Tag Archives: industry

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

Facebook Population: Over 36,000,000 in the United States

The total population decrease of 2 million. It’s unknown why the decrease, but Facebook has been getting rid of inactive accounts for page likes, so this is a possibility. This is after a massive increase of 6 million the previous month. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 13.68%, and this month is 14.17%. The decrease of population didn’t impact that segment all that much.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 42.63% and men were 57.89%. The population decrease hit the women much more so than the men, so women saw their percentage continue to decrease. Women now account for 41.67% and men 58.33%.

gender 5.1.15We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age. The results are very similar as far as the shape of how it lays out.

gender age 5.1.15Compared to last month, the population loss is mostly those age 18 to 29. Under 17, as well as those over the age of 50 saw gains.

gender age raw 5.1.15Relationship Status

Most of the percentages are the same. Those that are single increased a little bit, and those engaged decreased a little bit. Most of the other stats are similar to last month.

relationship 5.1.15And for those that like pie charts.

relationship pie chart 5.1.15Education

Compared to last month, the percentages are very similar.

education 5.1.15Gender Interest

The biggest shifts compared to last month is women interesting in “men and women,” and men who didn’t specify what they’re interested in.

relationship interest 5.1.15Ethnicity

Six months in and the stats for ethnicity have been pretty steady. Facebook compiles the data based on “behavior that aligns with people of that race.” It’s unknown the specifics of what that entails.

African Americans account for 3.7 million, about 10.28% of the comic fandom, while all Hispanics account for 8 million, around 22.22%. Asian Americans account for 860,000, or about 5.73%. There’s some slight differences since last month, but nothing vast.

ethnicity 5.1.15Generation

We can see here the shifts in the age from above. Baby Boomers increased, and Generation X and Millennials both decreased.

generation 5.1.15And that wraps up this month’s report! Join us this coming Monday for even more information!

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month, and first of the year, and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

This data is important in that it shows who the potential comic audience could be. This is not purchasers, these are people who have shown an affinity for comics and are potential purchasers and those with an interest.

Facebook Population: Over 38,000,000 in the United States

That’s a massive increase of 6 million individuals over the past month. Both the “comics” general term and “Marvel” have had massive growth, which would explain the increase. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 13.75%, and this month is also 13.68%, dipping a bit compared to last month.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 41.88% and men were 56.88%. Even with the population increase, the results this month as far as percent the results are close to last month. Women now account for 42.63% and men account for 57.89%. The female population increased a bit in both percentage and raw number.

There is a negative amount in “unknown” due to Facebook’s rounding of large numbers. Other stats like age and “relationship status” peg the population between 37.4 million and 37.5 million.

gender 4.1.15We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age. Compared to last month we see a sharp decline in interest, and last month we saw a steady decline.

gender age 4.1.15When it comes to percentages, those over the age of 45 grew in their percentage of the population. Men also regained a slight majority in those age 17 and under.

gender age raw 4.1.15Relationship Status

Compared to last month, the single population dipped a bit, while there were more people married and also unspecified as to their relationship status.

relationship status 4.1.15And for those that like pie charts.

relationship status pie chart 4.1.15Education

Generally, these stats are similar to last month’s. Changes are primarily due to the shift in gender.

education 4.1.15Gender Interest

Compared to last month these stats are very similar. Even with a large gain of individuals, the percentages remained steady.

gender interest 4.1.15Ethnicity

It’s the fifth month we’ve had data on ethnicity. Facebook compiles the data based on “behavior that aligns with people of that race.” It’s unknown the specifics of what that entails.

This is the third month to include Asian Americans in this stat. The population is small, but has grown a little as expected it would since the launch.

African Americans account for 3.8 million, about 10% of the comic fandom, while all Hispanics account for 8.4 million, around 22.11%. Asian Americans account for 920,000 individuals, around 5.68%. All but African Americans grew in number, but none grew enough in relation to the overall population growth, so they all slipped as far as percentage of the population.

I’ve presented the data in raw form for this first report, but will do graphs as this data progresses.

ethinicty 4.1.15Generation

We’ve been tracking what generation individuals are a part of. We present that information for the second time below. Growth occurred across the board, with the majority of growth in Millennials.

generation 4.1.15And that wraps up this month’s report! Join us this coming Monday for even more information!

Demo-Graphics: The Walking Dead

Its been about five months since we last looked at The Walking Dead‘s demographics via Facebook’s data. With the new season underway, it felt like an appropriate time to see how things have changed for the record setting show, and best selling comic book series.

For this report, we’re looking at fans within the United States that enjoy The Walking Dead in comics, television, books, games, or even the characters. We’ll also compare the latest results to those of last report.

Facebook Population: Over 22 million fans in the US

That’s an increase of about 4.2 million fans since last year. Spanish speakers account for 3 million fans, 13.64%. That’s over the double amount of individuals since October.

Gender and Age

In October we saw a surge of female fans compared to the stats from 2013. Women account for 47.19% and men were 52.81%. Five months later, and women continue to grow in fans so that men and women are split even. Due to the rounding of numbers when dealing with these large number, men account for 50.91% and women 51.82%. Looking at the relationship status which pegs the universe at 22.8 million, women account for 50.01% of fans while men are 49.27%. The gender of the fans is split evenly.

wd gender 3.30.15Below is the trend line which looks at the age and gender of the individuals together.

wd age and gender 3.30.15Below is the raw data for The Walking Dead fans. The population has shifted slightly older compared to last year.

wd age and gender raw 3.30.15

Relationship Status

The biggest shift compared to October is those married who now account for a little over 30% compared to 24% then.

wd relationship 3.30.15And for those that like pie charts.

wd relationship pie chart 3.30.15

Education

Like relationships, education has changed a lot since last year, so we can’t really compare this year’s stats to last year’s.

wd education 3.30.15Gender Interest

Gender interest too has changed since last year. The biggest change is those who are unspecified, which rose across the board.

wd gender interest 3.30.15Ethnicity

This is also the first report where ethnicity is tracked for The Walking Dead. Interestingly African American women are a majority of fans for African Americans.

wd ethnicity 3.30.15Generation

When it comes to generational labels women account for a vast majorty of those interested in The Walking Dead for Baby Boomers and Generation X. It shouldn’t be surprising considering how the genders shift as the population ages.

wd generation 3.30.15

And that wraps up the latest edition of the Facebook Fandom Spotlight.

Demo-Graphics: Women’s History Month

The first day of each month (and a lot of Mondays) I break down the demographic data of those who “like” comics on Facebook. With about 32 million people this past month, the data represents those with an interest in comics (over 100 terms made up of publishers, generic terms like “comics,” and comic specific terms like “one-shot”). These are not necessarily purchasers or subscribers, they’d be a subset of this group, these are folks who are interested in comics, graphic novels, trade paperbacks, or publishers. That 32 million is the first audience we as a community should be reaching out to to push comics forward. They are the most likely to be interested in comics, and become regular readers and customers.

But, any good marketer knows, that demographic data is just one small portion of who a “customer” is. To truly get the whole picture of who these individuals are, and get even better bang for the buck, you also need to understand their interests and habits.

With the call to “push comics forward,” I’ve dug further into the data showing what else individuals might like, allowing marketers to better target potential comic fans. Last month was the first post of this type looking at the general comic Facebook fandom. For the second one, it felt appropriate to look at just women to kick off “Women’s History Month.”

Why is this important?

Someone’s age, gender, or ethnicity is just a small part of the equation when figuring out who to market to or what to market. A person’s history of purchases in this case, or what else they’re interested in helps to not only target to the individual, but find others like them. Gender, age, and ethnicity is the broad categories and helps with messaging, but now we’re getting into the specifics!

The Specifics

Again, we’re able to dive into Facebook for this data, using the exact same terms used for the monthly reports. The only difference is this data is for those 18 and up, while our monthly demographic report is 13 and up. Facebook data is enhanced using available data warehouses giving us a better idea as to who these people are.

And now, the data!

Age and Gender

Without the men, this data isn’t quite as useful, but we can see almost half of the fans are under the age of 35.

age_and_gender_3.2.15Lifestyle

Surprisingly, women are very close to the general Facebook population. For none of the lifestyle categories do women really stand out.

Lifestyle_1_3.2.15 Lifestyle_2_3.2.15 Lifestyle_3_3.2.15 Lifestyle_4_3.2.15Relationship Status and Education Level

The general comic fan population were more likely to be single or “in a relationship” compared to the Facebook populace. Women on the other hand are less likely to be single, and more likely to be married. When it comes to education, they’re more likely to be in grad school when the general comic populace is very much less likely.

relationship_education_3.2.15Job Title

For the general comic populace, the healthcare industry was a tthe bottom. When it comes to women, those professions are at the top along with administrative positions. It’s almost the exact opposite of the general comic fandom on Facebook.

Job_Title_1_3.2.15 Job_Title_2_3.2.15 Job_Title_3_3.2.15Page Likes

When it comes to the types of pages female comic fans on Facebook like, it’s health, beauty, clothing, and accessories that are at the top spot. For the general comic fandom, Manga, and a comic blog sit at the top of the list. In this list, the most “comic” related category is in Product/Service where Hello Kitty is listed.

Page_Likes_Top_Categories_1_3.2.15 Page_Likes_Top_Categories_2_3.2.15Marvel has been heading to The View to promote comics, but they might do better to target the viewers of The Ellen DeGeneres Show. Also, putting comics in a big box store like Target might be worth it too. IDW has done so with their Micro-Fun Pack line, and found success.

Page_Likes_1.3.2.15 Page_Likes_2.3.2.15 Page_Likes_3.3.2.15

 Location

Comic fans are located in big cities according to this and women aren’t an exception. The top spots are flipped though.

Cities_Percent_1_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_2_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_3_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_4_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_5_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_6_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_7_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_8_3.2.15 Cities_Percent_9_3.2.15Interestingly though, comic fans also over represent in smaller cities and towns. The cities are very different though compared to the general comic population. Having worked a comic shop in Buffalo, I can vouch for that.

Cities_Over_1_3.2.15They’re also underrepresented in larger cities. But, it’s a very different set of large cities. Bellevue, Washington has the distinction for being at the bottom for women and the general comic populace.

Cities_Under_3.2.15Frequency of Activity

Female comic fans also like more pages than the general comic populace, but it’s half as many. Female comic fans are even more likely to like posts or click ads compared to the general comic fandom.

Frequency_of_Activities_3.2.15Devices

Women interestingly really stand out as iPad users, though are pretty much in-line with the general Facebook populace for the rest of the devices used.

Device_Users_3.2.15Household

Female comic fans seem to make a bit more than the general Facebook population, but are slightly more likely to rent their home.

Household_Income_Ownership Household_size_3.2.15

 Spending Methods

Female comic fans almost line up exactly the same as the general Facebook populace. Where general comic fans are more likely to primarily use cash and less likely to primarily use credit cards, you don’t see that with the women.

Spending_Methods_3.2.15Their online purchasing habits are pretty similar to Facebook users, but they’re a little bit more likely to spend money at retail, unlike the general comic Facebook fans who are slightly less likely.

Retail_Spending_Online_Purchases_3.2.15They also are slightly more likely to purchase kids products, household products, and health and beauty products. This should be no surprise based on the pages liked. What it does tell me is that I might run an ad campaign targeting this population which features a comic book where kids are the main audience.

Purchase_Behavior_3.2.15And that wraps up our second look at the affinity and actual interests of our monthly comic fandom! Expect for even more of a dive in and explanation of how one would use this data in the coming weeks and months!

Most importantly, to really build the comic market, we need to understand who the fans and purchasers are. By doing so, we make our job easier. The above is a piece of that puzzle.

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month, and first of the year, and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

This data is important in that it shows who the potential comic audience could be. This is not purchasers, these are people who have shown an affinity for comics and are potential purchasers and those with an interest.

Facebook Population: Over 32,000,000 in the United States

The total population remains steady from the previous month. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 14.38%, and this month is also 13.75%, dipping a bit compared to last month.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 45.64% and men were 53.13%. Even with the population increase, the results this month as far as percent the results are close to last month. Women now account for 41.88% and men account for 56.88%. The female population continues to decrease, this time not just in percent, but also the total population.

gender 3.1.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

age and gender 3.1.15Men gained pretty consistently under the age of 49. Women under the age of 17 continued to be the majority for that age group and gained in population, while women generally decreased in all other age groups.

age and gender raw 3.1.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last month, the single population dipped a bit, while there were more people married and engaged people. Congrats!

relationship status 3.1.15And for those that like pie charts.

relationship status pie chart 3.1.15

Education

Generally, these stats are similar to last month’s. Changes are primarily due to the shift in gender.

education 3.1.15

Gender Interest

Compared to last month these stats are very similar. Changes are primarily due to the shift in gender.

gender interest 3.1.15

Ethnicity

It’s the fourth month we’ve had data on ethnicity. Facebook compiles the data based on “behavior that aligns with people of that race.” It’s unknown the specifics of what that entails.

This is the second month to include Asian Americans in this stat. The population is small, but expect it to grow as the months go forward.

African Americans account for 3.8 million, about 11.88% of the comic fandom, while all Hispanics account for 7.4 million, around 23.13%. Asian Americans account for 840,000 individuals, around 6.27%.

I’ve presented the data in raw form for this first report, but will do graphs as this data progresses.

ethnicity 3.1.15

Generation

We’ve been tracking what generation individuals are a part of. We present that information for the first time below.

generation 3.1.15

And that wraps up this month’s report! Join us Monday for even more information!

Black (Comic) History Month: Demo-Graphics, African Americans & Comic Publishers

For Black History Month we’ve been taking a look at characters, series, and creators, but I thought it also might be nice to also look at some of the demographic data that exists. The first thing I wanted to see was if African-American comic fans varied as to what publisher they liked.

For this demographic report I again dove into Facebook using the data provided as per usual. In February, African-Americans accounted for 3.4 million of the 32 million “comic fans,” making them 10.63% of the population. In general on Facebook, African-Americans make up 11.24% of the Facebook population.

I decided to look at not just publishers, but “comics” and “manga” as well to see what the percentage of African-Americans like them as well as how it breaks down as far as men and women.

In general for all of the terms below African-Americans account for 10.83% of that population. Marvel, DC Comics, Dark Horse, Dynamite, and in general comics underperform that percentage. Image, IDW, BOOM!, Oni, and Manga outperform. BOOM! and Oni especially do well having the top two percentages.

When it comes to percentage, men and women are the closest for Image, Comics and Manga. The biggest difference between men and women is Dark Horse.

AA Comic Data 2.9.15This is just the first report! I’ve got two more Mondays to dive even deeper into the information.

Demo-Graphics: Beyond Gender, Age, and Ethnicity

The first day of each month (and a lot of Mondays) I break down the demographic data of those who “like” comics on Facebook. With about 32 million people this past month, the data represents those with an interest in comics (over 100 terms made up of publishers, generic terms like “comics,” and comic specific terms like “one-shot”). These are not necessarily purchasers or subscribers, they’d be a subset of this group, these are folks who are interested in comics, graphic novels, trade paperbacks, or publishers. That 32 million is the first audience we as a community should be reaching out to to push comics forward. They are the most likely to be interested in comics, and become regular readers and customers.

But, any good marketer knows, that demographic data is just one small portion of who a “customer” is. To truly get the whole picture of who these individuals are, and get even better bang for the buck, you also need to understand their interests and habits.

With the call to “push comics forward,” I am happy to present for the first time these habits and affinity, and explain why this is important.

Why is this important?

Someone’s age, gender, or ethnicity is just a small part of the equation when figuring out who to market to or what to market. A person’s history of purchases in this case, or what else they’re interested in helps to not only target to the individual, but find others like them. Gender, age, and ethnicity is the broad categories and helps with messaging, but now we’re getting into the specifics!

The Specifics

Again, we’re able to dive into Facebook for this data, using the exact same terms used for the monthly reports. The only difference is this data is for those 18 and up, while our monthly demographic report is 13 and up. Facebook data is enhanced using available data warehouses giving us a better idea as to who these people are.

And now, the data!

Age and Gender

We can see the similar breakdown of percentages as I’ve been presenting for some time now. We get to see how that compares though to the Facebook population as a whole.

2015-02-02_1418Lifestyle

This is everyone’s interest data based on their actual purchase behavior, brand affinity, and other activities. Interestingly enough, comic fans are much greater than the general Facebook population in having children early in life. They tend to be renters, and still in school. On the flip side those in their mid-20s without children and owning their own home are also over represented by comic fans as well as similar folks with children.

Not surprisingly, the wealthy and “elite,” established, and elderly are under represented in the population.

Younger individuals with and without children are the bread and butter of the comic fandom in other words.

lifestyle_1 lifestyle_2 lifestyle_3Relationship Status and Education Level

Compared to the general Facebook populace, comic fans are much more likely to be “single,” “in a relationship,” or “engaged.” They are much less likely to be “married.” As far as education, they are slightly more likely to be college educated. Take the above and we’re looking for younger college educated individuals.

2015-02-02_1429Job Title

This is rather interesting. Based on likely industries from self-reported data, we have groups of what types of jobs comic fans have. It’s not surprising that with a younger set of individuals, the positions are less established with folks more likely temporary and seasonal, retail, food preparation, service industry positions.

They are much less likely lawyers, in the medical field, in computing or mathematics or in the science industry. Most of those involve longer career commitments, so comic fans might not be  there yet. Remember, they’re mostly young and in college.

job_title_1 job_title_2 job_title_3Page Likes

When it comes to what pages comic fans like, most shouldn’t be a surprise. We see lots fo video games, Marvel, DC Comics, comic characters, and Stan Lee. What’s also interesting is we see Loot Crate (showing a nice overlap and business decision to include comics in the service) and some fascinating bands.

2015-02-02_1434But how do those page interests compare to the rest of Facebook? We have that below! If I wanted to build a brand, I’d look at these pages first when targeting ads (along with the previous data mentioned). So far we have men, who are in college, in service jobs, and like Iron Man.

page_affinity_1 page_affinity_2Location

Comic fans are located in big cities according to this.

location_1 location_2 location_3 location_4 location_5Interestingly though, comic fans also over represent in smaller cities and towns.

location_overrepresentThey’re also underrepresented in larger cities.

location_underrepresentFrequency of Activity

Comic fans are also rather active on Facebook, liking commenting, sharing, likely, and clicking ads more than the average Facebook user.

frequency_of_activityDevices

Comic fans use a mix of mobile and desktop to access Facebook and are more prone to using Android devices… Yet we see iOs devices launched first for digital comic apps…

devicesHousehold

Comic fans tend to live alone or in larger households and rent.

home_1 home_2Spending Methods

Comic fans also primarily use cash, which makes sense since younger individuals might not have credit built up. They also spend much less on “travel & entertainment,” and “premium” things compared to the general Facebook users.

spendingIndividuals also are pretty average in their spending, while more likely to spend online or not spend online at all. They are also much less likely to be on the low end of online spending. Good news for digital comics!

spending_2What’s really interesting is the comic audience’s purchase behavior is lower for every category compared to the general Facebook population. Since they are generally even in spending compared to the audience, we can assume they’re buying something else…. comics maybe?

purchase_behaviorAnd that wraps up our first look at the affinity and actual interests of our monthly comic fandom! Expect for even more of a dive in and explanation of how one would use this data in the coming weeks and months!

Most importantly, to really build the comic market, we need to understand who the fans and purchasers are. By doing so, we make our job easier. The above is a piece of that puzzle.

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month, and first of the year, and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

This data is important in that it shows who the potential comic audience could be. This is not purchasers, these are people who have shown an affinity for comics and are potential purchasers and those with an interest. This Monday we’ll have a new portion of this monthly report.

Facebook Population: Over 32,000,000 in the United States

The total population remains steady from the previous month. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 14.38%, and this month is also 14.38%, remaining unchanged..

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 48.13% and men were 50.63%. Even with the population increase, the results this month as far as percent the results are close to last month. Women now account for 45.63% and men account for 53.13%. The decrease in women when it comes to the percentage was gained by men.

gender 1.31.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

gender age 1.31.15Compared to last month, the loss for women was pretty across the board. Women under the age of 17 gained a bit while those 18 and over dropped in population.

gender age raw 1.31.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last month, the single population dipped a bit, while there were more people engaged. Congrats!

relationship 1.31.15And for those that like pie charts.

relationship pie chart 1.31.15

Education

Generally, these stats are similar to last month’s. Changes are primarily due to the shift in gender.

education 1.31.15

Gender Interest

Compared to last month these stats are very similar. Changes are primarily due to the shift in gender.

gender interest 1.31.15

Ethnicity

It’s the third month we’ve had data on ethnicity. Facebook compiles the data based on “behavior that aligns with people of that race.” It’s unknown the specifics of what that entails.

New this month is the inclusion of Asian Americans in this stat. The population is small, but expect it to grow as the months go forward.

African Americans account for 3.4 million, about 10.63% of the comic fandom, while all Hispanics account for 7.4 million, around 23.13%. Asian Americans account for 820,000 individuals, around 5.62%.

I’ve presented the data in raw form for this first report, but will do graphs as this data progresses.

ethnicity 1.31.15Generation

We’ve been tracking what generation individuals are a part of. We present that information for the first time below.

generation 1.31.15And that wraps up this month’s report! Join us Monday for even more information!

Demo-Graphics: Transformers

It’s Monday and that means another dive into Facebook‘s data. This week I thought I’d take a new look at Transformers who are gearing up for a major storyline in IDW Publishing‘s comics as well as tie-in toys from Hasbro.

The last time I looked at the Transformers was in 2013 and since then there’s been some massive changes in Facebook’s toolset that delivers a lot more data.I’ve broken down the data a few ways, but kept it focused on size of the universe and the gender of people who “like” the various terms. There’s a grand total stat where I looked at 128 different terms including character names, series, movies, toys, etc. Then, there’s a break down of specific terms. Finally, I have the gender break down of all of the characters.I think what’s interesting is that most of the percentages for women are in the 40% range, showing how genders like different things, but it’s all pretty consistent.Check out below for all of the various breakdowns.transformers facebook 1.19.15

Comic-Graphics: Weekly Facebook Page Stats

It’s Monday which means a new Marketing Monday and checking out how the various Facebook fanpages have grown or shrunk over the past two weeks.

Overall, the pages continued to grow, this week gaining 293,619, or 0.60%. That’s a decrease from two weeks ago, partially due to a sharp decrease in the generic “comics” page.

There was some decent movement this past week towards the bottom of the list. Some pages hopped multiple spots. Arrows are present to indicate if a page has increased in ranking from the previous week.

facebook overall 1.5.15Marvel remained in the top spot. ComicBook.com has slowed its growth, and I haven’t seen as many ads for it on Facebook.

facebook new likes 1.5.15Comic Book Resources had a solid jump over the past two weeks, with digital platform Comicsfix getting a bump which matches their increased push.

facebook percentage 1.5.15

 

 

 

 

 

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