Tag Archives: caleb monroe

Preview: Cloaks #2 (of 4)

Cloaks #2 (of 4)

Writers: David Henrie, Caleb Monroe
Artist: Mariano Navarro

After the shocking reveal of what truly happened to his mentor and father figure Blackstone, Adam reluctantly agrees to join the ranks of the CLOAKS black-ops organization and is immediately thrown into his first mission: hunting down his predecessor on the team, someone who Adam can’t help but find familiar…

Cloaks #2 cover

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Review: Blood Queen #5

BloodQueen-05-Cov-AnacletoOne of the most surprising trends on the modern comic market is the presence of fairy tales. While these have always been with comics in one way or another, their resurgence in popularity has been one of the defining features of the past ten years. Conversely, while comics as a whole tend to incorporate almost every genre, fantasy is often one of the more niche choices of setting. In terms of overall popularity, fantasy does not compete in the medium when compared to superheroics or science-fiction. With both of these trends in mind, the story of Blood Queen is one of the more interesting on the market at present time. Most fairy tale stories incorporate fairy tale characters into the modern day, but some are based in a fantastical setting. Even these though lose this concept of the fantasy world pretty quickly and focus more on the fairy tale aspect. The exception to this trend as far as I have seen is in the series Blood Queen.

So far into this series the characters have interacted in a way which incorporates both genres. A lot of the story is based around stories straight out of fairy tales (though none specifically) such as poisoned drinks or poisoned fields. Behind this trend though is a strong impulse of the court setting which is so common among fantasy. Blood Queen thus feels like a fairly strong entry into both genres, with an engaging story.

If there is one drawback to the series thus far it is the rather drab artwork. While it fits the period to a degree, it also has a tendency to make a lot of the characters look the same. For someone that reads only one series per month, it might be easy to sort out the somewhat generic looking characters here, but without strong visual identifiers a lot of the characters tend to get muddled together. At the same time this is not of any great importance, as the main concept of the plot supersedes the individual banter between whoever it is that is speaking, either two witches or two knights.

This series has been one of my biggest surprises of the past year, and it is one of the few series which I look forward to coming out. While it is flawed in some minor ways, for fans of either fairy tales or fantasy (or both) this is an excellent series to get into, especially as it is still close enough to the start of the series to find the other issues.

Story: Troy Brownfield  Art: Fritz Cases
Story: 8.0 Art: 7.8 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Cloaks #2

Cloaks #2 coverCloaks tells the story of a street magician and social activist. In the first issue the character was established as a modern Robin Hood, with a few nice little details making the character have a bit more depth. For instance, after stealing and fencing watches he heads to drop off the money at an orphanage. While this is an interesting take on the character, it ends up being a strange changing act. Not long after the character is introduced he is recruited into a super-secret spy organization and forced to hunt down his first major criminal.

This is a decent enough concept for a series, but there is one fatal flaw in the entire presentation and that is one of length. In the first issue there were as training montage to show how to become a magician, and then in the second issue there is a training montage showing how to become a spy. In the second issue the main villain of the series is revealed, and not surprisingly the character has already been seen before as there is not enough time to get around all the necessary storytelling details of the plot, introduction of the characters, explanation of their abilities, introduction of the organizations pulling the shots, and the unconventional romance that unfolds. Already in the second issue, this series only has two more and it is hard to see that it doesn’t have to keep up this ridiculous pace throughout.

In the end that is the failing of this issue and likely of the series, that way too much is being attempted in far too little time.  This series would have benefited from either going for a smaller concept, or simply more issues. As it is, there is nothing inherently wrong with the plot, the characters or the artwork, only that it feels too crammed together.

Story: David Henrie and Caleb Monroe  Art: Mariano Navarro
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.8 Overall: 7.2 Recommendation: Pass

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE issue for review

Review: Cloaks #1 (of 4)

cloaksThe Occupy protests didn’t seem to have a substantial effect on congress, but it left an admiral impact on culture. Sure, politicians aren’t sticking it to the banks, nor are taxes rising on the super-rich, but stuff like Cloaks exists. This new mini-series, published by Boom! Studios, written by Caleb Monroe, and drawn by Mariano Navarro, follows young Adam, an illusionist who uses his talent to steal from the corruptly privileged Wall Street fat cats and give to the less fortunate. It’s a decent comic, with some clever espionage and feel-good heroics, but it isn’t without its bits of dullness that drags things down.

The protagonist of Cloaks is easy to get behind and like, due to his suave moves and strong, edgy ethical code. A few of the sequences are genuinely exciting in their cleverness, one particular scene taking advantage of Ed Dukeshire’s lettering to deliver a seamless effect that really only this medium can. Other parts are enjoyable in an almost cheap way, like when he sells stupidly expensive and stolen watches to pay for the rent of a favorite orphanage of his. The book does a solid job of juggling action and more down-to-Earth moments.

Unfortunately, Adam’s motivation is glossed over in this first issue, giving his characterization less of a kick. There are hints that his troubled, perhaps poverty-stricken upbringing may have developed his strong devotion to his Robin Hood morality, but it’s vague. On that note, the art works just fine, but is boring to look at. Facial expression and body image are done without issue, but it’s far from memorable.

It’s far from a bad comic, but not something that impresses more than a few times throughout the read. It’s decent.

Story: Caleb Monroe Art: Mariano Navarro
Story: 7.0 Art: 5.5 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

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BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Cloaks #1 (of 4)

Cloaks #1 (of 4)

Writers: David Henrie, Caleb Monroe
Artist: Mariano Navarro

In the Big Apple, a highly skilled street illusionist named Adam blows the minds of crowds with logic-defying acts, while surreptitiously using his artistry to steal from corrupt Wall Street investment bankers and re-distribute their ill-begotten wealth to those in need. He’s a modern-day Robin Hood, but his travails garner the attention of the local authorities. While evading their pursuit, Adam is confronted by three suits and quickly ascertains that freedom has a cost—in order to maintain his liberty, he must join this clandestine Black Ops organization simply known as CLOAKS.

Caleb Monroe (STEED AND MRS. PEEL, Batman) and artist Mariano Navarro (PROTOCOL: ORPHANS) bring you the Robin Hood of Wall Street, combining street magicians with a spy-fi thriller.

Cloaks01_coverA

BOOM! Studios Has a Few Tricks Up Its Sleeves with Cloaks

BOOM! Studios sees the September debut of Cloaks, a new limited series that combines the thrills of a good magic trick with a Black Ops twist. This new magical thriller is created by actor David Henrie, who learned a thing or two about magic in his role as Justin Russo on the Disney Channel Original Series Wizards of Waverly Place. Henrie, alongside writer Caleb Monroe and artist Mariano Navarro, have created the Robin Hood of Wall Street, tricking the rich out of their money and inadvertently winding up on the radar of a covert Black Ops organization.

In the Big Apple, a highly skilled street illusionist named Adam blows the minds of crowds with logic-defying acts, while surreptitiously using his artistry to steal from corrupt Wall Street investment bankers and re-distribute their ill-begotten wealth to those in need. He’s a modern-day Robin Hood, but his travails garner the attention of the local authorities. While evading their pursuit, Adam is confronted by three Suits and quickly ascertains that freedom has a cost—in order to maintain his liberty, he must join this clandestine Black Ops organization simply known as CLOAKS.

Cloaks #1 arrives in comic shops on September 3rd with a cover price of $3.99 under Diamond order code JUL140963. The first issue will ship with a main cover by W. Scott Forbes and retailer incentive cover by Phil Noto.

CLOAKS #1 Main Cover by W. Scott Forbes CLOAKS #1 Retailer Incentive Cover (1 in 10) by Phil Noto

BOOM! Announces Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Comic Series

This November BOOM! Studios and Twentieth Century Consumer Products will launch Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, a new comic book limited series based on the new film from 20th Century Fox.

Written by Michael Moreci, the six-issue series bridges the 10-year gap between the Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes films, chronicling the fall of humanity and the rise of Caesar’s ape civilization. Additional creative team details will be revealed at a later date. While the apes of the world have yet to advance as a species, Caesar must find a way to unify them to one cause. On the other side of the country, Malcolm must venture into the decaying Americas with his family to find a cure for the plague slowly killing his wife, Rita.

In addition, BOOM! Studios and Twentieth Century Consumer Products will debut Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Contagion,  a one-shot comic book prequel to the new film, at Comic-Con International in San Diego, California (a.k.a. San Diego Comic-Con), to be held July 24-27, 2014 at the San Diego Convention Center. Written by Caleb Monroe, illustrated by Tom Derenick, and featuring a cover illustrated by Garry Brown, the issue follows the story of Ellie as she struggles to find a cure for the pandemic affecting humanity before it claims her daughter’s life. The issue will retail for $5.00 and will be available for purchase exclusively at San Diego Comic-Con at the BOOM! Studios booth, #2229. The Dawn of the Planet of the Apes: Contagion one-shot marks the first time BOOM! Studios has ever exclusively debuted a brand-new comic at a convention.

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes #1 arrives in comic book shops in November with a main cover illustrated by Christopher Mitten for the price of $3.99, and a retailer incentive cover illustrated by Jay Shaw.

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES #1 Incentive Cover by Jay Shaw DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES #1 Main Cover by Christopher Mitten DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES CONTAGION Cover by Garry Brown

Preview: Steed and Mrs. Peel Vol. 3

Steed and Mrs. Peel Vol. 3

Writer(s): Caleb Monroe
Artist(s): Yasmin Liang

After a series of stinging defeats, John Cartney has reached out for help in his battle against John Steed and Emma Peel, teaming up with the Cybernauts, robots designed to replace humanity. Our super-spies face their biggest challenge yet as their two fiercest foes join forces!

SteedandMrsPeel_V3_cover

Review: Occupy Comics #3

OccupyComics 3 CoverThis week sees the final issue of the Kickstarter funded, Black Mask Studios published Occupy Comics. With the third issue, we get a solid final entry full of though provoking cartoons, editorials and a great history lesson from Alan Moore. The Occupy Comics trilogy is a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration of more than 50 comics pros is a celebration of Occupy and a time-capsule of the movement’s themes. The organizers and creators are donating all their revenue after costs to Occupy-related efforts and initiatives as well.

This issue features the talents of the before mentioned Moore, Molly Crabapple, Joshua Dysart, Caleb Monroe, Kevin Colden, Swifty Lang, Salgood Sam, Brea and Zane Grant, Shannon Wheeler and Charlie Adlard. If you’re a fan of any of these creators, this is a must get as far as comics.

The stories vary in quality and length with every one at least good and a few in the great category. Overall, there’s an air over the issue, since is the last one. A few entries reflect on the fleetingness of the Occupy movement, but also could be used as commentary on a series that I wish would go on for longer.

Occupy Comics is a perfect combination of comics and politics with a great balance of education, fairness and not being too preachy. Even though it’s labelled as Occupy, it never really takes on side or the other about the movement as each creator ads their own voice and thoughts about it. To have an anthology that allows this political thought and expression go is a loss for the comics community and I wish we could see more of it.

No matter your take on the Occupy movement as a whole, this issue, and the two that proceeded it, is a nice look at a political movement that fizzled quickly and whose long lasting contributions will be debated for some time to come. To get first hand accounts, and opinions, about what it all meant and why it happened is important in in the historical sense but also the educational. This series acted as a voice for creators to reflect and be free with what they say without corporate interference, much like the movement itself. It’s voice is one we need and one I hope we see more of down the road.

Story: Caleb Monroe, Mark L. Miller, Zane Grant, Bea Grant, Patrick Meaney, Joshua Dysart, Kelly Bruce, Alan Moore, Kevin Colden, Swifty Lang, Shannon Wheeler Art: Molly Crabapple, Theo Ellsworth, Mark L. Miller, Jonathan Spies, Jenny Gonzalez-Blitz, Eric Zawadzki, Allen Gladfelter, Salgood Sam, Matt Bors, Jerem Morrow, Frank Renoso, Eric Drooker, Charlie Adlard
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Steed and Mrs. Peel #9

STEED AND MRS. PEEL #9

Written by Mark Waid, Caleb Monroe
Drawn by Yasmin Liang
SC, 32pgs, FC, SRP: $3.99
COVER A: Phil Noto
COVER B: Joshua Covey
Diamond Code: MAR13 0938

THE RETURN OF THE MONSTER! John Cartney thought his children were the key to finally finishing off John Steed and Emma Peel — but they failed. So, since blood didn’t work, he’s turning to cold, hard steel… Evil levels up as this all-new STEED & MRS. PEEL story begins!

SteedandPeel_09_preview_Page_1

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