Tag Archives: flash

Review: Flash #45

Flash45Zoom’s plan to destroy the image of the Flash before killing him continues. A large portion of Central City is trapped beneath a dome of the Flash’s own energy and it is up to him to find a way to get everyone out alive.

The story again builds on Zoom’s plan to kill the Flash by destroying his reputation. By having the Flash be the power source for the dome, he hopes that he can turn the city against him. It works too. Captain Frye of the police force instantly sees him as an enemy. But, it does not make much sense. The entire story is full of leaps of logic that take away from the narrative. The captain blames the Flash for the dome, even though, he witnessed the Flash trigger a trap that was plainly set for him by the villains. Even after saving people, the Captain still believes he cannot be trusted for no sound reason. The twist ending also leads to a leap of logic which makes the entire story before it pointless. The final reveal could have happened the exact same way without the dome ever being a part of Zoom’s master plan. On the more positive side, Wally West’s growth as a heroic figure continues to be the most interesting part of this comic. As all of the adults around him continue to lose their cool, he is the only one able to stay calm and find a solution to their predicament.

The artwork is strong throughout. The dome creates a background of scarlet and lightning which adds a layer of tension and movement to almost every panel. Facial expressions are well portrayed and match very well the large scope of feelings being presented by the characters. The panel layouts are also visually striking and add a sense of chaos to the rapid movements of the Flash and Zoom.

Overall, The Flash #45 is a letdown that does not build on the story of the last few issues. The ending panel makes the entire Zoom arc so far irrelevant and over complicated. What could have been a fun action survival story turns into a waste of time as the narrative shift makes the entire affair seem pointless.

Story: Van Jensen Art: Brett Booth, Vicente Cifuentes, Ale Garza
Story: 6 Art: 7.5 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Pass

Review: The Flash #44

Flassh44Professor Zoom continues his plan to destroy the image of The Flash so completely, that when he finally does kill him, no one will remember his name and the great evil Zoom believes he will become will be erased from history. Barry is now forced to do everything in his power to save his father as Zoom’s grip on his life continues to tighten.

A large part of the Flash’s identity is based on the idea of family and this arc in no different. While Henry Allen sits a captive of Zoom, Barry rushes to save the father he never truly knew, in the hope of recreating the family he never truly had. At the same time, Barry finds himself trying to create another family where he is a father figure to a young Wally West, hoping to help him avoid the trauma he experienced growing up without a father. This is the heart of the issue and it is done very well. There is a sense of love between these three characters, making every move by Zoom and his allies to crush the Flash feel even more impactful. Ironically enough though, the most mature out of the three is Wally West, as he must be leveled headed to help Barry from being too irrational about how to save his father.

Although, the issue does falter in terms of the execution of Zoom’s plan. The story essentially boils down to framing the Flash for an unforgivable crime but, they attempt to do this by incriminating him in broad daylight with the entire city watching. It is hard to believe all of Central City would fail to notice that the villains are not the cause of everything when they are screaming in the middle of downtown.

The art is also a mixed bag of quality. This all stems from the design choice to make every single panel angled as if the page is shattered glass. It works very well during the action scenes when the Flash is moving. The style creates a great sense of chaotic motion which is what one would expect when moving as quickly as the fastest man alive. The problem is, these same angled panels do not work in the slower, more conversation driven scenes. They lead to a lot of wasted blank space on the page and, many times, do not fit the mood of the scene occurring on them.

Overall, this is a fine buildup issue that has enough interesting parts to make the coming finale a worthwhile read.

Story: Robert Venditti, Van Jensen Art: Brett Booth
Story: 7 Art: 7 Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

Sunday Roundtable: DC Comics, Should it Be One Cinematic Universe?

JLA Roundtabledc movie and tvWelcome back for our second Sunday Roundtable where the Graphic Policy team take on a topic and discuss it throughout the week. On tap?

Though we’ve only had hints so far, DC Comics has split their television and movie universes (there’s two Flash for example). Should it have all been integrated? Discuss!

Monique: I would have preferred it if everything was integrated as it would feel a lot more real. It’s nice when things are connected and fun when audiences can spot things that link the DC universe together. However it’s nice to have a TV show to look forward to every week.

Alex: I think in many ways splitting them up gives each show more creative freedom (but if rumours are true, then Arrow had to drop Deadshot because of the Suicide Squad movie – not 100% sure on that, though).

batman v s uperman dawn of justiceMr. H: I like it split. We all know Batman V Superman is going to be epic, but I like the feel of shows like Arrow and Flash which have done beyond what I’ve ever expected. DC owns the small screen for sure! I am looking forward to Legends of Tomorrow and Supergirl as well. It like in wrestling, you have the main eventers and the mid carders. The tv shows are the midcarders and let you appreciate it more because they work harder. Personally I want an Aquaman show. It’s well over due and the time is right. I hope they don’t integrate because they give us different flavors. Like on a tv show we might get underutilized characters like Ralph Dibney. Where we wouldn’t on a movie. For everyone that likes chocolate chip. There’s always someone that likes Butter Pecan. Good quote (Identity Crisis)

Brett: But is it really split? DC is all about the multiverse. There’s no reason we can’t see some giant Crisis film and the multiple same characters come together. I actually think DC has an advantage over Marvel due to that.

Alex: You know what? I had never thought of that until you mentioned it, Brett. That being said, will it actually happen? It’d be awesome if it did, but I suspect we are at least five to ten years away from that possibility.

Monique: That is a very interesting point, never thought of it like that Brett.

Alex wouldn’t it be relative to their budget though? If we’re talking about Marvel, Samuel Jackson was in the movies Iron Man, Avengers, Captain America but made an appearance Agents of Shield.

arrowBrett: Yeah, it’s interesting that DC is dominating the small screen too with this strategy and it’s allowed them to do such diverse programming. Agents of Shield had been so hit and miss. It really just feels like I watch the season to get to the movie tie in. DC I watch because it’s good television that also has geeky easter eggs.

And adding to DC too is their web content. They launched the Vixen animated series which is set in the Arrow/Flash universe.

Monique: Yeah, I’ve been watching it, it’s fantastic. I agree, they’re definitely dominating in all aspects and I think they always have done really, in terms of shows movies and cartoons

Alex: I think that’s the advantage to Shield; because it has the movie tie ins, more people are willing to stick it out on the lows. DC’s TV shows have to be consistently good (which is only a good thing for fans).

Elana: The vixen launch was not adequately promoted. I didn’t find out it already started in fact! As for the division I just really resent them turning Green Arrow into Batman. Admittedly I never watch the show because it so obviously had nothing at all to do with the character that I actually love. But it’s just aargh.

Alex: I’m enjoying Arrow so far, but I also agree with you Elana. It feels far too Batman like at times (I know Green Arrow was at one time very imitative of Bats, but I’m pretty sure that was long ago). I’ve never read any Green Arrow, though, so I don’t really have much expectation of what he should be.

Brett: I also find it interesting that DC has really played with the tone of each television series, and wonder if we’ll see that carry over to the movies.

Alex: Do DC have a similar structure governing their television/cinematic output that Marvel had up until recently? I ask because I wonder whether the tonality has been a conscious choice of a group, or simply the creative freedom allowed by DC’s approach.

theflash_full_costumeBrett: As far as how it tv ties to movies? Nope. Everything stands on its own so far. There’s the Arrow/Flash/Vixen/Constantine universe, there’s the Man of Steel/upcoming movies, and there’s Supergirl and Lucifer (not counting iZombie). Each has their own tone/style even within their own grouping.

Shield‘s style mimics the films I think, and that seems to also hamper it a bunch. Agent Carter wasn’t vital to the film narrative and felt a bit free to me.

People give DC a lot of crap, but when it comes to TV they’re knocking out of the park (plus their animated stuff). And the movies are set up, it looks like, for similar freedom.

Alex: It’s true. Last year Constantine was one of the best shows on air before it was cancelled. And whilst I keep hearing great things about Gotham I stopped watching after the first four or five episodes. Why? Because it was competing for my time with Shield (yes, I know they air on different nights, but I DVR most things and watch them later), and Shield has the benefit of being part of the MCU.

If Fox can pull off an X-Men TV show, do you think it’ll be odd essentially having two Marvel TV universes or not?

Brett: No different than it is now, right? The big difference is DC controls all of its output (or parts of their parent company does), unlike Marvel.

Here’s something that’d fit the discussion, is there too much when it comes to television shows. We have to be near saturation in film, but how many shows is too many shows? If there even is such a thing.

Alex: Honestly, for me, we’re dangerously close to over saturation. My wife isn’t as big a comic fan as I am, and really only wants to watch a few shows (Flash, Arrow and maybe Heroes or Supergirl), which leaves me a lot to squeeze at other times; and obviously things fall by the wayside, and I end up not watching half of what I want to watch.

Do any of you have a list of shows you’re willing to drop s the season goes on?

Brett: I review them, hard to drop them! The one good thing is that some won’t be out in the Fall and will be out in the Winter, but there’s still about a half dozen this fall?

Melissa Benoist Supergirl 2Add on top of it, some are going head to head. It’s Gotham vs Supergirl Mondays!

Alex: Yeah, I suppose you’re slightly more obligated to watch them than I am, eh?

Brett: But, beyond splitting the DC universe, do they risk hurting the movies because people love the shows too much? Will people who like the Flash tv show brush off a Flash tv movie? I can’t figure out if folks will let each stand on their own. Hints of reactions may be similar to reactions with the Batman and Spider-Man reboots.

Alex: I think the problem we’re closing in on isn’t that there’s simply not enough time in the day for most people to watch all the comic book TV shows and other TV shows. Laugh all you like, but next week there’s two programs starting up that I’m super excited for; the two hour Heroes Reborn premiere and, uh, Grey’s Anatomy. I’m sure that won’t be the only conflict.

Brett: I’ll admit I watch Grey‘s. I’ve dedicated all this time, I want to see how it ends. Yeah, I haven’t even thought of Heroes as a comic show, but it’s similar in subject.

Alex: To your last comment: I’m more willing to skip the Flash movie because of the TV show. Which I’m sure isn’t their intent at all.

At the end of the day, there is a lot of great TV happening this year, both comic book and not. I think there’s going to be some great shows cancelled that shouldn’t have been (like Constantine last year – I still am not over that).

Review: The Flash #40

theflash040That Convergence is coming is perhaps the most ironic for the Flash of all DC characters.  It was after all Flashpoint, the company wide crossover, that took the old DC into the new 52.  This crossover focused somewhat on Barry Allen and his attempt to stop the effects of the Reverse-Flash on destroying the continuity of the DC Universe, which had left millions dead and Earth without its true heroes.  The move left many series somewhat hanging as the abrupt cutoff forced some stories to be condensed and versions of characters to be erased.  It is now Convergence’s turn to exact this fate on this series, even if its effects are not as drastic.

This issue picks up where the story arc had left off.  Future Barry was on the verge of becoming a homicidal maniac by killing or maiming every villain that he had ever failed to catch, while present Barry was still stuck in the land of the Speed Force.  With the end coming, at least until June, it was time to wrap up this story and to move on, and this was done in this final issue before the break, only perhaps in an overly efficient way.  As with many stories condensed into such time frames, it feels as though the series would have done better with a couple more issues to deal with the heavier issues involved, but here they were disregarded in order to wrap up the plot.  The plot serves as a way to introduce a major villain as well as to reintroduce another, and even yet another that might be back at some point (though might simply be forgotten.)  In the process the two Flashes resolve their dispute in a spectacular way, and there is even some closure for present Barry.

If that seems like a bit much for one issue, its because it kind of is.  The series is not really well done by with this wrap-up, especially as this story arc started off with such an interesting concept, even if that concept was an abandonment of the focus put on science throughout the first three years of this series.  This is a wrap up but it leaves the character a bit too contained, with no stories to directly follow.  Two months of Convergence will dominate and it is likely that the Flash will figure in prominently, but for now this is left on a bit of a mediocre low.

Story: Robert Venditti and Van Jensen Art: Brett Booth
Story: 7.7 Art: 7.7 Overall: 7.7 Recommendation: Read

Review: The Flash #38

tf38covAlthough a popular enough character in his own right, the Flash never seems to get the big fireworks when it comes to attention surrounding the character.  There are never big relaunches of the character, bestselling authors are never brought in to give the character better recognition and marketing rarely focuses on the Scarlet Speedster. Some of this is duly earned, as the appeal of the character is just as much there as it is for some of the bigger names at DC, even if the Flash is able to hold down a monthly title quite consistently.  What this means is that many of the stories for the character tend to go unnoticed, with the present story arc being an obvious example.

There are two main stories going on in the story arc, as future Barry Allen has pushed the present Barry Allen into the speed force, expecting him never to return.  This leaves future Barry Allen in the present eager to undo all the mistakes that he knows happened in the future.  This is the more gripping side of the story, as the usual deontological outlook of most heroes is thrown aside as future Barry looks for the greatest good, even if that means a somewhat brutal version of cleaning up his own past.  The other half of the story has been somewhat stagnant, as the Flash that we know has been stuck in the Speed Force, a strange land populated by dinosaurs and robots.  While this has failed to grip as tightly, it picks up a lot of momentum here as it provides some background for the setting before the heroes head out into the thick of it. It ends up being a mix of something like the series Manifest Destiny but being explored by steampunk time travelers.  Although it is only touched on here, it has good potentially to match the other half of the story in the coming issues if handled correctly.

The series continues here to show that it should not be as disregarded as it on the company level, or even by the entire medium.  As the only speedster that can continuously hold down a monthly series, there has always been something special about the Flash, and while the science is often not that hard, there is at least something to it when philosophy is mixed with science.  This series deserves a look by anyone looking for something a little bit outside the box when it comes to their superheroes.

Story: Robert Venditti and Van Jensen Art: Brett Booth
Story: 8.6 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

DC Universe Online Lightning Strikes

Some new downloadable content has hit the Playstation 3 for DC Universe OnlineLightning Strikes is Flash centric adventures and you can check out the video below to see what you’d be getting.  The content will run you $9.99.

52 Reviews, Part 4

So, for the fun of it, I collected all 52 DC #1 issues. And I’m offering up my final reviews of the entire group. Keep in mind, though, that I’m generally a Marvel fan and, while I’m working may way through DC’s recent big events, I’m only up through the middle of Countdown and I haven’t read any of DC’s non-event comics in a long time, so I’m coming at these stories with a bit of a disadvantage in terms of chronology and character knowledge. Since DC is certainly trying to attract new readers, though, this makes me come at them with a perspective similar to their hypothetical new fans… Tomorrow or the next day, I’ll have a post on my overall thoughts on the whole reboot.

All Star Western #1 (DC) – I was prepared not to like this too much. I liked Jonah Hex as a kid, but I hadn’t read it since then. And I generally don’t like anything Western. Add to the mix that Hex wears a Confederate uniform and is anti-science and anti-urban and there’s no reason I should’ve liked this. And yet I loved it. Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti tell a very well-written tale that incorporates Western tropes, Jack the Ripper, Sherlock Holmes and the mythology of Gotham City. It all fits together very well, although a possible turn with the villains of the story could upset me if it goes the way it looks. I could probably do without another dead hooker story, but since it’s a Jack the Ripper homage, I’m okay with it in this case. It’s hard to argue that Moritat’s art isn’t perfect and while I don’t usually notice color artists in comics, Gabriel Bautista’s work is good enough here to get a shout out.

Story: 9.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.75

Aquaman #1 (DC) – Aquaman is a character I’ve never really liked. I bought all the jokes about how lame he and his powers were, so I never really paid much attention. Which played me right into Geoff Johns’ hands in this one. This is a funny comic book, maybe the funniest of the entire New 52. It makes fun of all of those jokes and doesn’t take itself too seriously. It also puts all of those jokes to rest and shows us that Aquaman isn’t the joke we think he is, he’s much more powerful than that. This issue also sets a new paradigm for the character and is a great way to re-introduce him to the world.

Story: 10 Art: 8 Overall: 9

Batman: The Dark Knight #1 (DC) – Hands down the Batman books are the backbone of the New 52. Every one of this is good to great and they give us a lot to look forward to. This is the worst of the bunch, but it is still readable, entertaining and looks good.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Blackhawks #1 (DC) – My deceased father was a childhood fan of Blackhawks and he always talked about them, even into his 60s. They weren’t really ever around much in my comic reading days, so I was interested in giving this one a shot as a way to connect with my dad’s comic book tastes. I think he would’ve liked this one and I thank the creators for giving me that connection to my father once again.

Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.75

The Fury of Firestorm: The Nuclear Men #1 (DC) – Another character I haven’t read much of since my childhood is Firestorm. The way the character(s) work here is quite a bit different, so far, than what I remember. The issue is pretty good and Ethan Van Sciver and Gail Simone do some pretty strong writing in terms of tackling stereotypes and race. I will say the ending to the issue left me a bit confused, but hopefully that will be cleared up next month.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.25

The Flash #1 (DC) – This one was a bit of a spoiler for me, since I’ve only read major DC events up to Countdown. I had no idea Barry Allen was back. This is a pretty nice story with a good mystery and a pretty awesome last page. Brian Buccellato’s art is quite good, too.

Story: 8 Art: 9 Overall: 8.5

Green Lantern: New Guardians #1 (DC) – The Green Lantern comics have also been pretty strong across the board and this one adds to that. The story here is quite interesting and leaves with a pretty good cliffhanger that will definitely have me back next issue.

Story: 8 Art: 7 Overall: 7.5

I, Vampire #1 (DC) – Wow. That’s really the best word to describe this, which I think is the best issue of the entire New 52. And I generally hate vampire tales. But this one is so well-written and so beautiful that I am now officially hooked on this series. The plot has such a great apocalyptic feel to it that I find myself wondering if the old I, Vampire tales were quite this good. I don’t remember them ever getting to this level.

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Justice League Dark #1 (DC) – Magic tales are not usually my cup of tea, but DC seems to have been getting them right in recent years and this is no exception. Unlike most of the new issues, this one really is the start of something new and it is a good beginning that really makes me want more. There are some amazing visuals in this book, particularly the June Moone splash. Some of the dialog and text is superbly written as well, such as the line: “The reek of skinned babies and sliced eyeballs.” Man, is that creepy or what? There’s more where that came from.

Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9

The Savage Hawkman #1 (DC) – No question this is the weakest book of the week. For one, I’ve never really been a huge Hawkman fan, but this issue is confusing, makes no sense at times (Hawkman starts off by shooting his old costume) and doesn’t look very good at times. It’s not terrible, but with all the other great comics DC put out this week, this one pales in comparison.

Story: 6 Art: 6.5 Overall: 6.25

Superman #1 (DC) – George Perez re-introduces Superman here with a tale told in a throwback style with lots of third-person narration, a nostalgic tale of Metropolis’s history and a strong introduction to the themes and supporting characters in the series. Oh, and there’s some kind of epic battle with a fire-monster alien, too.

Story: 9 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.75

Teen Titans #1 (DC) – Another tale launching a new team with introductions to some of the team members, this one is entertaining and has a lot of potential. Scott Lobdell does much better here than on Red Hood, so much so it’s hard to believe this is the same writer as that crap. Red Hood looks even worse now that we see that Lobdell can write a strong female character (in this case Wonder Girl).

Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8

Voodoo #1 (DC) – This issue conflicted me the most this week. After two weeks with controversies over female characters and their depictions as weak or nearly naked, it was disappointing to open this issue and see a half-naked stripper jump out at me. And then to see page after page of half-naked strippers for the entire issue. But Ron Marz shows that he isn’t writing as simplistically as you might expect. The opening page, as Brett pointed out to me, says “Are you ready gentlemen? Because this is why you’re here!” as if the near-nudity is meant as a tongue-in-cheek (no pun intended) thing and a slap at the fans who buy books for that purpose. But I kind of got the same feeling from this as I got from a story on Fox News where they condemn pornography while showing a clip from a porn movie. Marz does make sure to show us that the female characters in the issue are, at a minimum, intellectually, physically and even morally superior to the male characters (except for maybe the end of the issue where moral superiority drops off). This is definitely a comic where the female characters are the only characters that matter, but I wonder if that same point couldn’t have been made by having Voodoo work as a waitress instead of a stripper, since that would’ve fit the logic of the story just as well.

Story: 7 Art: 8 Overall: 7.5

Around the Tubes

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It’s Friday, Friday… and the reviews for this week’s comics are pouring out of other websites.  Check out what they had to say as well as the other news you might have missed.

Around the Blogs:

Arts Beat – For One Last Weekend, a Chance to See ‘Spider-Man’ 1.0Might be your last chance to see someone get injured.

Bleeding Cool – Movie Version Of Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns In The WorksPlease, please, please let this not be untrue.

Con Coverage:

Comic Book Resources – Long Beach Comics Expo Announces Programming

Comic Book Resources – WC11: Friday Photo Parade

IGN – Kapow! ’11: Comic History Rewritten On The IGN Stage

Around the Tubes Reviews:

IGN – The Amazing Spider-Man #658

IGN –Batgirl #20

IGN – Batman and Robin #22

IGN – Black Panther: The Man Without Fear #517

IGN – Butcher Baker, the Righteous Maker #2

IGN – Cinderella: Fables Are Forever #3

ICv2 – The Comics: The Complete Collection HC

IGN – Deadpool #35

Comic Book Resources – The Flash #10

IGN – The Flash #10

IGN – Fraggle Rock #3

IGN – Hawkeye: Blindspot #3

IGN – The Incredible Hulks #626

IGN – inFamous #3

IGN – The Infinite Vacation #2

IGN – Iron Man 2.0 #3

IGN – Journey Into Mystery #622

IGN – Justice League: Generation Lost #23

IGN – The New Avengers #11

IGN – Secret Warriors #26

IGN – S.H.I.E.L.D.: Infinity #1

IGN – Starborn #5

IGN – Steve Rogers: Super-Soldier Annual #1

IGN – Superboy #6

IGN – Superman #710

IGN – T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents #6

IGN – Ultimate Comics Avengers vs. New Ultimates #3

IGN – Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #157

IGN – Uncanny X-Force #7

IGN – Uncanny X-Men #535

IGN – X-Men Legacy #247

Comics Alliance – Digital Comics Weekly: Five Comics You Should Be Downloading

Comic Book Resources – The Buy Pile

IGN – Comic Book Reviews for 4/13/11

Around the Tubes

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It was new comic day yesterday, so that means a lot of reviews.  There was a kick up of news as well.  Catch everything you might have missed below.

Around the Blogs:

Library Journal – ACRL 2011: Laying the Foundation for a Graphic Novel Collection in an Academic LibraryIt’s a popular topic for librarians.

ICv2 – Michael Clarke Duncan to Voice Kilowog?I can hear the voice matching the character.  It could work.

Robot 6 – Warner Bros. dealt a setback in Superman legal battleIn the ongoing legal battle to the rights of Superman, a judge decides Warner Bros. doesn’t get to see a document.

Kotaku – Infamous, The Dark Phoenix Saga And A Guy Named SpencerKotaku looks at this week’s comics as well as a few that may be of interest to video game fans.

Con Coverage:

Solano Tempest – Geeks rejoice at WonderCon’s 25th anniversary

Bleeding Cool – VIDEO: Kapow’s Guinness Book Of World Records Attempt

Around the Tubes Reviews:

Comic Book Resources – Butcher Baker, The Righteous Maker #2

Good Comic Books – Journey Into Mystery #622

Bleeding Cool – Journey Into Mystery #622 and Flash #10

Bleeding Cool – Ultimate Comics Avengers Vs New Ultimates #3 and Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #157

Seattle PI – Western Classics

Complex – The Best Comics This Week: Thor, Hellboy, Hulk, and More!

Comicvine – Comic Book Reviews For The Week of 4/13/11

Pick of the Week – Secret Warriors #26

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It’s a new week of comics and there’s a lot of thinking as far as what the pick of the week should be.  This week the honor goes to Secret Warriors #26Jonathan Hickman‘s run has been a slow epic and I have no idea what to expect as it wraps up.  It looks like there’s some ties to S.H.I.E.L.D. and I’m sure there’ll be some long running repercussions knowing Hickman’s writing.

  1. Secret Warriors #26 – See above.
  2. Flash #10 – Flashpoint is coming and it’s clear it all starts with this series.  I’ve been really digging it, it’s the first DC series I’m absolutely sucked into.
  3. “X” Books – Uncanny X-Force, Uncanny X-Men and X-Men: Legacy are all out this week and each are on a resurgence of late.  With Schism coming, 2011 is looking like a banner year for the “X” line.
  4. Iron Man 2.0 #3 – War Machine is back and has a feel to make it stand out from the regular Iron Man series.
  5. Battle Chasers Anthology – It’s expensive, but if you have a bit of nostalgia, it’s worth it.  I’ve read it and am a bit saddened the series remains unfinished, but this brought back some great memories.