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Exclusive: Archaia Reveals Covers to Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand: The Illustrated Screenplay & new Slipcased Box Set

In July, Archaia, and imprint of BOOM! Studios, has two releases for fans on Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand. Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand: The Illustrated Screenplay, will include the full screenplay that the publisher used to adapt the graphic novel. It features handwritten annotations by Jim Henson and Jerry Juhl, and several new pieces of art by Ramón Pérez, including a new cover.

In addition, Archaia is offering a slipcased box set that includes the Tale of Sand graphic novel and this new Illustrated Screenplay. Ramón created a new cover for this as well. Below are the solicits for the two releases including an exclusive early look at the covers!

JIM HENSON’S TALE OF SAND: THE ILLUSTRATED SCREENPLAY HC

Retail Price: $24.99
Authors: Jim Henson and Jerry Juhl
Artist: Ramón K. Pérez
Cover Artist:  Ramón K. Pérez

If you love the imagination of Jim Henson, are an aspiring artist, or just a fan of the creative process, the final draft of this unproduced screenplay is a must-have. Plus, nine all new black-and-white pages illustrated by Ramón K Pérez that were cut, 19 original inked pages, 16 pages of layouts, and never-before-seen drawings, hand-written notes, and artifacts created from the Jim Henson Archives.

Adapted by Archaia into an award-winning graphic novel, this is the final 1974 draft of TALE OF SAND with Jim Henson and Jerry Juhl’s handwritten edits, as well as layouts and inked pages from the adaptation in gorgeous black-and-white, and never-before-seen sequences that were cut during the production of the graphic novel, newly illustrated by Ramón K. Pérez.

The Archaia team are process junkies and love sharing this incredible and unfiltered look behind the curtain at how Ramón K. Pérez took Jim Henson and Jerry Juhl’s original screenplay and turned it into one of the most critically acclaimed graphic novels of the last decade.

Tale of Sand Illustrated Screenplay Casewrap

JIM HENSON’S TALE OF SAND BOX

Retail Price: $49.99
Authors:  Jim Henson, Jerry Juhl
Artist:  Ramón K Pérez
Cover Artist: Ramón K Pérez

This is the definitive way to experience the groundbreaking JIM HENSON’S TALE OF SAND graphic novel. Featuring an all-new, wrap-around illustration by Ramón K. Pérez, this beautiful slipcase box includes the Eisner and Harvey Award-winning graphic novel adaptation of the lost Jim Henson screenplay and the new JIM HENSON’S TALE OF SAND: THE ILLUSTRATED SCREENPLAY hardcover.

Tale of Sand Box Casewrap

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Nichol Ashworth

Upside-downIt’s Thursday which brings us a new interview and our 25th “Women of BOOM!” feature, spotlighting the many kick-ass women that work at BOOM!, Archaia and KaBOOM! We’re focusing on everyone, editors, designers, writers, artists, you name it! We’re making sure to include the hard-working folks whose contributions are often overlooked in the process.

BOOM! (and KaBOOM! and Archaia) has given us unprecedented access and the chance to ask questions to their staff, and creative teams, to find out why the publisher is so successful in hiring women and their experiences in the comic industry as women.

Nichol Ashworth is a writer and artist who has worked on Fraggle Rock volume 1 and 2 for Archaia.

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry?

Nichol Ashworth: My degree is actually in animation. Though I LOVE animation, I found it (surprisingly) monotonous to illustrate 24 pictures per second. I turned to comic books as a way to still tell wonderful stories – just without so many in-betweens.

GP: Did you read comics growing up? Do you read them now? 

NA: Not until I was in college, actually. From then on I became addicted! My poor fiancée looks upon our home (that is becoming ever-crowded with more and more bookshelves) with a deepening resolve to read less books to make up for my over abundance.

Fraggle Rock v2 003 Cover AGP: How did you come to work with BOOM!/Archaia? 

NA: I had prior relationships with the magnificent Tim Beedle, who edited the Fraggle Rock title for Archaia. We met each other when I was submitting/doing work for Tokyopop and got along quite famously! He knew that I was a true Fraggle fan, down to my tootsies, so he gave me a shot to pitch for the series. I was able to write for a story of volume one and do artwork for a story in volume 2. I laughed, I cried… and then I danced my cares away. :)

GP: How would you describe your job for people? 

NA: It’s a little like giving birth, a little like being an overachieving successful communicator and a little bit like being lost in self-depreciation. I guess what I mean to say is that, the process of creation comes with highs and lows – and you need to embrace that as a part of the process. It is really fun to tell people what I do, though. It’s not something you hear from people every day… and it may or may not be cooler than being a proctologist.

GP: For people who want to pursue a career in what you do, what advice would you give them? 

NA: Never give up. Your successes may be nil at first, or may come more slowly than you wish… but never stop trying. Also, never stop giving yourself the opportunity to learn from others. Listen. There’s a saying that “God gave you two ears and only one mouth for a reason”… but I think I also like the one that says, “The more you talk, the more you’re re-hearing what you already know. The more you listen to successful people, the more options you’ve now found for new success.”

GP: Did you have a mentor to help you break into the industry? Do you mentor anyone yourself? 

NA: Again, I must bow to the almighty Tim Beedle. More than a mentor, he is also now my very good friend. He helped me break in, helped me stay in and is always there for some good feedback and a swift kick in the ass, when appropriate. While mentorship is a huge word and I wouldn’t be comfortable putting myself in that position of godlike power, I will say that I have paid it forward. I’ve helped people make industry connections, gone back to my high school and college to teach and even currently work together with an aspiring teenage writer to help her stay focused and motivated.

GP: Do you think women have a more difficult time breaking in and making it in the comic industry, if so why? And if yes, how do you think that can be overcome?  

NA: I think that one of the reasons that breaking in/staying in has worked well for me is that I haven’t tried to be a part of the Marvel/DC creator world. Smaller publishers seem more open to creating relationships with women, in my opinion. That being said – I’ve never actually tried for a Marvel or DC job… so perhaps I would get one, if I tried hard enough! :)

GP: We notice that when it comes to women in the comic industry, BOOM!/Archaia has a lot of diversity present. Why do you think have they succeeded when so many other publishers struggle with this? 

NA: My work relationships with these lovely human beings has always been very positive, productive and personable. I’m treated like an equal. In fact, the people I’ve been blessed to work with have all seemed just as excited to work in the industry as I am, so there’s a great energy and synergy that comes from that. Except for reading about other women’s struggles in the industry, I wouldn’t have known there was an issue!

GP: We’ve heard horror stories concerning women in the industry, have you ever seen or been discriminated/harassed and if so, how did you handle it?  

NA: In this particular industry, I’ve personally had no issues… but I also work in the Real Estate Investor industry and the Software Security industry. Both of those can get intense. Discrimination and harassment both abound.

GP: What advice do you have for women looking to break into the comic book industry? 

NA: My advice is the same as the answer to question #5. Plus, an added push to “prove them wrong”. If someone is a misogynist, that’s not your fault – don’t put any added stress or self-hate on yourself. That being said, don’t let it stop you, either. Don’t use it as a crutch that helps you explain away why you’re not getting what you want. Just make your work. If the work is good and you’re a good person to work with, the rest will come. Like anything, it just takes time and also, like any modern business, it’s partly about who you know. So, NETWORK, ladies! Make friends! Be responsive when called on and do your work well / on time. If people like to work with you once, they’ll usually work with you again! (And brag about you to others!)

 

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Leigh Dragoon

Fraggle Rock Vol 001 HC CoverIt’s Thursday which brings us a new interview and our 24th “Women of BOOM!” feature, spotlighting the many kick-ass women that work at BOOM!, Archaia and KaBOOM! We’re focusing on everyone, editors, designers, writers, artists, you name it! We’re making sure to include the hard-working folks whose contributions are often overlooked in the process.

BOOM! (and KaBOOM! and Archaia) has given us unprecedented access and the chance to ask questions to their staff, and creative teams, to find out why the publisher is so successful in hiring women and their experiences in the comic industry as women.

Leigh Dragoon is a writer and artist who has worked on Fraggle Rock for Archaia, Scholastic Canada’s Timeline Series, and adapted the Vampire Academy series into graphic novels, among numerous other things..

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry?

Leigh Dragoon: I started my own webcomic, By the Wayside, in the early 2000s. Shortly afterwards, I stumbled across Girlamatic. I prepared a pitch, and as soon as they opened their site for submissions that year, I sent it in!

GP: Did you read comics growing up? Do you read them now?

LD: When we were kids, my sister and I read the covers off my dad’s old Little Lulu and Disney comics at our grandmother’s house. Then we unearthed our uncle’s complete set of original, mint-condition Elfquests, and read the covers off of those, too.

GP: How did you come to work with BOOM!/Archaia?

LD: I had worked with Tim Beedle on a few projects while he was at Tokyopop. He thought my writing style might be a good fit for Fraggle Rock, so he gave me a chance to pitch a story.

GP: How would you describe your job for people?

LD: I tell people I’m a sequential artist. It sounds really fancy, and by the time they figure out what that actually means, I’m long gone.

GP: For people who want to pursue a career in what you do, what advice would you give them?

LD: Get a really good dayjob. With health benefits and paid vacation time.

GP: Did you have a mentor to help you break into the industry? Do you mentor anyone yourself?

LD: I’m extremely lucky to have Sam Kieth as a mentor. He’s an incredibly gifted artist, literally one of the nicest people I’ve ever met, and he gives wonderful advice.

GP: Do you think women have a more difficult time breaking in and making it in the comic industry, if so why? And if yes, how do you think that can be overcome?

LD: I think women do have a more difficult time, at least as far as mainstream publishing goes, but I’ve seen things change quite a bit in the past ten years, and I’m hoping they continue to change.

GP: We notice that when it comes to women in the comic industry, BOOM!/Archaia has a lot of diversity present. Why do you think have they succeeded when so many other publishers struggle with this?

LD: I think Archaia’s done a good job offering a wide range of titles, instead of focusing on just one age group, gender, or genre.

GP: We’ve heard horror stories concerning women in the industry, have you ever seen or been discriminated/harassed and if so, how did you handle it?

LD: Personally, I have not; however, I know that I’ve been very, very lucky in a lot of ways, especially when it comes to the projects I’ve been chosen to work on, and the editors I’ve worked with on those projects.

GP: What advice do you have for women looking to break into the comic book industry?

LD: Get a really good dayjob. With health benefits and paid vacation time.

Rust Vol. 3: Death of The Rocket Boy Jets Into Shops This May

Archaia has announced the May debut of Rust Vol. 3: Death of The Rocket Boy, the third installment of Royden Lepp’s exciting all-ages saga. This beautifully bound hardcover continues the story of Jet Jones and the Taylor family as they struggle with a past that’s rushing up to haunt them, and one boy’s struggle to find his place in the world. Rust is currently in development as a feature-length film at 20th Century Fox.

Oz Taylor may know Jet Jones’ secret, but convincing the rest of his family may be harder than he counted on. As Oz plots to rid the Taylor farm of the rocket boy, Jet tries to prove himself to the family that has taken him in, in hopes of finding the home he has searched for so long. However, when shadows of Jet’s past start coming back into his life, he realizes his days of running may be numbered.

Rust Vol. 3: Death of The Rocket Boy arrives in comic shops on May 7th with a cover price of $24.99.

rust vol 3 cover

Preview: Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: The Novelization HC

Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: The Novelization HC

Writer(s): A.C.H. Smith, Jim Henson
Artist(s): Brian Froud

Finally back in print and for the first time in hardcover, the novelization of LABYRINTH written by A.C.H. Smith and personally overseen by Jim Henson, is the first in a series of novels from the Jim Henson Archives.

This beautiful hardcover features unpublished goblin illustrations by legendary illustrator and concept artist Brian Froud and an exclusive peek into Jim Henson’s creative process with 50 never-before-seen pages from his personal journal, detailing the initial conception of his ideas for LABYRINTH.

Labyrinth_Novel_cover

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Katie Cook

Katie CookIt’s Thursday which brings us a new interview and our 23rd “Women of BOOM!” feature, spotlighting the many kick-ass women that work at BOOM!, Archaia and KaBOOM! We’re focusing on everyone, editors, designers, writers, artists, you name it! We’re making sure to include the hard-working folks whose contributions are often overlooked in the process.

BOOM! (and KaBOOM! and Archaia) has given us unprecedented access and the chance to ask questions to their staff, and creative teams, to find out why the publisher is so successful in hiring women and their experiences in the comic industry as women.

Katie Cook is a writer and artist who has worked on Fraggle Rock and Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard for Archaia.

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry? Did you read comics growing up? Do you read them now?

Katie Cook: These two questions go hand in hand… I have had a love of comics since I was old enough to have an opinion that Archie couldn’t possibly see anything in Veronica when he has someone like Betty. I’ve never wanted to be anything BUT a cartoonist since I was in kindergarten, so a career in comics was really my only option!

GP: How did you come to work with BOOM!/Archaia?

KC: When Archaia announced they’d be doing Fraggle Rock comics, I became an immediate pest and sent Fraggle sample after sample. Fraggle Rock is something I have a DEEP love for and i WANTED the comics. Luckily, the folks at Archaia agreed I should be a part of the book.

GP: How would you describe your job for people?

KC: I get to wake up every day and do what I love for a living. I draw, I write and I hang out in my pajamas with my kid. It’s great.

GP: For people who want to pursue a career in what you do, what advice would you give them?

KC: Making comics is WORK. More work than you’ll ever think it is.

GP: Did you have a mentor to help you break into the industry? Do you mentor anyone yourself?

KC: I consider my comic peer group my mentors… all the folks in the same position I am in the field, who I’ve known through comic conventions and online for years, are who I look up to. When someone I know sees a great success, it’s a proud feeling of “I’ve been watching their career for XX number of years and NOW look where they are! Wow!”

GP: Do you think women have a more difficult time breaking in and making it in the comic industry, if so why? And if yes, how do you think that can be overcome?

KC: I think the spot where you run into “women don’t work in comics” talk is when you talk about the “big two”. DC and Marvel don’t have a lot of female creators and that’s a sad thing… but step outside of them and the comic world is FULL of female creators that are kicking ass at what they do. There’s also a slew of indie creators that are women who are doing amazing, unique comics that make me slap my forehead and yell “why didn’t I think of that?!”.

GP: We notice that when it comes to women in the comic industry, BOOM!/Archaia has a lot of diversity present. Why do you think have they succeeded when so many other publishers struggle with this?

KC: When you have a great editor or team of editors looking for creators… It’s about talent, the art, the storytelling and turning in work on time. When you hire the right person for the job, gender isn’t an issue!

GP: We’ve heard horror stories concerning women in the industry, have you ever seen or been discriminated/harassed and if so, how did you handle it?

KC: I’ve got a lot of weird stories from almost 10 years in illustration.. I think the one that I’m finding now that I’m a woman AND a parent is the question “Well, you’re a mom? Does that mean you can’t make a deadline anymore? We can get someone else…” This question just makes me MAD.

GP: What advice do you have for women looking to break into the comic book industry?

KC: Work hard, be good at what you do and be professional. It’s the same rules for any other job… you just get the bonus that you get to make comics.

Related:

Preview: Beautiful Scars

Beautiful Scars HC

Writer(s): D. S. Talon & E. G. Thompson
Artist(s): D. S. Talon & E. G. Thompson

BEAUTIFUL SCARS tells the story of Ridley Shaw as he explains to his granddaughter how he got each of his scars, each one gained through either a sad or uplifting adventure. Through his tales, she learns how to tell her own stories and how to hold on to his through her own, magical re-telling.

Weaving historical fiction and fantasy together, Durwin S. Talon and E. G. Thompson remind us of the power of stories, both those from our imaginations and, more importantly, those from our own lives.

This is one of the most heartwarming family tales we’ve ever read. Everyone remembers the first person who inspired them to follow their dreams. This beautiful and elegant fable pays tribute to all our loved ones.

Beautiful_Scars_cover

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Guin Thompson

Guin ThompsonIt’s Thursday which brings us a new interview and our 22nd “Women of BOOM!” feature, spotlighting the many kick-ass women that work at BOOM!, Archaia and KaBOOM! We’re focusing on everyone, editors, designers, writers, artists, you name it! We’re making sure to include the hard-working folks whose contributions are often overlooked in the process.

BOOM! (and KaBOOM! and Archaia) has given us unprecedented access and the chance to ask questions to their staff, and creative teams, to find out why the publisher is so successful in hiring women and their experiences in the comic industry as women.

Guin Thompson is a writer and artist whose graphic novel Beautiful Scars will be out through Archaia next week! The graphic novel which will retail for $19.99 tells the the story of Ridley Shaw as he explains to his granddaughter how he got each of his scars, each one gained through either a sad or uplifting adventure. Through his tales, his granddaughter learns how to tell her own stories and how to hold on to his through her own, magical re-telling. Weaving historical fiction and fantasy together, Thompson, who along with co-creator Durwin S. Talon remind us of the power of stories, both those from our imaginations and, more importantly, those from our own lives.

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry?

Guin Thompson: I always loved telling stories, and always loved illustration. I tried animation when I was in college, but didn’t have the patience. Comics was like a revelation for me; I could tell a complex story in a very cinematic way, but could do it (mostly!) on my own. It remains my favorite medium for storytelling.

GP: Did you read comics growing up? Do you read them now?

I read some titles when I was young, like Archie, Peanuts, Garfield, the usual. I remember my family checking out the Asterix books from the library when I was young, and those were great. I still have vivid memories of early 1990′s Barbie comics. When I was in high school, I discovered alternative comics, and I was hooked for life. There was such a variety of storytelling and style. I think the catalyst for me was reading Chris Ware’s Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth. It was heartbreaking, beautiful, and made me cry into my shirt at 3 am after reading it in one night. I decided that this is what I wanted to do, right then and there. I still definitely read comics; nothing energizes me more than going to a comics shop. It always makes me want to go home and work!

Beautiful_Scars_rev_Page_01GP: How did you come to work with BOOM!/Archaia?

My wonderful partner, Durwin Talon, knew Mark Smylie from way back. Durwin and I came up with the premise for Beautiful Scars and wanted to see if Archaia would be interested. They have always done such interesting stories, with beautiful production values, and we felt our project would have a great home there. (This was when Mark was unloading books at GenCon out of the back of his station wagon!) So, we helped him break down one night after the con and all went to dinner. We pitched it over dessert and it was a go! It’s been so great to see the company grow and I’m so excited to be a part of it.

GP: How would you describe your job for people?

It’s hard work, but extraordinarily rewarding! I’m grateful that I get to do this. I’m also a professor, and when I teach my comics classes, I try to prepare them for how much work it is. It’s a job you do out of love. Or craziness. Maybe both.

GP: For people who want to pursue a career in what you do, what advice would you give them?

Learn to budget your time. Make things and show them to as many people as you can. Make friends with other people in the industry, it’s invaluable. Not just for professional contacts, but because they are members of your art family; no one else knows as well what you go through. Take advantage of every interesting opportunity that comes your way, but learn how to not be taken advantage of.

GP: Did you have a mentor to help you break into the industry? Do you mentor anyone yourself?

My partner really knew the ins and outs before I did. It was a great help to draw upon his expertise. And the advice, friendship and guidance of many wonderful comics pros was invaluable to me. I don’t mentor anyone one-on-one but I do teach. I think it’s important for us to share our experiences with others, and to give back. I find the comics community to be very open for the most part, very giving about their knowledge, and I want to be a part of that, since so many people were gracious and generous with their own experiences. That’s very important to me.

GP: Do you think women have a more difficult time breaking in and making it in the comic industry, if so why? And if yes, how do you think that can be overcome?

I think in mainstream comics, there is still a lot of bias for women looking to break in. There’s still this boy’s club mentality. I have read interviews that feel very threatened by the fact there is a demand for more diversity in their artist lineups, and to me, that means they know they’re not doing right. They complain that their readership is dwindling, but don’t want to include story lines “for girls” (which are really just interesting stories available to a wide variety of humans). Their solutions are tone-deaf, like revamping a character’s costume to be even more revealing, which only panders to the current readership, and doesn’t grow their fan base. (I’m aware it’s fantasy, but it’s a power fantasy for dudes about what is capable with their bodies, and what is capable of being done to women’s bodies). It’s very tiresome to read these interviews with editors and creators that go on and on about how women don’t read their books, it’s not their audience, women don’t want to create comics, blah blah blah, when clearly this is not the case.

I think the comics medium as a whole is changing and evolving every year and creators are pushing what is capable as an art form, which opens up a lot more space for different kinds of stories and voices. There are a lot more avenues for artists and creators who want to get into the industry other than the entrenched mainstream publishers. But if you are drawn to that kind of story, and really want to be an inker or a penciler or whatever for one of those companies, and you are a lady, you’re going to run into some flak. If your work is excellent, it shouldn’t matter, but it still seems to in some arenas. In others, it doesn’t.

GP: We notice that when it comes to women in the comic industry, BOOM!/Archaia has a lot of diversity present. Why do you think have they succeeded when so many other publishers struggle with this?

Really, it’s because of the stories. The range of stories and styles is stunning. It doesn’t feel like it’s by the company line; it’s really creative and interesting. I think anywhere that encourages and supports unique expression is going to have a more diverse range of storytellers. I’m very happy to be associated with it.

GP: We’ve heard horror stories concerning women in the industry, have you ever seen or been discriminated/harassed and if so, how did you handle it?

For the most part, I’ve been lucky. In my experience, the vast majority of people related to the industry are lovely and wonderful. However, I do not want to negate the very real experiences that some women have regarding sexism and harassment; I have just been lucky to not have encountered them. I have heard some horror stories from friends and acquaintances, and it just makes my blood boil. I’ve had people come up to me and offer their comments and want me to respond on behalf of all women, and I can’t do that. It’s dumb. I’ve had generic bad experiences, people taking the opportunity of my presence to rant at me about female characters, demanding I defend my place there because I can’t possibly be interested in comics. That kind of stuff. I don’t really engage. It’s not worth the energy.

GP: What advice do you have for women looking to break into the comic book industry?

Same advice as above. Just keep at it! A support system (whether it’s family, friends, other professionals, your partner, etc) is absolutely invaluable. Strive to make your best work, show it off proudly, seek advice and don’t give up!

Related:

BOOM! Studios Heads to Emerald City Comicon

BOOM! Studios and its imprints, KaBOOM!, BOOM! Box, and Archaia, are heading back to Emerald City Comicon which is taking place this weekend at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, Washington, on the weekend of March 28-30, 2014.

BOOM! will have its biggest booth ever at any convention it has exhibited at in a whopping 20 feet x 70 feet space, centrally located in the show on The Skybridge, Booth #1002. An army of BOOM! writers and artists will be appearing either at its booth or in ECCC’s Guest Area. A signing schedule handout will be available at the booth for fans’ convenience. Scheduled to appear are:

  • Max Bemis (Evil Empire, Polarity) – This ticketed signing will be held at the Guest Area. Tickets will be available at the BOOM! booth.
  • David Petersen (Mouse Guard)
  • Kevin J. Anderson (Clockwork Angels)
  • Mike Kunkel (Herobear and the Kid)
  • Claudio Sanchez and Chondra Echert (Translucid, Amory Wars)
  • Paul Jenkins (Fairy Quest, Deathmatch, Revelations)
  • Ryan North, Shelli Paroline, and Braden Lamb (Adventure Time, The Midas Flesh)
  • Noelle Stevenson (Lumberjanes, Adventure Time)
  • Royden Lepp (RUST)
  • Kate Leth (Adventure Time OGN Vol. 3: Seeing Red, Bravest Warriors Annual 2014)
  • Brian Joines (Imagine Agents)
  • Caleb Monroe (Steed and Mrs. Peel, Peanuts)
  • Ed Brisson (Sons of Anarchy, Robocop: Beta)
  • Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover (Adventure Time: The Flip Side)
  • Grace Ellis (Lumberjanes)
  • Michael Moreci, Riley Rossmo, Tim Daniel, and Colin Lorimer (Curse)
  • Mark Miller and Ben Meares (Clive Barke’s Next Testament, Hellraiser)
  • Megan Hutchison and Tom Hammock (An Aurora Grimeon Story: Will O’ The Wisp)
  • Michael Alan Nelson (Day Men, 28 Days Later, Protocol: Orphans)

There will also be a few surprise guests throughout the show.

In addition, the BOOM! Studios booth will host sketch artists all weekend, including:

  • Allison Strejlau (Regular Show, Adventure Time)
  • Brooke Allen (Lumberjanes)
  • Ian McGinty (Adventure Time: Candy Capers)
  • MAD Rupert (Regular Show: Skips)
  • Missy Pena (Bravest Warriors).
  • Travis Hill (Adventure Time)

For $20, fans can request and purchase custom sketches to be drawn on blank Adventure Time Get-A-Sketch covers.

Joining them on The Skybridge occupying in-line booths on either side of the BOOM! booth are Archaia artists David Marquez (The Joyners in 3D, Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man) and Royden Lepp (RUST), plus BOOM! Studios business partners Mighty Fine and TopatoCo.

BOOM! will have a wide selection of variants available for purchase at its booth (while supplies last), including:

  • Adventure Time #25, cover by Ian McGinty ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Adventure Time Vol. 3 Mathematical Edition Hardcover, cover by E.K. Weaver ($50, limited to 500 copies)
  • Clockwork Angels #1, cover by Brett Weldele ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Curse #1, cover by Colin Lorimer ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Day Men #3, cover by Robbi Rodriguez ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Dead Letters #1, cover by Ibrahim Moustafa ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Evil Empire #1, cover by Tyler Crook ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Herobear and the Kid: Saving Time #1, cover by Mike Kunkel ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Lumberjanes #1, cover by Kate Leth ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • The Midas Flesh #1, cover by Chip Zdarsky ($10, limited to 500 copies)
  • Regular Show: Skips #1, cover by Matthew Waite ($10, limited to 250 copies)
  • Sons of Anarchy #7, cover by Darick Robertson ($10, limited to 500 copies)
The Adventure Time Vol. 3 Enchiridion Edition ($75, limited to 500 copies), a leather-bound version sold exclusively at the BOOM! booth at conventions, will debut at Emerald City Comicon and is available during the 2014 convention season while supplies last.

There will also be exciting new merchandise available for purchase, such as an Evil Empire T-Shirt, a Lumberjanes tote bag, and a Translucid print.

ADVENTURE TIME #25 by Ian McGinty ADVENTURE TIME VOL. 3 ENCHIRIDION Edition ADVENTURE TIME VOL. 3 MATHEMATICAL Edition Hardcover by E.K. Weaver CLOCKWORK ANGELS #1 by Brett Weldele CURSE #1 by Colin Lorimer DAY MEN #3 by Robbi Rodriguez DEAD LETTERS #1 by Ibrahim Moustafa EVIL EMPIRE #1 by Tyler Crook HEROBEAR AND THE KID SAVING TIME #1 by Mike Kunkel LUMBERJANES #1 by Kate Leth REGULAR SHOW SKIPS #1 by Matthew Waite SONS OF ANARCHY #7 by Darick Robertson

Interview: Women of BOOM! – Nimue Brown

nimuebrownIt’s Thursday which brings us a new interview and our 21st “Women of BOOM!” feature, spotlighting the many kick-ass women that work at BOOM!, Archaia and KaBOOM! We’re focusing on everyone, editors, designers, writers, artists, you name it! We’re making sure to include the hard-working folks whose contributions are often overlooked in the process.

BOOM! (and KaBOOM! and Archaia) has given us unprecedented access and the chance to ask questions to their staff, and creative teams, to find out why the publisher is so successful in hiring women and their experiences in the comic industry as women.

Nimue Brown is a writer who has worked on the Hopeless Maine graphic novel series published by Archaia.

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry?

Nimue Brown: I was lured in by my artist, Tom Brown. Although I loved Sandman, I wasn’t much of a comics person, had grown out of capes and superheroes and didn’t really see it as a space for me. It took him a long time to persuade me to have a go, and it was the alternative nature of Tom’s art work that convinced me there could be a space in comics for the kinds of stories that interest me.

GP: Did you read comics growing up? Do you read them now?

NB: I grew up with Batman, a bit of Superman and some exposure to X-Men. In my teens I found and fell in love with The Sandman, and then I fell out of comics entirely. However, trying to write them it seemed only sane to dive back in, so I read all sorts of things, sometimes just to try and understand technical aspects, sometimes out of love. I like webcomics a lot, I like the immediacy and the sheer diversity.

GP: How did you come to work with BOOM!/Archaia?

NB:We asked nicely and Archaia said yes! We came along with an existing webcomic, and were taken on as a property.

Hopeless Maine v2 Inheritance GN CoverGP: How would you describe your job for people?

NB: Being the writer doesn’t take long. A couple of weeks of intensive work from me can keep Tom busy for months, so I feel a bit like an absentee landlord sometimes. I love what I do though.

GP: For people who want to pursue a career in what you do, what advice would you give them?

NB: The webcomic was great for us, it allowed us to build an audience, and it made us keep working. It’s no longer the case that putting things in the public domain rules out getting a contract – often the reverse. A readership is a real asset, however you go. It’s not until you jump in and really do it, putting the work in front of people, that you find out if you can, and if anyone likes it. Knowing you have readers is a great motivator, finding that you don’t is a great teacher.

GP: Did you have a mentor to help you break into the industry? Do you mentor anyone yourself?

NB: Tom had a lot more comics experience than me, which has helped a lot. Donna Barr gave me a lot of advice about what I might run into as a woman in comics. Other people have picked my brains along the way.

GP: Do you think women have a more difficult time breaking in and making it in the comic industry, if so why? And if yes, how do you think that can be overcome?

NB: I think the industry is still assumed to be stories for boys, and that stereotype needs breaking down further. However, publishers are getting savvy to the fact that women generally read more than men, and are 50% give or take of the population, and that’s a big potential market to break into. So, I think things are getting easier. There are still too many places where women in comics as characters are either highly sexualised eye-candy, victims to rescue, or prizes to win, but the indy sector is delivering much more engaging female characters all the time, and I think that will knock on to inform how accessible the industry as a whole is for women, both as readers and as creators.

GP: We notice that when it comes to women in the comic industry, BOOM!/Archaia has a lot of diversity present. Why do you think have they succeeded when so many other publishers struggle with this?

NB: Archaia doesn’t do superheroes attired in something dangerously close to fetish gear. It’s not afraid of stories that go outside the usual bounds of ‘comic’ and this means it is more attractive to women, more likely to get female creatives knocking on the door in the first place. There’s no sense of some ‘old boy’ network at Archaia, there are women on the staff, in the editing team, so there’s an openness to female participation I don’t think you get everywhere. It’s a culture thing, and culturally, Archaia is excellent.

GP: We’ve heard horror stories concerning women in the industry, have you ever seen or been discriminated/harassed and if so, how did you handle it?

NB: I’ve not had any first-hand experience, I’m very glad to say, but we spend more time at Steampunk and Druid events (very female friendly spaces) than we do in the specifically comics gatherings, and I don’t bare my skin. I think all women should have the freedom to dress as they please and be free from harassment, but at the same time, I don’t feel any desire to wear that kind of kit myself, so I doubt I’d attract that kind of attention. Archaia is the only comics publisher I’ve ever worked for, and gender just isn’t an issue there, except in so far as I suspect Archaia of wanting to court the potential female comics reading market, which is fine by me!

GP: What advice do you have for women looking to break into the comic book industry?

NB: Tell your own stories on your own terms. Whatever those are. There is no need to replicate what already exists, or to conform to assumptions about what comics mean, and require of us.

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