Tag Archives: graphic novels

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! What are you excited for?

Around the Tubes

Galleycat – John Leguizamo Inks Deal For ‘Ghetto Klown’ Graphic Novel – Interesting.

The Beat – iVerse to relaunch ComicsPLUS in November with uView, import and more – Hmmm.

Comic Vine – Guardians of the Galaxy Soundtrack to be Released on Cassette – Who remembers cassettes?

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

CBR – Fantastic Four #11

CBR – In Real Life

CBR – Ms. Marvel #9

CBR – Sparks Nevada #0

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New York Times Bestselling Duo Return for First Full-Color Adventure Time Original Graphic Novel

BOOM! Studios has announced the latest Adventure Time original graphic novel, the fourth in the series!

This November Kate Leth and Zachary Sterling bring us Adventure Time Vol. 4: Bitter Sweets OGN, and this time it’s in full color.

This graphic novel is an all-new, self-contained story that plays out like an episode of the animated series. It’s that lovely time of year where Princess Bubblegum gets to leave the Candy Kingdom and venture out into the outer limits of Ooo. But when her annual quest to visit old friends takes a dark and unexpected  turn, it’s up to PB and Peppermint Butler to keep the peace by using the true power of friendship. Bitter Sweets is a deliciously twisted adventure with a surprising aftertaste.

The on-sale date for Adventure Time Vol. 4: Bitter Sweets OGN is November 5th. The cover is illustrated by Stephanie Gonzaga and it retails for $12.99.

Adventure Time Vol. 4 Bitter Sweets OGN

Marvel Unlimited Adds Graphic Novels

This week Marvel announced the inclusion of Marvel’s award-winning original graphic novels into the already vast and expansive digital comic library of Marvel Unlimited. Marvel Unlimited and Marvel Unlimited Plus members will now be able to read Marvel’s  Ant-Man: Season One, Daredevil: Season One, Dr. Strange: Season One and more to come throughout the year.

Ant-Man: Season One brings you the origins of the original Avenger, Hank Pym – Ant-Man. In Daredevil: Season One, meet Matt Murdock, one of New York’s finest attorneys by day and swashbuckling crime-fighter Daredevil by night and in Dr. Strange: Season One experience a high-flying, globe-traveling, ghost-battling adventure from the earliest days of Doctor Strange’s training in the mystic arts!

These acclaimed tales are now included with over 15,000 of Marvel’s greatest comics – including the top-selling Age of Ultron event, the star-spanning Guardians of the Galaxy, with most of the first issues from the hugely successful and critically acclaimed All-New Marvel NOW! initiative and more.

Marvel Unlimited members can access some of the most important stories in pop culture history while online, and take twelve digital comics with them on the go via the ground-breaking Marvel Unlimited App (for iPhone®, iPad® & Android™ devices), even when offline!

Accessible through your desktop browser and the Marvel Unlimited mobile app – Marvel Unlimited is a member subscription service that gives members unlimited access to over 15,000 issues of Marvel’s classic and newer titles. More classic and newer issues are added every week – as early as six months after they’re in stores!

AntManSeasonOne DaredevilSeasonOne DrStrangeSeasonOne

Preview: The Collector

The Collector Hardcover

Imprint: Archaia

Writer: Sergio Toppi
Artist: Sergio Toppi

Far from the auction halls of the elite, The Collector seeks out rare and mysterious artifacts across the world. He is at home in the salons of Paris as he is in the jungles of Borneo. Set against the backdrop of late 19th-century colonialism, The Collector is a delightful, swashbuckling adventure!

The late Sergio Toppi remains one of the great master sequential artists whose work inspired a generation of illustrators and comic artists who followed him. The Collector is Toppi’s longest-running original series, now translated into English for the first time since its debut in 1984.

Toppi’s breathtaking line work and composition will leave you staring at his pages for hours. While this oversized edition serves as much as an art book as a comic, the adventures of the globe-scouring, daredevil Collector will appeal to fans of Indiana Jones, Five Ghosts, or Doc Savage.

Collector_HC_cover

Preview: Mishka and the Sea Devil

MISHKA AND THE SEA DEVIL HARDCOVER ALBUM

Writer(s): Xenia Pamfil
Artist Name(s): Xenia Pamfil
Cover Artist(s): Xenia Pamfil
100 Pgs./ FC/ All Ages
$24.99

Eleven days trapped on a mysterious island. Eleven chapters drawn in eleven different styles. One incredible artist. After a chance encounter at sea, fisherman Mishka washes ashore on an uncharted island. Surrounded by monsters and worse, can Mishka survive long enough to solve the mystery of the Sea Devil and return home? Join her, Captain Furball and Admiral Ghost on the adventure of their lives!

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Liz Prince talks Tomboy

Tomboy-3Liz Prince is an up and coming comic book artist, Her Latest work, Tomboy, is a graphic memoir of growing up with elements that will ring true for who ever picks it up. The story is smart, funny, and written with an eye for timing and space that only a master story teller could achieve.

Her other works include Will You Still Love Me if I Wet the Bed, Delayed Replays, and has contributed to BOOM! Studios series Marceline and the Scream Queens. Her Latest work, Tomboy, is a graphic memoir of her life growing up. You can see her other works on her art page.

We chatted over email, and Liz revealed herself as a down to earth artist with goals that are to reach as wide of an audience as she can. Liz is just returning from a promotional tour and had time to answer a couple questions for Graphic Policy

Graphic Policy: What do you hope readers will get from reading Tomboy?

Liz Prince: First and foremost, I hope that readers are entertained.  I didn’t want there to be one point to the story: I want people to take what they will from it.  Of course, there are a lot of messages in the book, but I didn’t want it to be a moral tale, or a lecture, or a lesson.  Hopefully if the reader is experiencing their own gender-related bullying or pressure, they will be inspired to stay the course and just be themselves; if the reader has participated in said bullying or pressure, hopefully they will no longer take part in it; and if the reader has never had any issues with bullying or pressure, hopefully they will be more aware of the ways in which we live in a culture that encourages strict gender rules.

It was very important to me, as a straight, white female, not to be speaking for anyone else’s experience.  I hope that comes through, that this is a very personal story, and it’s not supposed to be about ALL Tomboys or everyone who is gender non-conforming.

GP: At the end of the book you come to terms with a lot of the things that were hurtful and confusing to you growing up and turn it into a great story. Were you encouraged to write, or had you been writing since you were young?

LP: My parents always encouraged me to pursue whatever my interests were, and my main interests always centered around art and cartoons.  When I discovered comics in 3rd grade, and decided that I wanted to draw comics for a living, my parents helped me try to find art classes and mentors and stuff like that.  My dad was a music writer and critic, and my mom had taken art classes at Pratt, so they were both interested in those things themselves.  Because of their enthusiasm, I’ve been drawing comics since I was 9 years old!!

GP: Do you think there is anything that could be done that would help the kids that do not quite fit the ‘gender’ bill?

LP: There are many things that can be done, starting with changing the ways that we teach gender to children; a big part of my book is exploring how children are predisposed to want the simplest explanation, and that leads them to be the most strict gender binary enforcers.  Getting rid of the “blue and pink” mentality of gender, and instead teaching kids that it’s not as simple as being a boy and being girl would certainly set kids on a path of greater acceptance and awareness of the gender spectrum.

GP: Your illustration style is simple while still being expressive.Are there certain things that this particular style of illustration allows that other styles do not?

LP: Very much in line with the Scott McCloud theory in Understanding Comics, wherein the simple smiley face is the icon best suited for people to be able to see themselves in, drawing autobio comics in a simple style allows readers to recognize more of themselves in a character, I think it gives it a more universal feel.  If something is too detailed, it becomes more concrete and specific, and there may be less for someone to latch onto. I don’t consider myself to be a very accomplished artist: I use cartooning for it’s most basic purpose, which is to tell a story.

GP: I really liked your approach to narration: Young Liz struggling through situations and having adult Liz occasionally step in and explain things to the reader. It really allowed the reader to feel not only the confusion that surrounded Young Liz, but also allowed for a very accurate portrayal of coming of age.

There was no projecting of an adult understanding onto the past. Were you trying to portray it this way, and if so, how did you manage keep your adult self out of Young Liz‘s experience?

LP: Writing a book about gender, and looking back at my childhood through the lens of what I understand now, it was really important for me to tell the story from the present, but at the same time, I wanted the scenes from my past to play out in real time.

Adult Liz pretty much vanishes from the narration when I reach 6th grade, because that became the part of the story where I was at an age when I started being able to recognize a lot of these societal pressures for myself.

I wanted the story to evolve in an organic way, but I also wanted it to be fast-paced: drawing a book about my ENTIRE childhood could have easily taken me 5,000 pages, so I had to be very selective about what anecdotes I told, and how I weaved them into the story.

In the end, I’m not sure that I really did keep “adult Liz” and “young Liz” separate, because my current voice narrates the story throughout, but I’m glad to hear that I successfully was able to create that illusion!

GP: Did drawing out scenes give any closure or perhaps new understanding to old memories? Were there any that were particularly difficult to revisit?

LP: There were many things that I recalled with new meaning, as I’ve come to have a greater understanding of the ways that American culture divides the gender lines, and the subjugated role that women play within those lines. Tomboy has a lot of themes of internal misogyny, and I was able to see where a lot of that came from, in direct relation to the things that I was watching and participating in as a kid.

A lot of the bullying stuff still elicited an emotional response from me, which was surprising, but also reinforced to me that these behaviors that we endured as kids can really carry a lot of weight: just because it’s buried somewhere in my mind, doesn’t mean it isn’t still having an impact on me.  Very sobering stuff.

New York Comic Con 2014: Dark Horse Set to Premiere Pander Brothers’ Girlfriend

The Pander Brothers are back and bloodthirsty with Girlfiend, their new vampire crime thriller.

The brothers’ first major work in comics in a decade, this meaty graphic novel finds them going back to what they do best: Taking comics to the edge.

Known for their groundbreaking art in Grendel: Devil’s Legacy, their terrifying Exquisite Corpse series, and their revolutionary epic Triple X, the Pander Brothers now sink their teeth into Girlfiend, a pulp-infused thriller in which a human and his vampire girlfriend hunt the criminal underworld to keep their love alive. Nothing could go wrong with that plan, right?

The Girlfiend graphic novel is in stores April 1, 2015, from Dark Horse Comics.

pander brothers girlfriend

Preview: Last Temptation

Last Temptation

Neil Gaiman (w)
Michael Zulli (a)
Dave McKean (c)
FC • 150+ pages • $39.99

Revisit this tall tale in its new stunning, hardcover format by Neil Gaiman, Alice Cooper, Michael Zulli and Dave McKean! Re-enter the world of the Grand Guignol and the Theatre of the Real as Dynamite celebrates the release of the fully colored and totally remastered version of Alice Cooper and Neil Gaiman’s terrifying series, Last Temptation. Young Steven has a grave choice to make— will he join the Showman and accept the horror? Featuring remastered Michael Zulli art by David Curiel at InLight Studios! Also, the collection contains complete scripts to all three issues, Neil Gaiman’s original correspondence with Alice Cooper, and Neil Gaiman’s original outline.

LastTemptHC-Cov-168pgs

Preview: Costume Quest: Invasion of the Candy Snatchers

COSTUME QUEST: INVASION OF THE CANDY SNATCHERS

By: Zac Gorman

Hot on the heels of the freshly announced video game Costume Quest 2, Oni Press presents an adorable Halloween-themed graphic novel from Double Fine Productions (Broken Age, Psychonauts) and comics superstar Zac Gorman (Magical Game Time)! Klem and his pals aren’t the most popular Grubbins in candy-starved Repugia, but Klem’s hoping that will change once he brings a hoard of candy back from the human world. After all, it’s Halloween, so there’s candy everywhere! Unfortunately, there’re also bullies everywhere, ready to steal all of Klem’s sweet, sweet loot. Will he and his friends make it out alive, or are they doomed to an eternity of sugar-free torment?

COSTUME QUEST-01

Review: Ricky Rouse Has a Gun

Ricky Rouse has a Gun CoverRick Rouse is a US Army deserter who, after running away to China, gets a job at Fengxian Amusement Park, a family destination heavily “inspired” by Western culture, featuring Rambi (the deer with a red headband), Ratman (the caped crusader with a rat’s tail), Bumbo (small ears, big behind) and other original characters. The park’s general manager is convinced that Rick was destined to greet Fengxian customers dressed as none other than Ricky Rouse. But when American terrorists take the entire park hostage, only Ricky Rouse can save the day. In a furry costume.

Ricky Rouse Has a Gun is part action story, part parody, part commentary on intellectual property, and totally entertaining. What I found amazing about Ricky Rouse is its layered storytelling. You can read as much, or as little as you want. Is it an action story? Is it commentary about China’s habits when it comes to copyrights? Is it commentary about the United State’s creativity? Is it all of the above or more? This is a graphic novel that you can read, and debate about for hours after, and no answers would be incorrect. The foreward of the book is provided by Christopher Sprigman, a professor of law and New York University, and it sets the tone to get you to think of it all.

But beyond that depth, the characters are entertaining, moments are hillarious, and action worthy of the big screen. Ricky Rouse to me is an ode to action movies, and the sequels they spawn, with some great commentary thrown in there. Though it’s presented on printed page, I had many of the scenes playing through my head as if they were directed by Bruckheimer or Bay. For every thing that gets you to think, there’s also more than enough explosions to allow you to turn off your brain too.

Mix it all with some fantastic art, and the graphic novel is one that both entertains and gets you to think, and there’s enough in there about Chinese culture, you might learn a bit too.

Story: Jörg Tittel Art: John Aggs
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Self Made Hero provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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