Tag Archives: gender

Demo-Graphics: The State of “Gamers” 2015

It’s Monday and we’re looking at the latest Facebook Fandom breakdown. It’s been a year since I did a report about “gamers” in the lead up to Gen Con. So, welcome to the second annual State of Gamers.

This data is gained through mining Facebook and includes over 175 different terms from a variety of games, publishers, and more. The terms I used are varied, and many, from the name of games to the name of publishers and terms like collectible card game. For this I did my best to stay away from generic terms for genres (like Fantasy) and terms that specifically mentioned video games. I also avoided games like Monopoly or Scategories, I wanted to focus on the games you’d find at Gen Con.

We’ll compare this report to last year’s, but much has changed since then. Unlike the previous year, the technology platform to get the data has remained mostly unchanged, and the terms used also remain relatively the same (some have gone away, some are new).

Facebook Population: Over 31,000,000 in the United States

The amount of individuals who like these terms has increased from the previous year by 7 million.

Spanish speakers account for now 3.9 million fans, 12.58% in the United States. That’s an increase of 1.3 million since last year.

Gender and Age

In 2014 Men dominated as the majority with 55% compared to women at 44.17%. A year later and things have changed. Men now account for just 51.61% and women are 48.39%.

gamers facebook gender 7.27.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

gamers facebook gender age 7.27.15

Compared to last year, the graph above is very similar though the gap between men and women is less. What I do find interesting is that women really start to gain in population in the 26-29 segment, and the majority at 38-41. It would seem that women may come into board games later in life.

gamers facebook gender age raw 7.27.15

Relationship Status

The real shift from last year is that a greater percentage are married or unspecified compared to last year.

gamers facebook relationship status 7.27.15

And for those that like pie charts.gamers facebook relationship status pie chart 7.27.15

 

Education

The education stats haven’t shifted much since last year, even with the surge of new folks.

gamers facebook education 7.27.15

Gender Interest

Those interested in the same gender has decreased percentage wise since last year, but the population has increased.

gamers facebook gender interest 7.27.15

Ethnicity

This is a new data that wasn’t available last year. Below the data is presented without comparison due to that. I can say that the data is interesting compared to the general United States population. Both the African American and Asian American population are a smaller percentage compared to the general US population, but the Hispanic population is much greater.

gamers facebook ethnicity 7.27.15

Generation

Below are the stats of groups based off of their generation, another new statistic.

gamers facebook generation 7.27.15

And that wraps up our look at who the gamers are in the United States!

We’ll be returning with a new demographic break down of comic book fans this Saturday August 1!

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

With San Diego Comic-Con going on, we’re looking at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

Facebook Population: Over 47,000,000 in the United States

The total population increased by 10 million, bringing the total to over 47 million individuals. It is currently unknown where this increase came from, and we’ll be exploring some possibilities in our San Diego Comic-Con focused post. The current theory I have is that there is a summer boom, followed by a bust later in the year. There is also the possibility of a general increase in the male Facebook population. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 13.78%, and this month is 13.19%. That decrease in percentage is due to the fact the population did not increase to keep pace with the boom this month.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 43.24% and men were 56.76%. The 10 million increase this month was mostly in the male segment which saw an increase of 7 million individuals. Women increased only 3 million. Now, men account for 59.57% of the population, while women are up to 40.43%. We’ll have further reporting on the decrease of the female segment in our SDCC report next week.

facebook gender 7.1.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

facebook gender age 7.1.15

Compared to last month, those 29 and under saw vasts increases in the millions. Those older did see an increase as well, but nearly the growth in volume of the Millennial segments.

facebook gender age raw 7.1.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last month, most segments saw increases other than women who were engaged which remained stagnant.

facebook relationship 7.1.15

And for those that like pie charts.

facebook relationship pie chart 7.1.15

Education

Things haven’t changed that much compared to last month just some shifts as to percents due to growth.

facebook education 7.1.15

Gender Interest

Generally there stats remained very steady, even with the massive growth.

facebook relationship interest 7.1.15

Ethnicity

We saw increases across for African Americans and Asians, but Hispanics decreased. Percentages though were mixed. African Americans increased by 1,100,000 individuals, but the percent dropped by 0.13%. Asian Americans increased by 400,000, and saw their percentage increase by 1.21%. Hispanics decreased by 1.2 million, but those that are Spanish dominant as far as language increased by 300,000 people.

facebook ethnicity 7.1.15

Generation

We can see the increase across the board, but it’s Millennials who saw the largest increase as a percentage of the population and Generation X decreased.

facebook generation 7.1.15

And that wraps up this month’s report. But, next week we start diving into our San Diego Comic-Con special reporting! Come back every day for new data and insight!

Demo-Graphics: The State of Indie/Small Press Comics

Earlier this week I brought you demographic reports based off of Facebook data for Marvel, and DC. Up next is independent/small press comics! Basically, everyone not the “big two.”

For this report I looked at comic book publisher likes that are not the big two or part of the big two. For this report, Vertigo, Zuda, Icon, are not included though they share similar comics as to other in this report. For this report, terms like IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, Fantagraphics were included. Manga was left out of this as well. In 2014 49 terms were used to generate these stats. In 2015 that number has remained the same.

Facebook Population: Over 4,400,000 in the United States

The indie/small press population has grown since last year by about 1.2 million individuals. That’s the same amount it grew in the previous year.

In 2014 Spanish speakers accounted for 12.50%. In 2015, that percentage dipped a bit, and is also 12.5%.

Gender and Age

In 2014 men accounted for 57.50% of the population and women 40.63%. A year later, that has shifted a bit with men now accounting for 59.09% and women 40.91%.

Here’s the stats for gender.

Indie Facebook 7.8.15

This is how gender changes as far as percent over age.

Indie Facebook age gender 7.8.15

And the raw data. Unlike Marvel and DC, Indie/Small press has lost young women as far as percentage of the population.

Indie Facebook age gender raw 7.8.15

Relationship Status

A lot more people are engaged, compared to last year. Congrats everyone!

Indie Facebook relationship 7.8.15

And for those that like pie charts.

Indie facebook relationship pie chart 7.8.15

Education

There’s so slight shifts since last year.

Indie Facebook education 7.8.15

Gender Interest

These stats are similar to last year, unlike Marvel and DC which saw the percentage of those interested in the same sex decrease.

Indie Facebook gender interest 7.8.15

Ethnicity

For the first time we have these stats, so they’re presented here without comment.

Indie Facebook ethnicity 7.8.15

Generation

For the first time we have these stats, so they’re presented here without comment.

Indie Facebook generation 7.8.15

Join us tomorrow when we look at comicdom as a whole!

Demo-Graphics: The State of Marvel Comics

In July of 2014, I looked at the Facebook demographics of Marvel. With San Diego Comic-Con kicking off this week, we’re returning to see how things stand. Yesterday was DC Comics‘ stats, and tomorrow will be Indie/Small Press comics.

For those that don’t know, this data is mined from Facebook’s demographic data using terms that correspond to likes, groups, etc. For this report, we’re not looking at Marvel Comics specifically, but also Marvel Studio, Marvel Entertainment, and more. So think of this as the Marvel brand.

Facebook Marvel Comics Fan Population: Over 22,000,000 United States

That’s up from last year’s stats by about 10.6 million, most of which is men. Since last year, Spanish speakers have shrank as part of the population. In 2014, they were 14.39% and in 2015 it now accounts for 13.18%.

Gender and Age

In 2014 Men made up about 63.16% of the population and women were 36.84% for those interested in Marvel. In the past year, Marvel has made an effort to engage the female demographic, but gains over the past year has mainly been with men. Though both gained, men increased by about 10 million, and women were about 200,000. Men are 77.27% of the population with women accounting for 20%.

Marvel Facebook gender 7.7.15

Here’s how the gender plays out over age.

Marvel Facebook age and gender 7.7.15

Marvel made gains age 22 to 41 mostly. Women did make gains as a percentage for those age 17 and under.

Marvel Facebook age and gender raw 7.7.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last year engaged, married, and unspecified gained in percentages.

Marvel Facebook relationship 7.7.15

And for those who like their pie charts.

Marvel Facebook relationship pie chart 7.7.15

Education

As expected, with an older population higher degrees of college and up have increased when it comes to percentage.

Marvel Facebook education 7.7.15

Gender Interest

When it comes to those interested in the same sex, those percentages have dropped all around compared to last year.

Marvel Facebook gender interest 7.7.15

Ethnicity

These stats were not available last year, so are presented for the first time.

Marvel Facebook ethnicity 7.7.15

Generation

These stats were not available last year, so are presented for the first time.

Marvel Facebook generation 7.7.15

Join us again tomorrow when we’ll look at indie/small press comics!

Demo-Graphics: The State of DC Entertainment

With San Diego Comic-Con about to begin we’re looking at the demographic data for various publishers and comics. We’ve already posted Facebook‘s general stats, and tomorrow will be Marvel, followed by Indie comics, and the industry as a whole. Up now is DC Entertainment.

This statistic breakdown, we’ve looked at terms like DC Comics and Vertigo Comics, but not specific comic series or characters. It’s a focus on DC Entertainment and its publishing imprints. Think of it as looking at the DC brand.

Facebook DC Comics Fan Population: Over 12,000,000 US

Compared to 2014’s statistics, the DC population grew by about 7.6 million. So, over the year, DC has built up their social media presence in an impressive way, over doubling their presence on Facebook.

In 2014 Spanish speakers accounted for 14.55% of the population. In 2014, that amount dropped to 14.17%, not a huge difference considering the growth.

Gender and Age

In 2014, men accounted for 68.18% and women were 28.64% of the DC population. Flash forward about a year, and men now account for 73.33% and women are now 27.50%. That continues a greater gender divide compared to last year, and it has widened over the past two.

And here’s the stats in a handy pie-chart.

DC Facebook 7.7.15

And here’s how gender shapes up by percent over age. Compared to last years, it shows the widened gap.

DC Facebook gender age 7.7.15

Here’s the full raw numbers as far as age and gender. While the gap has widened overall, it’s not constant overall. Women age 21 and under have gained in percentage of the population. Age 17 and under women account for 43.33%, 10% points more than last year.

DC Facebook age and gender raw 7.7.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last year less folks are single, in a relationship, married, pretty much all stats other than complicated and unspecified when it comes to percent.

DC Facebook Relationship 7.7.15

And for those who like their data in pie chart form.

DC Facebook relationship pie chart 7.7.15

Education

Compared to last year, the education stats haven’t changed all that much.

DC Facebook Education 7.7.15

Gender Interest

Compared to last year, the percents of those interested in the same gender has decreased.

DC Facebook gender interest 7.7.15

Ethnicity

This is the first year for this data. As we have nothing to compare it to, I’ll just present it without comment, and save the analysis for later when I compare DC, Marvel, and Indie comics.

DC Facebook ethnicity 7.7.15

Generation

This stat too is new. Here it’s presented in it’s raw form, and we’ll compare it to Marvel and Indie comics later.

DC Facebook Generation 7.7.15

Come back tomorrow when we’ll look at stats for Marvel!

Demo-Graphics: Facebook US Users

With San Diego Comic-Con kicking off this week, I’ll be looking at a whole bunch of data crunched from mining Facebook. To kick this off, I thought it’d be good to look at how Facebook itself might have changed. It’s been over a year since I last looked at the data, and much has changed, including some of the process itself and what is returned as far as data.

We’ll also be using this data to see how things might impact the comic fan population, and how comic fans compare to the general Facebook population.

Unlike my other reports, this one focuses just on people who are on Facebook and located in the United States. No terms are used at all as far as likes, interests, etc.

Facebook Population: Over 191,000,000 in the United States

Since January of 2014, the population of Facebook users has increased by 11 million individuals. Of that, Spanish speakers now account for 9.95% with 19 million of them. In 2014 that population was 16.4 million or 9.11%.

Gender and Age

In 2014, men accounted for 45.56% and women were 53.33%. Interestingly is both populations have grown not just in overall size, but also percentages. Women now account for 53.40% while men are 46.07%. The difference is a shrinking population not marking either. In the United States as a whole, women account for 51%, while men are about 49%, that was as of the 2010 Census. So, Facebook skewers slightly more female.

Facebook Gender 7.6.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age. Unlike comic fans, there’s never a point where men are a clear majority. At most there’s parity from ages 22 to 29.

Facebook gender age 7.6.15

And here is all of the data presented in its raw form. Compared to 2014, what we see is interesting though. Under 17 has shrunk as far as population, and so has those 54 and up. The growth is really centered on those age 26 to 53.

Facebook gender age raw 7.6.15

Relationship Status

This is completely different than last year due to the increased amount of choices.

Facebook relationship status 7.6.15

And for those that like pie charts.

Facebook relationship status pie chart 7.6.15

Education

This too has changed a lot since last year. There’s now many more choices for individuals to choose.

Facebook education 7.6.15

Gender Interest

Things her too have changed as far as data available. Last year 5.63% were interested in the same-sex. Now, it’s 2.24%.

Facebook gender interest 7.6.15

Ethnicity

This is the first time we have ethnicity for Facebook. The below is presented without comment.

Facebook ethnicity 7.6.15

Generation

And finally, we also data on generations, another brand new stat. Below again, without comment, here’s the stats.

Facebook generation 7.6.15

Join us tomorrow when we start to dive into specific stats, up first DC Entertainment!

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

Facebook Population: Over 47,000,000 in the United States

The total population increased by 10 million, bringing the total to over 47 million individuals. It is currently unknown where this increase came from, and we’ll be exploring some possibilities in our San Diego Comic-Con focused post. The current theory I have is that there is a summer boom, followed by a bust later in the year. There is also the possibility of a general increase in the male Facebook population. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 13.78%, and this month is 13.19%. That decrease in percentage is due to the fact the population did not increase to keep pace with the boom this month.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 43.24% and men were 56.76%. The 10 million increase this month was mostly in the male segment which saw an increase of 7 million individuals. Women increased only 3 million. Now, men account for 59.57% of the population, while women are up to 40.43%. We’ll have further reporting on the decrease of the female segment in our SDCC report next week.

facebook gender 7.1.15

We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

facebook gender age 7.1.15

Compared to last month, those 29 and under saw vasts increases in the millions. Those older did see an increase as well, but nearly the growth in volume of the Millennial segments.

facebook gender age raw 7.1.15

Relationship Status

Compared to last month, most segments saw increases other than women who were engaged which remained stagnant.

facebook relationship 7.1.15

And for those that like pie charts.

facebook relationship pie chart 7.1.15

Education

Things haven’t changed that much compared to last month just some shifts as to percents due to growth.

facebook education 7.1.15

Gender Interest

Generally there stats remained very steady, even with the massive growth.

facebook relationship interest 7.1.15

Ethnicity

We saw increases across for African Americans and Asians, but Hispanics decreased. Percentages though were mixed. African Americans increased by 1,100,000 individuals, but the percent dropped by 0.13%. Asian Americans increased by 400,000, and saw their percentage increase by 1.21%. Hispanics decreased by 1.2 million, but those that are Spanish dominant as far as language increased by 300,000 people.

facebook ethnicity 7.1.15

Generation

We can see the increase across the board, but it’s Millennials who saw the largest increase as a percentage of the population and Generation X decreased.

facebook generation 7.1.15

And that wraps up this month’s report. But, next week we start diving into our San Diego Comic-Con special reporting! Come back every day for new data and insight!

The Most Exciting thing about Disney’s Playmations Might be the Stock Photos

Yesterday, Disney announced their next toy breakthrough, Playmation, tech infused toys and playsets that’ll feature themes of Marvel characters, Disney characters, Frozen, Star Wars, and more.

The “next step in play” seems like something we’ve seen before, playsets, and other items, infused with tech, that also allows active play. That part isn’t new, it can be traced back to the home laser tag games, and absolutely earlier. The exact details of what this all means hasn’t quite been revealed, but it looks interesting, and potentially it should be fun.

What really stood out to me wasn’t the announcement itself, but the stock photos that were released by Disney’s partner in this Hasbro. The photos featured three children playing with the Avengers set release which is first up. What’s new is that one of the three children was a girl. In fact, 5 of the 9 photos that were part of Hasbro’s press release feature the young girl. And look, there’s also a Black Widow figure coming out too!

Is this Disney, and Hasbro, finally admitting that girls also like toys based on super heroes?

Disney, Marvel, and Hasbro have all come under fire for acting as if women aren’t interested in toys based on super heroes. Black Widow was absent from the Avengers: Age of Ultron toys, with her motorcycle scene set replacing her with Captain America, though she has been including in other sets including the Marvel Legends line of toys and Marvel Infinite series of toys. There’s also been outrage over a lack of some clothing options for women as well, and the absence of Black Widow on much of the boys clothes as well.

It’s possible this may be the strange continuation of featuring girls and female characters in sets not based on movies, or, this may be Disney and Hasbro acknowledging that girls due enjoy toys based on super heroes. It’s not just boys who act out being Iron Man, Spider-Man, and more, girls due it too, and those toys make it easier for them to do so.

You can see the photos below.

Demo-Graphics: Comic Fandom on Facebook

It’s the first of the month and that means a new look at the demographics of people who “like” comics on Facebook. This data is compiled using demographic data from Facebook, and is limited to the United States.

This data is compiled using key terms, “likes,” users have as part of their profiles. Primarily terms are focused on generic ones such as “comics” or “graphic novels” or publishers. I stay away from specific characters, creators or series, because this does not indicate they are a comic book fan. Over 100 terms are used for this report.

Facebook Population: Over 37,000,000 in the United States

The total population increased by 1 million, bringing the total to over 37 million individuals. The Spanish-speaking population last month was 14.17%, and this month is 13.78%. That decrease in percentage is due to the fact the population did not increase with the larger population.

Gender and Age

Last month women accounted for 41.67% and men were 58.33%. The million increase this month was all in the female segment, which increased 1 million from last month. Now, men account for 56.76% of the population, while women are up to 43.24%.

gender 6.1.15We’ll next look at how the percentage of women and men break down through age.

gender age 6.1.15Compared to last month, those 21 and under decreased in percentage and population. The population growth was for everyone over the age of 21.

gender age raw 6.1.15Relationship Status

Compared to last month, the results are almost exactly the same, those married increased a decent amount as well as those who didn’t specify their relationship status.

relationship 6.1.15And for those that like pie charts.

relationship pie chart 6.1.15Education

Things haven’t changed that much compared to last month when it comes to gender. I’d expect to see some shifts over the next few months as school lets out and kids begin a new year.

education 6.1.15Gender Interest

This month the “unspecified” category saw a sharp increase, especially for women and not quite as much for men.

gender interest 6.1.15Ethnicity

We saw increases across the board for all ethnicities. African Americans increased by 600,000 individuals. Asian Americans increased by 40,000. Hispanics increased 1.6 million.

ethnicity 6.1.15Generation

We can see here the shifts in the age from above. Baby Boomers and Generation X increased, and and Millennials decreased.

generation 6.1.15And that wraps up this month’s report.

Denver ComicCon, and That One Panel.

DENVER-CON_LOGOLast weekend, Denver ComicCon descended upon the Mile-High City. It wasn’t the latest announcements from publishers that made the news coming out of it, but one panel which cast a cloud upon the convention as a whole. As first reported on Twitter, the convention featured a Women in Comics panel, one of over eight focused just on women in comics and entertainment. Normally this wouldn’t be news, but this panel featured only men, and also some rather baffling statements such as “girls get bored with comics easily.”

Here’s the panel description:

With the female interest in comics increasing lately, this panel discusses many of the popular female characters from the beginning of the superhero mid 1930s comics. Also a focus on some of the women that were able to break in the mostly all male club of creating comics during that time. Includes an introduction to many of the female illustrators/creators attending the convention.

Panelists included Kevin Robinette, an Instructor on the History of American Comics at the Academy Art University of San Francisco, Craig Glassen, an Art Instructor for Denver area schools, and Jason H. Tucker, who is involved with The Way Interactive graphic novel app. Some took three men presenting the topic of “women in comics” as an extension of the general exclusion of women in comic geekdom. And critics are right, at least one woman should have been on the panel. But even the inclusion of a woman doesn’t guarantee that there won’t be idiotic marginalizing/sexist/problematic statements. That’s upon the panelists themselves. I haven’t heard audio, so don’t know how, or why, “girls get bored with comics easily” would have been said. At face value, it’s an idiotic statement, and one that has no place in an academic discussion.

When asked why there were no women on the panel, the panelists reportedly said it “was a last-minute addition and didn’t know any.” Influential comic artist and writer Trina Robbins was in attendance at the convention, and could have easily been a fantastic last-minute addition to the panel, if the panel organizers had reached out.

It should be noted that this black eye isn’t indicative of the convention as a whole. I went through the entire guidebook, counting the number of men and women listed on panels. Not every panel had the panelists listed, but of the 301 that did, the 1,033 people listed were roughly 54.70% men and 45.30% women. That’s not scientific, I Googled only a few folks to figure out their gender, not all 1,033 of them. Some panels were all men, some panels were all women, and many were balanced with men and women equally. There was even a panel called “NASA: Science, Is It Just a Man’s Game?” where “male and female NASA scientists discuss the perceived gender bias in science careers.” So, it wasn’t a systemic thing at the convention.

So, the question remains, “why did this happen?”

While a rather poor statement was released to ComicsAlliance by DStreet PR, we haven’t really heard from the convention itself…. until now. The Director of the Denver ComicCon, Christina Angel, responded to a discussion that occurred on a comics listserv. With permission, her response is posted below.

Hi Brett and others on this thread. I will jump in here and address some of this (I am the Director for DCC). As a woman in charge of a large convention, I empathize with and understand what people are upset about with this panel. I am not making any excuses for this panel, BUT (sorry for that – I will explain momentarily) it is absolutely NOT indicative of who we are or what we we stand for. While I do hear what people are saying and find most of it difficult to argue with, it would be a shame to see this as representative rather than what it was.

It was a total screwup on our part, and a larger screwup on the part of the panelists themselves. As a late add to the programming schedule, these panelists have been with us before and we know them, so it seemed a safe bet to approve the panel and allow the moderator to fill the slots on the panel (as is often the case at conferences and conventions). We had no idea they would take the stance they did, nor would express such outdated and uninformed views. We were all surprised by this. But none of that excuses it, the fault falls to us and we are deeply sorry.

We have a diversity mission and our programming department works themselves half to death (as volunteers) to promote inclusivity and representation. I hope that anyone doubting this will take a look at the rest of the 400 panels we presented to see this. Once the word was out about this controversial disaster of a panel, Crystal Skillman quickly pulled together some other female guests to have a panel in response to this and we made it happen and publicized it. I would be happy to direct anyone to the link of the recording of it.

But the short version is: we are sorry, we don’t stand by this panel and will be far more diligent in the future to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Please feel free to write to me privately if you have additional queries or would like to discuss this further.

All the best,
Chris

The convention itself (forget the flack PR company’s response) realized the panel was a disaster. The fact is, it wasn’t representative of the convention as a whole, especially when you look at the rest of their panel line-up.

So, how is this prevented in the future?

It’s clear no matter the history of panelists with a convention, the completed panel including all panelists, should be presented to a convention before approval. It is imperative upon the convention organizers to make sure there’s no issues with those panels before approving them. Past relationships aren’t good enough. In this case, it was really that simple a fix that could have prevented this.

Denver ComicCon realized their mistake, and attempted to make good with securing resources and a room for the addition of a much better and more appropriate panel featuring some of the convention’s female guests that was organized partially in response to what happened. Credit where credit is due, I can’t think of a convention reacting to a disastrous panel so quickly, and in a very smart way.

I’ve been a critic of Denver ComicCon in the past, and have watched them like a hawk since, but it’s clear that 0.25% of their panels doesn’t reflect the convention as a whole. There’s absolutely a need to call out mistakes like this, but we should learn from those mistakes, how did they happen, why was it wrong, and prevent them from being repeated in the future.

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