Tag Archives: captain america

What Could Be Expected in Phase 4 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

After its initial success with Iron Man, the Hulk, Captain America and Thor, Marvel Studios quickly realized that it had a formula for success on its hands and seemed ready to take advantage of it.  To do so though required a plan, and studio head Kevin Feige soon had broken down the movies into various phases, with the most recent Ant-Man signaling the end of phase 2.  Aside from the developments inside the movies, there have been some developments outside the movies which have affected the universe as well, chief among those the partial reversion of the rights to Spider-Man back to Marvel, or at least the use of Spider-Man inside the shared universe in a collaboration with Sony.

At the moment, we kn ow the entire lineup for phase 3, starting with Captain America: Civil War and continuing through two new Avengers movies and the Inhumans.  What might be expected in the next phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe?  The release of the newest Fantastic Four might signal some of the changes which we can anticipate ahead (there are some spoilers below).

Ant-Man and Wasp

waspMany expected Ant-Man to be one of the bigger disappointments thus far in the MCU, due to its ongoing problems with the direction, after it passed from Edgar Wright to Peyton Reed.  It seemed as though the studio was not going to take any risks with the character as they could not even confirm his role in any future movies.  This presumably will all change now that the movie has been released.  Although it can’t compare to the financial success of the year’s other Marvel movie, Avengers: Age of Ultron, it also is noteworthy as being a better critical success, with a better rating at Rotten Tomatoes than Avengers.  With both financial and critical success it seems as though there will be more to come from these characters.  As was hinted at the end of the movie, there is still a lot of story left to tell as well, as the end hinted that Janet van Dyne might not be truly lost.  Furthermore Hope van Dyne was presented with a Wasp suit by her father.  There could be a lot of places to take the story of the two heroes, though one in particular might make the most sense …

Micronauts

micronautsThe Micronauts are a bit of an oddity in comics.  They started out as a line of toys, who were written into comics after in the 1970s after Marvel writer Bill Mantlo saw his son open a box of the toys.  The series started as somewhat of a standalone, but slowly was incorporated into the Marvel Universe, with appearances by some other mainstream characters.  While the rights for the characters do not presently rest with Marvel, there is a long publication history with the characters and as the rights rest with other smaller comic companies, it would likely not be too difficult to reacquire the rights.  Furthermore for the film studio that might try to replicate the runaway success of Guardians of the Galaxy, they might look smaller instead of bigger and find their next surprise hit there.  There would be some hurdles, but also there might be a few benefits, as Janet van Dyne disappeared into the smallest dimension, the Microverse.  This small universe is not in itself small, but the pathways to enter it are, and could give an explanation as to where the character disappeared.  They might find Janet in the Microverse, but they might also be able to find some other heroes there as well…

Fantastic Four

fantastic fourThe Fantastic Four is one of the best known Marvel properties that does not lie within the company’s grasp at the moment, instead being controlled by Fox.  While Fox has managed to control the X-Men franchise strongly enough with some decent movies, the Fantastic Four has mostly been a sequence of failures.  The first of the series was good enough to warrant a sequel, but this was before the wake of Marvel movies changed how fans expected superhero movies to turn out.  Marvel Studios was looking to be innovative, not just rehash generic action/sci-fi plots with superheroes thrown in.  The most recent attempt by Fox to revamp the Fantastic Four might have been an attempt to do the same, to get some new excitement into the mix, but it evidently did not turn out that way.  Critical response (and probably financial) will mean that the characters will have to be shelved for a while before the public has forgotten enough about them.  Using the Sony/Spider-Man approach, lending the characters back to Marvel Studios might be a wiser choice, one that would probably make more money for both, and one which would keep the fans happy.  By this point though, with two origin movies behind them, it might make sense to jump straight into the Fantastic Four with them already established as heroes.  They could exist in a similar sense to Hank Pym in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, unknown but still present.  More so, one of the places that is visited by the Fantastic Four is the Microverse, and if they were stuck there then it would be an easy bridge between Ant-Man and the return of Marvel’s first family.

Namor

namorIt is not entirely clear where the rights to Namor presently rest.  Kevin Feige has indicated that Marvel, if they desired, could make a Namor movie, but that there would be some “entanglements”.  Rights to the movie have rested with Universal, but seem to have at least partially lapsed.  What remains is speculated to be the same arrangement with 2008’s The Incredible Hulk, that Marvel creates but Universal distributes.  While it was not a problem when the Marvel Cinematic Universe was still nascent, it seems moving forward that Marvel likes to create and distribute, and to get rewarded financially at 100% for its efforts.  It might make exceptions for Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four but maybe less so for Namor.  Another factor to consider is what DC Comics will manage to do with its own movies.  The other of the big two comic companies is playing catchup, but also has the benefit of controlling the movie rights to nearly all of its characters.  They have already greenlit an Aquaman movie, but it remains to be seen just how well it will do.  Aquaman is after all a hero that is taken not so seriously in pop culture, but if DC can make it work, maybe it will give Marvel second thoughts about its own underwater hero.

Thunderbolts

thunderboltsThe fact that DC Comics is playing catchup in the movie game can also be to the advantage of Marvel.  Marvel has already taken its gambles and seen those pay off, as with Guardians of the Galaxy.  DC Comics, who are eager to catch up, are also taking their own gambles, and chief among those is the Suicide Squad.  Featuring a group of villains forced into a heroic role, it might catch on, or it might flop.  Fans certainly will not be very familiar with the concept, and the concept in itself is strange enough that it might not work.  On the other hand, it might work, and if yes then it could serve as a gamble that Marvel gets to witness the results of without gambling anything itself.  If popular it could use its own villain-turned-heroes team the Thunderbolts and catch the wave of people wanting more Suicide Squad before a sequel to the DC movie comes out.  If played right as well it could help quieten those that think that the MCU’s villains are the weakest part of the movies.

Defenders

defendersMarvel is already a long way along in its development of the Doctor Strange movie, and holds the exclusive rights to the Hulk as long as he is not the featured character in a movie.  A Namor movie could be forthcoming depending on the success of Aquaman, and if Fox sees the benefits of doing so, a collaboration might be in the works to return the Fantastic Four and associated characters to the MCU, which would include the Silver Surfer.  Those four make up the original four members of the Defenders.  For those that are getting a bit tired of seeing the Avengers over and over again on the big screen, it might be an excuse to feature this other Marvel team (although Marvel is working on a street level Defenders television show as well.)  One interesting aspect about this team is that as opposed to the Avengers that the original team is made up of all non-street level characters, meaning that the stakes could be higher and that bigger things might happen as a result, such as …

World War Hulk

wwhThis has been a long rumored development in the MCU, but also not one that has not yet come to fruition.  Marvel has been careful to include in story arcs from the comics, and it has made for some great connections for fans of both mediums.  Although World War Hulk is not necessarily the best all time Hulk story, it is up there, and would be a better vehicle for putting a new spin on the Hulk stories, more so than what we are seeing at the movies, with both Hulk movies fitting the same general pattern of the Hulk being hunted by the government after smashing up a bunch of stuff.  It would also allow the character to move beyond the Avengers, which is a connection that is not as strong in the comics.  Also if all the pieces fell into place, it would mean that a lot of the major players from the crossover might be able to make it into the movie, save for the X-Men.

Hawkeye

kateRumors abound that another major character will die in the upcoming Captain America: Civil War (especially that there are pictures from the set of a funeral sequence), and without any other way to verify this other than by seeing a movie that will not be released until 2016, it still seems likely that one of the characters that might be easiest to kill off would be Hawkeye.  He is among the less popular of the main characters in the MCU, and has been almost a footnote to the movies series, appearing to provide fans with another superhero, but also one that doesn’t really do much.  Even if he does not die in the movie, it is also worth noting that the character is one which is on the verge of retirement, being somewhat older than the other heroes and with responsibilities to his family.  This could leave open the possibility for a Hawkeye movie except not as we might expect.  As the movies expand in popularity it makes sense to be closer to four quadrant movies, and one way to do this is to introduce more female characters.  If Clint Barton were to retire on screen, it could open the door for Kate Bishop to step up, providing the MCU with another superheroine, and one with a lot more of an edge than Clint.

She-Hulk and Spider-Woman

shehulkOn that same note, if Marvel is looking to keep its female fans happy it might look to develop these characters as well.  Most of the main Marvel superheroines would be tied up elsewhere, with most of the major heroines being members of the X-Men, and other such as Sue Storm or Medusa mostly only operating as parts of teams.  Others such as Elektra and even Hellcat are tied to the television series, which mean that only a few major female characters would be left to get the big screen treatment.  She-Hulk and Spider-Woman could both be strong contenders to hold down their own movie, especially if Marvel did something unexpected and went off the script with the Spider-Gwen version of Spider-Woman.  It would also help to fill the ranks of the Avengers, a team which needs to be mixed up a bit from time to time to keep the roster fresh and the fans intrigued.

Ka-Zar

tigraKa-Zar is one of the longest running Marvel characters, but also one that has not had a very solid fanbase in modern years, although unquestionably popular among many.  Although Marvel is keen on taking risks, could it make the Savage Land work the same as it made Guardians of the Galaxy work?  The Savage Land is the source of many stories within the Marvel Universe, though most of them with the X-Men.  Why might the MCU be interested in the Savage Land?  It is a fantasy setting, and while it does not match up with other heroes, could still serve as an explanation for the re-appearance of some characters who also happen to be Avengers – Hercules, Tigra or even the Black Knight.  It might be a stretch, but Marvel will be looking for new blood for its Avengers as it moves forward, as is evident from the new roster after Age of Ultron.  Tigra especially might be interesting, as she not only is her own character, but is also indirectly responsible for the development of Hellcat, whose non-superpowered version is already set to be introduced in the Marvel television show Jessica Jones.

Iron Man 4

iron manThis is perhaps the biggest question to solve in phase 4.  A big part of what made the MCU so popular is that it based its hopes on the initial movie, Iron Man.  If this movie had failed so too would the plans for the shared universe.  Success would probably have still come the way of the studio, but it would have been a longer road.  Part of the runaway success of the original Iron Man was that Robert Downey Jr. was perfectly cast as Tony Stark, what some might say is not even really acting as he seems to be mostly playing himself.  That having been said, superheroes never really age but actors and actresses do.  While the studio can get a few more years out of Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans and Scarlett Johansson (all in their early to mid 30s), and even a lot more out of Paul Bettany (whose character the Vision wears so much makeup as to be ageless) and Elizabeth Olsen (who is in her mid 20s), it can probably expect less out of Robert Downey Jr, who is now 50.  They might push him for a couple more movies, but eventually he will need to be replaced, and the biggest question would then be by who, as the character is one that is of highest importance to the MCU.  There might be no bigger question heading forward in the MCU than who will fill this role.

Pop! is Coming to the Kitchen!

After showcasing prototypes at New York Toy Fair earlier this year, Funko has announced Pop! Home!

The first series of Pop! Home 12 oz. ceramic mugs feature some of Marvel’s greatest heroes!

Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk, and Spider-Man are guaranteed to keep your drinks warm and safe from evil!

Pop! Home also includes salt and pepper shaker sets!

Spider-Man and Black Suit Spider-Man are packed together, as well as Captain America and Iron Man!

Pop! Home is out in October from Funko.

Fashion Spotlight: The American Shield, Devil’s Punishment, and Rebel Stitch

Ript Apparel has three new designs today. The American Shield, Devil’s Punishment, and Rebel Stitch from SergioDoe, Fortune-Cake, and TheFlyingPenguin will be for sale on July 25, 2015 only!

The American Shield by SergioDoe

The American Shield

Devil’s Punishment by Fortune-Cake

Devil's Punishment

Rebel Stitch by TheFlyingPenguin

Rebel Stitch

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Redskin Revisionism

1872In the course of an average week, there are over a hundred comics released, each of about twenty pages, and each of those pages with between one and six panels.  This makes for several thousand panels in the course of any week which are released.  In the middle of that whole mix one panel was printed this week, and it might have been noticed and it might not have.  In fact its place might have been there simply for historical accuracy, or it might have been a bit of a jab at an ongoing controversy.  The panel was from the new comic series 1872, part of the massive crossover that is Secret Wars.  This story is set in the year 1872 in the Old West, with Steve Rogers more or less becoming Wyatt Earp and Tony Stark becoming Doc Holliday.  Part of the background of this story is that it involves a tycoon diverting water away from a small town for his mine, and the town struggles in the middle of a desert to find a way to live.  Among those struggling is a Native American, who plans to blow up the dam controlling the water and thus giving water back to the area.  He is caught in the act of sabotage and strung up in a noose ready to die, before Sheriff Rogers intervenes.  While the story is interesting for its recasting of the characters into different roles, the panel in question comes from the execution scene involving the native.  As the executioner hits the horse upon which he sits to tighten the slack on the rope, he utters a phrase which is one which is charged with so much debate in modern culture – Redskin.

There is one specific reference to this word which causes so many issues and that is the name for the Washington team in the NFL, the Redskins.  Many have had issues with the team name before, stating that it is offensive, much along the same lines as people are troubled by the Cleveland Indians.  Other teams have addressed racism claims in different ways, but the Redskins approach is perhaps the only one which says that it is using the team name out of respect for the brave Indian fighters known as Redskins and not as a racial slur.  Despite this claim, it is evident that the team has struggled with racism throughout its history, though its defense (or more accurately non-defense) this has been primarily targeted at black people, not at Native Americans.  The team’s original owner George Preston Marshall was the last holdout in terms of racial assimilation in the NFL, having held out for almost twenty years after other teams had been drafting and playing black players, and only did so after being forced to do so b y the federal government.

redskin002The claim and partial defense of the Redskins is that their name is not offensive, but rather is meant as a token of respect, that there were brave warriors from the past that used the name.  While this itself is up to debate, it is only an attempt to try to slice up a small piece of history and to leave the bigotry behind.  This panel exemplifies that perfectly.  At someone’s execution, one wouldn’t talk about the highlights of their life, or to describe their status as a brave warrior, instead one would probably shout all kinds of obscenities at them, including in this case the use of the term Redskin.  There have been other examples of the same, and even closer to the historical source.  For instance, the comic Western Fighters used the term on its twenty fourth issue in the early 1950.  At this time there was far less concern for racism in pop culture, as it was before the civil rights movement, and thus the truer use of the term was more apparent.

Thus while the Redskins say that it is used out of respect, it is actually a lot of historical revisionism, framing an offensive word in a way that makes it look like it is not offensive.  From a legal standpoint they might have the right to use the name (though this is also being slowly eroded), but their moral stance that this is done out of respect for an obscure group of warriors has no ground to stand on.  It is racism and it is racist, and there should be no history to hide behind on this subject, and that was highlighted this week by a single panel in a single comic.

Review: 1872 #1

1872For the most part Secret Wars has been a retrospective look back at some of the biggest crossovers which ever occurred in the Marvel universe.  While it has focused on a lot of these kinds of stories it has also branched out a bit from time to time.  Some of the minor focuses have been to recast heroes or to shine a light on some villains, most of whom have been working in some kind of confine of the Secret Wars world.  In the case of 1872 though we get something completely different from what we have seen thus far in this series.  Secret Wars was itself designed as a simple enough way to clean up the Marvel Universe, touching base with some of the bigger stories which have maybe gone off the plot of the main universe, while also addressing the various multiverse dimensions which are populated by a different list of heroes.

If this was the inspiration for Secret Wars then it was rewritten and thrown away, as the context of this series is exactly that of an alternate timeline that has never seen before.  In other words, it is expanding the multiverse, not contracting it.  Here Steve Rogers is cast as Wyatt Earp and Tony Stark is cast as Doc Holliday, as they battle a corrupt mayor (Fisk) and governor (Roxxon).  The issue at hand is the water supply for a small valley, which while it is fueling the work in a mine, it is also depriving people of their access to water.  Steve stands as the representative of the law, one which he knows is broken in certain ways, but which has lines which he seems reluctant to cross, else he erode his own sense of morality.  Standing beside him is Tony, a sidekick for banter but dangerous enough by himself it would seem.  Banner is also here, though his role is still a little vague.

The result of this strange mix is actually one of the smarter ideas to come out of Marvel for this whole crossover.  There was after all a time when western comics ruled the day in the medium, and this is a bit of an homage to those days, taking not just a crossover, but instead an entire genre and mixing it into the whole of Secret Wars.  The result is fun and is as good of a Western that modern comic readers will probably ever get to see, with the same grit that made the genre so beloved for so long without the anachronisms that are thrown in with the modern versions.

Story: Gerry Duggan  Art: Nik Virella
Story: 9.3 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Civil War #1

civilwar001The Civil War tie-in to the Secret Wars crossover is something that has not really been seen yet with Secret Wars, at least not to this degree.  While other of the stories have relied on retelling their specific crossovers through replacement of characters, or fitting the series into Secret Wars, the story here plays out somewhat differently.  It doesn’t even seem to tie into Secret Wars at all, instead acting as an elaborate “What If?” story.  In this case though it is an elaborate take on this kind of story asking what would have happened if the Marvel Civil War had never ended and had continued.

After a decent setup to show what drove the two factions of heroes apart for good, the new ground rules are laid out for the torn apart country.  One half of the USA is ruled by Stark and is called the Iron.  Here registration rules where those with super abilities are registered and led to leave a life which protects them from society and which protects society from them.  The other half of the divide is the Blue, the Western portion controlled by Captain America.  This is much more like a libertarian homeland, where the only rules are the most basic.  As the two sides are brought together for peace talks, things will obviously not go so easily.  Instead a major incident leaves both sides once again at each other’s throats.

This first issue is interesting, not only because of the different approach that it takes to the Secret Wars crossover, but also because of the fundamental questions which the original crossover posed, questions to which there are no real easy answers, and they are also the questions which underlie much of the public discourse in politics at the moment, especially in the USA.  The nuances are here as to deeper questions, and while it doesn’t exactly get around to addressing them, they are still there.  This issue thus borders on something a lot deeper, while still giving an engaging story to get into.  It might not be the best overall tie-in thus far to Secret Wars, but it definitely one of the most thought-provoking, and deserves to be placed at the head of the pack.

Story: Charles Soule Art: Leinil Francis Yu
Story: 9.2 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Spider-Island #1

si001In some ways the entirety of Secret Wars has at times read like a fan fic.  Although there is a strong enough core to the overall story to hold it together, it is equally a relatively fertile ground for creators to let loose in terms of creativity.  Some tie-ins have benefited from this and others have not, and in the case of Spider-Island it is very like the former.  The creative team here has taken the crossover from four summers ago and repurposed it, asking some common fan fic questions like what if the Spider Queen had managed to take over the Avengers?  Or what if Flash Thompson as Venom was the one fighting for the city, not Spider-Man.

The plot here focuses on Flash and his few allies – Jessica Drew, the Vision and Werewolf by Night.  They are fighting a losing battle against the spread of the spider virus, and they are desperate to find something which they can do to counter it.  Werewolf by Night is himself infested but only comes to the side of the heroes when her turns into a wolf at night, and he manages to give Flash the information that he might need to finally stop the spread of the virus.  He launches a covert mission with the Vision, Jessica and himself, but things don’t turn out exactly as planned, though in this case neither for the heroes nor the villains.

The result is a fresh take on the crossover by recasting some of the main characters and by changing the baseline of the setting.  It is a bit grittier than the original, but the reimagining works well as the reader is drawn into the story almost immediately and the pace never lets up.  It is also nice to see the backup feature showing us a slightly older Spider-Girl (now Spider-Woman) from the MC2, which also sort of ties into the Secret Wars crossover.  In the end this is a pretty decent tie-in to Secret Wars, proving once again that those who are willing to push the boundaries that the freedom of the crossover allows, also benefit from those risks, as they have paid off here and elsewhere for these tie-in series.

Story:  Christos Gage, Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz Art:  Paco Diaz and Sal Buscema 
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Diversity In Comics: We’ve Come A Long Way, But We’re Not There Yet

THOR 001_coverThe comic book industry has been making great strides when it comes to introducing more cultural, and ethnic, diversity in the last decade. Superheroes are no longer just straight white men with the odd woman around, but depending on who you talk to about diversity in comics, you could easily  be mistaken for thinking that there really isn’t any. There is diversity, but not as much as perhaps there should be.

Beginning with Luke Cage, the Black Panther, and Shang Chi in the 60’s and 70’s, Marvel Comics did begin to slowly introduce ethnically diverse characters to their roster, but in a medium traditionally dominated by straight white superheroes, diversification had been a comparatively slow process. Not because publishers were against diversifying their lines (although that may have been a part of it for some) but because the publishers wanted to make money, and because the existing popular characters they had were primarily white, and it was those that were selling the comics. In roads have been made over the years, however, with the previously mentioned characters, and also characters such as Marvel’s Northstar, who famously came out in a 1992 story, finally married his long term boyfriend a few years ago; and the hugely popular Kamala Khan, the current Ms Marvel, is a Muslim American teenager.

Stan Lee has been quoted as saying in an interview with Newsarama about the casting of a white Peter Parker as the latest on screen Spider-Man;

I just see no reason to change that which has already been established when it’s so easy to add new characters. I say create new characters the way you want to,” he also added “it has nothing to do with being anti-gay, or anti-black, or anti-Latino, or anything like that. Latino characters should stay Latino. The Black Panther should certainly not be Swiss. I just see no reason to change that which has already been established when it’s so easy to add new characters. I say create new characters the way you want to. Hell, I’ll do it myself.

While he certainly has a point, it can be difficult to launch a new superhero into the public consciousness, but by casting a person of colour into a previously white character it can be an immediate show of support.

The same is also true for replacing existing characters in story for various reasons; most recently Steve Rogers retired as Captain America and so The Falcon stepped up to the plate. Thor Odinson became unworthy of his hammer, and then gave his name (Thor) over to the woman who was worthy. Likewise for reinventing existing characters; when DC rebooted their universe with the New 52, the Green Lantern Alan Scott was a gay man.

Progress is being made, but we’re not quite there yet.

Just in the last month there have been some controversies; during a recent Batgirl story objections were raised over the portrayal of a male character impersonating the lead character (however in the collected edition, the creators revised their original script).

More recently, Image Comics has long been championing diversity and inclusion for all with many of the comics they publish. Up until, that is, Airboy #2 came out this week. Whether it was the creators’ intent to show the cultural differences between the modern day and the Golden Age (from which Airboy both literally and figuratively comes from), and how far we’ve come as a society from the 1940’s in accepting transgender individuals, (or not – I may be giving too much credit here to a misguided depiction of support for the LGBTQ community) the message that many have received loud and clear from Airboy #2 isn’t one of support and acceptance, and as such, it isn’t resonating very well – if at all.

As an industry this is obviously not the message we want to give.

Regardless of the intentions behind that scene in Airboy #2, this kind of portrayal of transgender individuals not only harms the progress the industry has made in the past, and continues to make, but it can also potentially harm real life individuals.  Admirably, the writer of the comic recognized the outcry and responded.

Comics have come a long way when it comes to inclusion and acceptance for all, but we, as an industry and as a community, still have a long we to go. We need to ensure that comics are inclusive to everybody, and when they’re not then we should follow the examples that the very comics we love have shown us so many times, and speak out in favour of those who are being treated unfairly.

It was Stan Lee who said “with great power, there must also come great responsibility,” and we’ve all got the power to speak up when we see something that isn’t right.

Also published on Ramblings Of A Comics Fan.

Review: Planet Hulk #2

planethulk002Secret Wars has this far been a slightly confusing crossover.  As it has taken numerous worlds and continuities and thrown them together, there has still been a lot of influence from pretty notable crossovers at Marvel.  In most of the cases with the crossovers, the original material from the crossover provides some inspiration for the Secret Wars tie-in, but it is not always the case.  The only real unifying factor to Secret Wars is the Battle world controlled by Doom, which binds all of these worlds together although they seem ready to rebel against him.

Planet Hulk is a perfect example of this.  This is one of the big name crossovers from recent memory that manages to tie-in the whole Marvel Universe and to stay engaging and entertaining at a high level throughout.  The story featured the Hulk that had been banished to another planet due to his threat to Earth, where he found a mate before his family was killed and he returned to Earth to exact revenge in World War Hulk.  In this case though there is little inspiration left from the original series, instead focusing on Captain America, who in this version has a pet Tyrannosaurus Rex as a steed, and who inadvertently comes into contact with Doc Green.  Doc Green leads him through the bizarre landscape where everything is big and Gamma infused.  Everything also happens to be trying to kill the three of them as Doc Green leads them to a place for answers.

There is not a whole lot of substance in this issue, but neither does there have to be.  Coincidentally this issue comes out around the same time as Jurassic World has been released into theaters, and the comparison is maybe apt as both have a tyrannosaurus rex in a fight with another beast.  That is to say that it is fun if not particularly deep as a concept, something which is a treat for the eyes if not so much for the brain.

Story: Sam Humphries  Art: Mark Laming 
Story: 7.7  Art: 7.7  Overall: 7.7  Recommendation: Read

 

SDCC 2015: LEGO’s Exclusive Minifigs Include Falcon Captain America and Roy Harper

LEGO completists had minor strokes this weekend as some details of the company’s exclusive minifigures were revealed. Images of the first figure have been released. Sam Wilson, aka the Falcon, aka the New Captain America will be one of the exclusive figures to be given away. This one has a bit of a Secret Wars spin to it.

It is also rumored that Roy Harper, who was seen on the television show Arrow, will be the DC Comics release for the show.

Traditionally the figures have been given away via lottery at the show with attendees having their badges scanned and randomly chosen.

SDCC Lego Captain America Sam Wilson 1 SDCC Lego Captain America Sam Wilson 2

 

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