editor-in-Chief, going from such large companies as Marvel and DC to the antithesis, a much smaller and unestablished company?

MM: When I look at it, my perspective is I’ve been building towards doing something like AfterShock my entire career. Marvel and DC gave me huge opportunities to prove myself and work on great projects with great creators, but personally I’ve always wanted to build something on my own. I’ve always wanted to start my own company and my partners at AfterShock were cool enough to give me that opportunity. For me, moving from the two big publishers to something brand new never seemed that dangerous, it seemed like the next evolutionary phase of my career.

GP: A lot of publishers start out very specialized. IDW focused on horror for a long time. Avatar still focuses on mature content. But from books like Super Zero to Insexts, there is a lot of variety from one book to the next. How would you characterize AfterShock to someone who had not read its work?

MM: AfterShock as a company is the top-name creators telling the best stories possible. The fact that we have such variety is a lucky by-product. Our first goal is the best possible story, a story we’re interested in reading, unique and different. Something that hasn’t been done before. The fact that we have so much that’s different coming out has been our secondary goal, but it’s certainly not the first goal.

GP: Your CEO, Jon Kramer, and President, Lee Kramer, both have backgrounds in film and television. How big a consideration is the ability to crossover into movies when you’re considering a new story?

MM: It’s not the first thing we think about. But, certainly, it’s fantastic if the story has legs for something beyond comic books. The cool thing is with John and Lee’s experience, we’re in a great position to quickly enter into different areas of media if we choose to go down that path. The infrastructure is always set up. Other publishers don’t always have that experience and may add extra steps along the way. In our company, we have a lot of experience not just in film and television but distribution, publishing, in social media. We have a good mix of people.

GP: Would you say there’s a possible burnout of interest in television shows and films that started as comics?

MM: If there is, I don’t think it’s anywhere in the near future. If you look at everything that’s on the networks today and so many things hitting the theaters, there are so many projects that have originated in comic books. And so much of it is really high quality. Everything from Marvel’s Netflix shows to their movies, I, Zombie and Lucifer and Gotham. Even things my daughter watches like Teen Titans Go! is high quality. I don’t think it’s luck that this is happening. People who grew up reading comic books and loving that art form know what it’s like to put together a quality story. Now these people have grown up and are in industries like movies and television and video games. They’re applying that storytelling foundation and background to the stuff they are working on today. I really don’t think there’s an end in sight because there’s so much good quality in the libraries of what’s been done.

GP: How old is your daughter?

MM: Six. She’s home sick today so I’m taking care of her.

GP: That’s a wonderful age. My daughter is eight and we’re just getting into Tolkien.

MM: That’s so cool that you are guys are getting into Tolkien! I can’t wait to get there. I can’t wait for the day she picks up a Harry Potter book. We spend so much time doing Star Wars together. She loves all the Marvel and DC superheroes. It’s a good thing.

GP: It absolutely is. She’s lucky to have you to share that with.

Many writers know the pain of approaching a publisher that is accepting submissions from artists but not from writers. What’s your advice on how they might find some advantage?

MM: You know, everyone has their own different story and there’s no magic formula. You can never give up in this industry. There’s only a few spots and so many people vying for those spots, so many people who are great in their own right. You have to persevere and stand out from the pack, find some special way of making noise and getting yourself seen without becoming pushy, annoying or overbearing. It’s a magic line and not everybody finds it. Some people do and still are not able to break through. That’s how tough it is. But when you do, you are in. You are part of a brotherhood and there’s not really any going back.

GP: Andy Schmidt once told me when I asked a similar question about how to talk to editor’s when the position is “we won’t look at unsolicited material” that you might try approaching the editor directly and saying, “May I please send this to you.” What are your thoughts on that approach?

MM: Every company has their own way of looking at stuff. We don’t look at stuff unsolicited. I recommend people putting stuff up on their site and then telling the right person it’s there. Then people can go look at it. Being in contact and letting people know you’re out there is a good thing. If you’re not telling people to go look at it then you’re already working from a point of disadvantage.

GP: I’ve been reading comic shop owners who are saying the sales for Marvel and DC are down. Do you have any insight as to why?

MM: No, I don’t. Certain companies have a certain title count they’re aiming for each month. Not AfterShock, but certain companies do. They may be required to get a certain amount out each month. Not all the time but what that can sometimes mean is you can dilute your existing talent and maybe diminish the quality of your product. If there is a decline in mainstream sales, my guess might start there.

GP: Do you think that events like Marvel NOW and New 52 that are intended to bring in new readers ultimately drive people away?

MM: No, not necessarily. I was involved in New 52 quite a bit. The best intentions are always involved in launches like that. I do think they can capitalize on what they’re trying to do, draw in new readers while retaining the existing readership. Certainly with DC’s New 52 there was great success and great reviews. It seemed we were bringing in new readers, bringing back lost readers and satisfying our existing readers. Where some of that can fall short, not speaking of anyone specifically, is when you don’t stick to a plan or what you’re promising. Maybe you shift gears too suddenly by saying, “Wait, here’s something ‘All-New’…” you’re sending mixed messages. You’re not fully following through on the promise you made last month or last year. Comic readers are highly intelligent and have seen every relaunch, sales gimmick, marketing trick in the past. When you have something like that where you’re trying to bring the new while you retain the old, you have to continue with that. Sometimes that might mean not being able to take some other chances. But you have to stick with your message and what you promise.

GP: I have read other complaints that, while diversity is important, a lot of the diversity we see today is shoe-horned in and feels a bit pandering. How do you feel about characters like Sam Wilson/Captain America or Jane Foster/Thor?

MM: Having worked at Marvel when both those stories took place I can tell you they originated from story ideas. There was never a conversation where people said, “we have to mix things up and increase diversity. We have to have a female Thor or African American Cap.” Those conversations started with Jason Aaron or Rick Remender or whoever coming to their editor saying, “I got a great idea. Something terrible happens to Steve Rodgers and, guess what? Sam Wilson has to take his place.” That conversation may have gone differently at a different company or at a different time but definitely those two instances were born out of true need for original story. I definitely stand behind them. It’s the same type of thing in ’83 or ‘84 when Tony Stark was battling alcoholism and James Rhodes had to step in and become Iron Man. That was born out of story. That was a huge deal. I think sometimes, after the fact, it’s easy for those story-needs to get caught up in hotter topics and the issue of diversity. But more often than not they’re born out of a need for story and I think that’s an admirable thing.

GP: With Dreaming Eagles, AfterShock has quickly demonstrated its own diversity. But where does that importance reside when the subject may not necessitate a certain race?

MM: Well, it’s a good question. But at AfterShock what we promise in our mission statement is to deliver the best stories. From that priority we get stories like Dreaming Eagles. If we get great stories that tackle social issues that’s a double-win for us. The first win is getting a great story and helping someone like Garth Ennis (Dreaming Eagles) or Paul Jenkins (Replica) or Jimmy Palmiotti (Super Zero) to see their dream story fully-realized and printed. If we tackle tough issues in the meantime, that’s a double win for us.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Jonesy_001_A_MainWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Javier

Top Pick: Sunflower #4 (451 Media) – The visuals are amazing, but the luminescence is in stark contrast to the dark cult ridden story. CJ will do anything for her daughter. Or at least we are going to find out?

Descender #10 (Image Comics) – The space adventures of Tim 21 continue on the Robot Resistance’s Machine Moon home world. A new group (‘The Between’) and character (‘Queen Between’) are to be introduced in this issue.

The Last Contract #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The assassin Old Man with No Name is on the hunt for the rat bastard who exposed his kill list. And he ain’t taking no prisoners.

Last Sons of America (BOOM! Studios) – Don Carlo is about to open a Mexican Can of Whoop’ Ass on Jackie and Julian.  I guess they shouldn’t have gotten involved with the Don’s Star Wars quoting daughter.

Snow Blind #3 (BOOM! Studios) – Trent is one messed up kid, and now he knows everything about the WITSEC program and his family.

 

Elana

Top Pick: Constantine The Hellblazer TP Volume 1 (DC Comics)Constantine is DC’s best comic and this is the place to start for fans both new and old. It holds the blend of dark humor, self destructive lust, creepy magic and relatable melancholy that’s required in a Constantine comic. Yet the stories and creative art feel all new. And hurray, one of the writers is a bisexual man writing a bisexual male lead.

Top Pick: Jonesy #1 (of 4) (BOOM! Studios/BOOM! Box) – Love is dumb! Thus spaketh many a young rebel such as Jonesy, the protagonist of this new all-ages miniseries. She has the superpower to make people fall in love, but not with her. While she revels in being unique and an outsider she also wants to be accepted– in-spite of herself. Cute and bold art that’s half punk/half cartoon feels very contemporary and young.  This is writer Sam Humphries’s second latina teen protagonist (the other stars in Marvel’s Weirdworld which you should also be buying).

All-New Wolverine #5 (Marvel) – Laura Kinney teams up with The Wasp! I love this series’ character development and consistent feminist awesomeness. Laura is a complex female superhero and we’ve been hungry for that.

Black Canary #8 (DC Comics) – A mysterious ninja is stalking Dinah. I think I know who it is. Fantastic rock and roll art and interesting stories featuring a great female cast make this series easy to love.

No Mercy #7 (Image Comics) – After last issue’s climax how are you not reading this?! Completely suspenseful, realistic and accessible to non-comics readers. It’s sort of the HBO of comics.

Zodiac Starforce #4 (Dark Horse) – The Final issue of a magical girl series I wish I had as a kid (and I never did read Sailor Moon). A charming and inventive all ages comic with a kick-ass diverse and distinctive cast. You’re sure to find a character to identify with. Feels a bit like a technicolor Buffy for kids.

 

Logan

Top Pick: Batman #49 (DC Comics) –  After Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo rewrote the Batman mythos last week to have Bruce Wayne not be motivated by his parents’ death to pick up the cape and cowl, I am interested in how Snyder and guest artist Yanick Paquette put him back in the middle of the action against Mr. Bloom.

Jem and the Holograms Valentine’s Day Special (IDW Publishing) – My favorite part of the Jem and the Holograms series hasn’t been the plots, but the fun characters, art, and romance. This is why I enjoy the various annual and special issues, which can focus on the characters, their interactions, and antics without having to progress the overall plot. Hoping for some Kimber/Stormer adorableness.

Jonesy #1 (of 4) (BOOM! Studios/BOOM! Box) – The BOOM! Box imprint has a strong track record of fun, relatable all ages comics with great cartoonish art, like Lumberjanes and Giant Days. And Jonesy is different with its focus on romance. Also, there can never be enough comics starring members of fandoms.

Jughead #4 (Archie Comics) – Chip Zdarsky and Erica Henderson make for an excellent comedy team, and Jughead is one of the funniest current comics. Each issue, I anticipate the weird and wacky dream sequences in the middle of the comic. Also, Jughead is revealed to be asexual this issue.

Ms. Marvel #4 (Marvel) – I’m really enjoying the new volume of Ms. Marvel, and how Ms. Marvel has to balance being a regular high school student, Avenger, and superhero while also dealing with her name being used by an evil corporation that wants to level her city for expensive condos. Talk about a full course load.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Shaft: Imitation of Life #1 (Dynamite) – David Walker’s first volume for the classic character was fantastic, and this second one is a comic that I’ve been waiting to read since I found out about it many months ago. Walker mastered getting to the basics of John Shaft, what makes the character great, and I’m expecting more of the same.

Descender #10 (Image Comics) – One of my favorite comics out right now. This sci-fi series is as great to read as it is to stare at it’s beautiful pages.

Legend of Wonder Woman #2 (DC Comics) – The Wonder Woman we need. It’s a back to basics take on the character and is right now the best depiction of the character in comics. The first issue was great and shows you can easily do the character right with a solid creative team.

Old Man Logan #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was fantastic, the best debut of any All-New, All-Different Marvel comic. It perfectly captured the “Western” feel of the original story mixed in with a good revenge tale. So good that I don’t care this issue is out just a few weeks later.

Sunflower #4 (451 Media) – This series is just beautiful to look at, and the story rather haunting. A mother trying to get her kid back from a cult, yes please!

Previews Releases Top 100 Graphic Novels for January 2016

Previews has released the top 100 graphic novels for January 2016. Marvel had success with Star Wars. The company had nine of the month’s top ten graphic novels and of those nine four are Star Wars.

Oni Press had success with Invader Zim‘s first volume which came in at #7. Image, which usually dominates graphic novels, had Lazarus Vol. 4: Poison as their top item at #11. DC Comic‘s best-selling graphic novel for January was The Flash Vol. 6: Out of Time at #20. Dark Horse ComicsThe Savage Sword of Conan Vol. 21 was their best at #56. IDW Publishing‘s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Vol. 13: Vengeance Part 2 was their top at #63.

TOP 100 GRAPHIC NOVELS
Based on Total Unit Sales of Products Invoiced in January 2016

QTY
RANK
DESCRIPTION PRICE ITEM CODE VENDOR
1 STAR WARS DARTH VADER TP VOL 02 SHADOWS AND SECRETS $19.99 OCT150987 MAR
2 STAR WARS TP VOL 02 SHOWDOWN ON THE SMUGGLERS MOON $19.99 OCT150986 MAR
3 COLOR YOUR OWN DEADPOOL TP $9.99 NOV150950 MAR
4 DEATH OF WOLVERINE TP $19.99 JUN150829 MAR
5 STAR WARS TP LANDO $16.99 OCT150988 MAR
6 DEADPOOLS SECRET SECRET WARS TP $15.99 OCT150977 MAR
7 INVADER ZIM TP VOL 01 $19.99 OCT151564 ONI
8 THOR TP VOL 01 GODDESS OF THUNDER $19.99 OCT150985 MAR
9 STAR WARS DARTH VADER TP VOL 01 VADER $19.99 JUL150827 MAR
10 CIVIL WAR TP $24.99 JAN072436 MAR
11 LAZARUS TP VOL 4 POISON (MR) $14.99 NOV150672 IMA
12 SAGA TP VOL 05 (MR) $14.99 JUL150565 IMA
13 DEADPOOL FLASHBACKS TP $19.99 MAY150835 MAR
14 SUPERIOR IRON MAN TP VOL 01 INFAMOUS $19.99 OCT150982 MAR
15 STAR WARS TP JOURNEY TO SW FORCE AWAKENS SHATTER EMPIRE $16.99 AUG150915 MAR
16 STAR WARS TP VOL 01 SKYWALKER STRIKES $19.99 MAY150811 MAR
17 SAGA TP VOL 01 (MR) $9.99 AUG120491 IMA
18 WALKING DEAD TP VOL 01 DAYS GONE BYE $14.99 NOV128157-M IMA
19 RAI TP VOL 01 WELCOME TO NEW JAPAN $9.99 AUG141740 VAL
20 FLASH TP VOL 06 OUT OF TIME $16.99 OCT150257 DC
21 DEADPOOL VS THANOS TP $16.99 SEP150876 MAR
22 GRAYSON TP VOL 01 AGENTS OF SPYRAL TP $14.99 OCT150253 DC
23 GRAYSON TP VOL 02 WE ALL DIE AT DAWN $14.99 OCT150254 DC
24 BATMAN BY ED BRUBAKER TP VOL 01 $19.99 OCT150242 DC
25 AFTERLIFE WITH ARCHIE TP VOL 01 ESCAPE FROM RIVERDALE $17.99 FEB140918-M ARC
26 SOUTHERN CROSS TP VOL 01 (MR) $9.99 AUG150495 IMA
27 STARVE TP VOL 01 (MR) $9.99 OCT150605 IMA
28 ULTIMATE END TP $16.99 SEP150866 MAR
29 BATMAN ARKHAM KNIGHT TP VOL 01 $14.99 OCT150245 DC
30 ONE PUNCH MAN GN VOL 01 $9.99 JUN158141 VIZ
31 BATMAN DETECTIVE COMICS TP VOL 06 ICARUS $16.99 OCT150247 DC
32 SUPERGIRL TP VOL 01 THE GIRL OF STEEL $16.99 OCT150252 DC
33 HELLBLAZER TP VOL 12 HOW TO PLAY WITH FIRE (MR) $19.99 OCT150281 DC
34 BATGIRL TP VOL 01 SILENT KNIGHT $19.99 OCT150244 DC
35 SILVER SURFER TP VOL 03 LAST DAYS $17.99 AUG150886 MAR
36 PUNISHER MAX TP VOL 01 COMPLETE COLLECTION (MR) $34.99 OCT150993 MAR
37 BATMAN THE JIRO KUWATA BATMANGA TP VOL 03 (OF 3) $14.99 OCT150250 DC
38 ONE PUNCH MAN GN VOL 04 $9.99 NOV151742 VIZ
39 RED HOOD AND THE OUTLAWS TP VOL 07 LAST CALL $14.99 OCT150260 DC
40 NEW TEEN TITANS TP VOL 04 $19.99 OCT150259 DC
41 BATMAN DETECTIVE COMICS HC VOL 07 ANARKY $24.99 SEP150289 DC
42 ALL NEW X-MEN TP VOL 07 UTOPIANS $19.99 OCT150983 MAR
43 BATMAN THE KILLING JOKE SPECIAL ED HC $17.99 NOV070226 DC
44 FLASH HC VOL 07 SAVAGE WORLD $22.99 SEP150296 DC
45 AVENGERS TIME RUNS OUT TP VOL 03 $19.99 OCT150979 MAR
46 BEE AND PUPPYCAT TP VOL 02 $14.99 NOV151159 BOO
47 JESSICA JONES TP VOL 01 ALIAS (MR) $24.99 JUN150831 MAR
48 SWAMP THING TP VOL 07 SEASONS END $16.99 OCT150262 DC
49 SHOWCASE PRESENTS BATMAN TP VOL 06 $19.99 OCT150261 DC
50 SAGA TP VOL 04 (MR) $14.99 OCT140644 IMA
51 WALKING DEAD TP VOL 02 MILES BEHIND US (NEW PTG) $14.99 SEP088204 IMA
52 SAGA TP VOL 02 (MR) $14.99 APR130443 IMA
53 HOUSE OF M TP WARZONES $15.99 OCT150975 MAR
54 SPIDER-WOMAN TP VOL 02 NEW DUDS $17.99 NOV150946 MAR
55 SANDMAN OVERTURE DELUXE ED HC (MR) $24.99 JUL150333 DC
56 SAVAGE SWORD OF CONAN TP VOL 21 $19.99 SEP150097 DAR
57 DEADPOOL AND CABLE OMNIBUS HC $125.00 JUL140716 MAR
58 BITCH PLANET TP VOL 01 EXTRAORDINARY MACHINE (MR) $9.99 MAY150482 IMA
59 X-MEN TP VOL 01 INFERNO $34.99 OCT150984 MAR
60 SHIELD TP VOL 02 MAN CALLED DEATH $17.99 NOV150945 MAR
61 SONIC MEGA MAN WORLDS COLLIDE COMPLETE EPIC TP $29.99 FEB150982-M ARC
61 GUARDIANS OF GALAXY HC VOL 02 $34.99 JUL150826 MAR
63 TMNT ONGOING TP VOL 13 VENGEANCE PT 2 $17.99 NOV150369 IDW
64 AMAZING SPIDER-MAN HC VOL 01 $34.99 OCT150969 MAR
65 INHUMANS TP ATTILAN RISING $16.99 NOV150941 MAR
66 SAGA TP VOL 03 (MR) $14.99 JAN140556 IMA
67 DAREDEVIL EPIC COLLECTION TP TOUCH OF TYPHOID $39.99 OCT150991 MAR
67 DOCTOR WHO 2015 FOUR DOCTORS HC $19.99 AUG151715 TTN
69 DEADPOOL KILLS MARVEL UNIVERSE TP $14.99 AUG120709 MAR
70 BATMAN TP VOL 01 THE COURT OF OWLS (N52) $16.99 DEC120323 DC
71 WALKING DEAD TP VOL 24 LIFE AND DEATH (MR) $14.99 JUN150590 IMA
72 MY LITTLE PONY EQUESTRIA GIRLS TP $17.99 NOV150426 IDW
73 BATMAN SUPERMAN WONDER WOMAN TRINITY DLX ED HC $29.99 SEP150286 DC
74 MMW SUB MARINER HC VOL 07 $75.00 JUL150824-M MAR
75 SHUTTER TP VOL 03 QUO VADIS (MR) $14.99 OCT150609 IMA
75 DEADPOOL TP VOL 01 DEAD PRESIDENTS NOW $15.99 MAR130727 MAR
77 RICK & MORTY TP VOL 01 $19.99 JUL151482 ONI
78 ONE PUNCH MAN GN VOL 03 $9.99 SEP151697 VIZ
79 GUARDIANS TEAM-UP TP VOL 02 UNLIKELY STORY $16.99 OCT150980 MAR
80 SEX TP VOL 04 DAISY CHAINS (MR) $14.99 NOV150692 IMA
81 DEADPOOL CLASSIC OMNIBUS HC VOL 01 $125.00 SEP150859 MAR
82 MIND MGMT HC VOL 06 THE IMMORTALS $19.99 SEP150068 DAR
82 RASPUTIN TP VOL 02 (MR) $14.99 NOV150688 IMA
84 ASTONISHING SPIDER-MAN AND WOLVERINE PREM HC $24.99 MAY110733 MAR
85 ONE PUNCH MAN GN VOL 02 $9.99 JUN158140 VIZ
86 GROOT PREM HC $24.99 NOV150925 MAR
87 BATMAN HUSH COMPLETE TP $24.99 MAY090178 DC
88 WALKING DEAD COMPENDIUM TP VOL 01 (MR) $59.99 MAR092419 IMA
89 BOOK OF DEATH TP $14.99 NOV151724 VAL
90 BATMAN DARK KNIGHT RETURNS TP $19.99 NOV118095 DC
91 AGE OF REPTILES ANCIENT EGYPTIANS TP $14.99 SEP150062 DAR
92 SHADOWLAND PREM HC BLOOD ON STREETS $19.99 JAN110835 MAR
93 X-MEN BY CLAREMONT AND LEE OMNIBUS HC VOL 02 $125.00 AUG110684 MAR
94 100 BULLETS TP BOOK 04 (MR) $24.99 OCT150272 DC
95 MS MARVEL TP VOL 01 NO NORMAL $15.99 JUN140725 MAR
96 WHAT IF TP INFINITY $14.99 NOV150944 MAR
97 WICKED & DIVINE TP VOL 01 THE FAUST ACT (MR) $9.99 SEP140684 IMA
98 ARMOR WARS WARZONES TP $16.99 NOV150937 MAR
99 DESCENDER TP VOL 01 TIN STARS (MR) $9.99 JUL150554 IMA
100 STAR WARS PRINCESS LEIA TP $16.99 JUN150822 MAR

Previews Releases Top 100 Comics for January 2016

Previews has released the top 100 comics in January 2016. As is not a surprise Robert Kirkman‘s The Walking Dead #150 from Skybound and Image Comics topped the chart.

Marvel held eight of the top ten titles mostly of new debuts and Star Wars related comics. Secret Wars #9, which wrapped up the event, was their best selling comic and came in second.

Batman was DC Comics‘ one book in the top ten. Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo’s Batman #48 came in at #9.

Dark Horse Comics‘ top book was Hellboy Winter Special 2016 at #137. IDW Publishing‘s Back to the Future #4 ranked #99 for the month. BOOM! Studios‘ found success with Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #0 at #39.

Check out the full list below.

TOP 100 COMIC BOOKS
Based on Total Unit Sales of Products Invoiced in January 2016

QTY
RANK
DESCRIPTION PRICE ITEM CODE VENDOR
1 WALKING DEAD #150 (MR) $2.99 NOV150561-M IMA
2 SECRET WARS #9 $4.99 OCT150729-M MAR
3 SPIDER-MAN DEADPOOL #1 $3.99 NOV150751-M MAR
4 STAR WARS #14 $3.99 OCT150945-M MAR
5 STAR WARS #15 $3.99 NOV150920-M MAR
6 OLD MAN LOGAN #1 $4.99 NOV150733-M MAR
7 OBI-WAN AND ANAKIN #1 $3.99 NOV150910-M MAR
8 BATMAN #48 $3.99 NOV150219-M DC
9 DARTH VADER #15 $3.99 NOV150917-M MAR
10 UNCANNY X-MEN #1 $3.99 OCT150769-M MAR
11 AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #6 $3.99 NOV150841-M MAR
12 A-FORCE #1 $3.99 OCT150736-M MAR
13 MIGHTY THOR #3 $3.99 NOV150781-M MAR
14 DEADPOOL #5 $3.99 NOV150895-M MAR
15 ROCKET RACCOON AND GROOT #1 $3.99 NOV150745-M MAR
16 DEADPOOL #6 $3.99 NOV150897-M MAR
17 SILVER SURFER #1 $3.99 NOV150763-M MAR
18 ALL NEW ALL DIFFERENT AVENGERS #3 $3.99 OCT150878-M MAR
19 ALL NEW ALL DIFFERENT AVENGERS #4 $3.99 NOV150784-M MAR
20 AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #1.2 $3.99 OCT150860-M MAR
21 UNCANNY X-MEN #2 $3.99 OCT150772-M MAR
22 CAPTAIN MARVEL #1 $3.99 NOV150738-M MAR
23 DOCTOR STRANGE #4 $3.99 NOV150871-M MAR
24 BATMAN TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES #2 $3.99 NOV150250-M DC
25 ALL NEW X-MEN #3 $3.99 OCT150811-M MAR
26 SAGA #33 (MR) $2.99 NOV150635 IMA
27 ALL NEW WOLVERINE #4 $3.99 NOV150892-M MAR
28 INVINCIBLE IRON MAN #5 $3.99 NOV150732 MAR
29 SPIDER-GWEN #4 $3.99 NOV150838-M MAR
30 JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #7 $3.99 NOV150173-M DC
31 EXTRAORDINARY X-MEN #6 $3.99 NOV150888 MAR
32 EXTRAORDINARY X-MEN #5 $3.99 OCT150815 MAR
33 UNCANNY AVENGERS #4 $3.99 NOV150788-M MAR
34 TRUE BELIEVERS DEADPOOL #1 $1.00 NOV150859 MAR
35 GUARDIANS OF GALAXY #4 $3.99 NOV150814-M MAR
36 DAREDEVIL #3 $3.99 NOV150850-M MAR
37 DETECTIVE COMICS #48 $3.99 NOV150231-M DC
38 HARLEY QUINN #24 $3.99 NOV150236-M DC
39 MIGHTY MORPHIN POWER RANGERS #0 $3.99 NOV151136 BOO
40 TOTALLY AWESOME HULK #2 $3.99 NOV150775-M MAR
41 BATMAN AND ROBIN ETERNAL #14 $2.99 NOV150223 DC
42 BATMAN AND ROBIN ETERNAL #15 $2.99 NOV150224 DC
43 DEADPOOL AND CABLE SPLIT SECOND #2 $4.99 NOV150891 MAR
44 BATMAN AND ROBIN ETERNAL #16 $2.99 NOV150225 DC
45 PAPER GIRLS #4 $2.99 NOV150626 IMA
46 KANAN #10 $3.99 NOV150923 MAR
47 SUPERMAN #48 $3.99 NOV150215-M DC
48 BATMAN AND ROBIN ETERNAL #17 $2.99 NOV150226 DC
49 GREEN LANTERN #48 $3.99 NOV150244-M DC
50 AGENTS OF SHIELD #1 $3.99 NOV150768-M MAR
51 UNCANNY INHUMANS #4 $3.99 NOV150818-M MAR
52 ROBIN WAR #2 $4.99 NOV150238-M DC
53 VISION #3 $3.99 NOV150795-M MAR
54 BATMAN SUPERMAN #28 $3.99 NOV150211-M DC
55 SPIDEY #2 $3.99 NOV158416-M MAR
56 SILK #3 $3.99 NOV150832-M MAR
57 NEW AVENGERS #5 $3.99 NOV150787 MAR
58 WONDER WOMAN #48 $3.99 NOV150205-M DC
59 MS MARVEL #3 $3.99 NOV150824-M MAR
60 ACTION COMICS #48 $3.99 NOV150209-M DC
61 CARNAGE #4 $3.99 NOV150828-M MAR
62 POISON IVY CYCLE OF LIFE AND DEATH #1 $2.99 NOV150166-M DC
63 ROBIN SON OF BATMAN #8 $3.99 NOV150242-M DC
64 GRAYSON #16 $3.99 NOV150234-M DC
65 ULTIMATES #3 $3.99 NOV150797-M MAR
66 SUPERMAN WONDER WOMAN #25 $3.99 NOV150213-M DC
67 CAPTAIN AMERICA SAM WILSON #5 $3.99 NOV150794 MAR
68 SWAMP THING #1 $2.99 NOV150169-M DC
69 HOWARD THE DUCK #3 $4.99 NOV158411-M MAR
70 SUPERMAN AMERICAN ALIEN #3 $3.99 NOV150207-M DC
71 SPIDER-MAN 2099 #5 $3.99 NOV150840-M MAR
72 DEATHSTROKE #14 $2.99 NOV150181-M DC
73 GUARDIANS OF INFINITY #2 $4.99 NOV150805-M MAR
74 CONTEST OF CHAMPIONS #4 $3.99 NOV150878-M MAR
75 ALL NEW HAWKEYE #3 $3.99 NOV150876-M MAR
76 BATGIRL #47 $2.99 OCT150210 DC
77 GREEN LANTERN CORPS EDGE OF OBLIVION #1 $2.99 NOV150162-M DC
78 RED WOLF #2 $3.99 NOV150846-M MAR
79 VENOM SPACE KNIGHT #3 $3.99 NOV150807-M MAR
80 ASTONISHING ANT-MAN #4 $3.99 NOV150803-M MAR
81 ALL NEW INHUMANS #3 $3.99 NOV150822-M MAR
82 SCARLET WITCH #2 $3.99 NOV150777-M MAR
83 I HATE FAIRYLAND #4 (MR) $3.50 NOV150612-M IMA
84 WEB WARRIORS #3 $3.99 NOV150830-M MAR
85 LEGEND OF WONDER WOMAN #1 $3.99 NOV150164-M DC
86 NEW SUICIDE SQUAD #16 $2.99 NOV150196 DC
87 STARFIRE #8 $2.99 NOV150197-M DC
88 TEEN TITANS #16 $2.99 NOV150199-M DC
89 SPIDER-WOMAN #3 $3.99 NOV150834-M MAR
90 SUPERMAN LOIS AND CLARK #4 $3.99 NOV150217-M DC
91 INVADER ZIM #6 $3.99 OCT151570-M ONI
92 TITANS HUNT #4 $3.99 NOV150201-M DC
93 SQUADRON SUPREME #3 $3.99 NOV150779-M MAR
94 NOVA #3 $3.99 NOV150800-M MAR
95 AQUAMAN #48 $3.99 NOV150175-M DC
96 RED HOOD ARSENAL #8 $2.99 NOV150194-M DC
97 TOKYO GHOST #5 (MR) $3.99 NOV150658-M IMA
98 STAR-LORD #3 $3.99 NOV150816-M MAR
99 BACK TO THE FUTURE #4 [*] $3.99 NOV150405-M IDW
100 OUTCAST BY KIRKMAN & AZACETA #15 (MR) $2.99 NOV150625 IMA

Deadpool Superb Owl TV Spot

Based upon Marvel Comics’ most unconventional anti-hero, Deadpool tells the origin story of former Special Forces operative turned mercenary Wade Wilson, who after being subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers, adopts the alter ego Deadpool. Armed with his new abilities and a dark, twisted sense of humor, Deadpool hunts down the man who nearly destroyed his life.

Marvel’s Captain America: Civil War – Big Game Spot

Choose your side with the latest preview for Marvel‘s Captain America: Civil War, in theaters May 6!

Black Widow #1 Reunites Eisner Award Winners Waid & Samnee in March!

She is the Marvel Universe’s most dangerous super-spy. Capable of hunting her targets with lethal precision. But what happens when the hunter…becomes the hunted? This March, the Black Widow becomes…S.H.I.E.L.D.’s MOST WANTED! And it’s all happening in Black Widow #1 – the brand new series from Eisner Award winning Daredevil creative team. Writer Mark Waid, artist Chris Samnee, colorist Matt Wilson and letterer Joe Caramagna re-team for the next explosive chapter in Natasha’s life!

She has spent years gathering secrets. Knowledge and intel on friends and enemies alike. But when some of those dark secrets mysteriously begin to go public, no one is safe! Now, Natasha has become the one thing she never thought she’d be – public enemy number one! Betrayed by her former accomplices, with friend and foe alike nipping at her heels, all bets are off. With a lifetime of training and ingenuity at her disposal, she’s out for answers, and she’s going to get them any way she can. As long as S.H.I.E.L.D. doesn’t get her first!

Prepare for a knock-down, drag-out tale of action, adventure and espionage! All eyes are on the Black Widow. With her enemies closing in at every side, it’s time to show everyone why she is and always will be the world’s greatest spy.

BLACK WIDOW #1 (JAN160743)
Written by CHRIS SAMNEE & MARK WAID
Art & Cover by CHRIS SAMNEE & MATT WILSON
Hip-Hop Variant by PHIL NOTO (JAN160744)
Variant Cover by TULA LOTAY (JAN160745)
Young Variant by SKOTTIE YOUNG (JAN160746)
Action Figure Variant by JOHN TYLER CHRISTOPHER (JAN160747)
Women of Power Variant by KEVIN WADA (JAN160748)
FOC – 02/08/16, On-Sale – 03/02/16

Black_Widow_1_Cover

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